What is the best way of revising for history medicine through time

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Cashper1234
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Any specific tips to this , please ?
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PercyChatsworth
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I just used BBC GCSE Bitesize
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Cashper1234
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If you do not mind me asking what grade did you achieve form using bitesize?
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Cognoverant
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I think I wrote out my notes several times, and made a list of all the dates, which I ranked in importance from 'very important' (like the Public Health Act 1848) down to 'learn if I have time' (like the invention of the microscope), and learned them in that order.

It's good to try to explain things to other people, too, to help you remember. I also remember making lots of lists, so, for example, five key areas of Hippocratic medicine (rejection of supernatural ideas, Hippocratic oath, clinical observation, the four humours, and something else that I've since forgotten)

Hope that helps
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Cashper1234
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What grade did you achieve?
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Cognoverant
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A*
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PercyChatsworth
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(Original post by Cashper1234)
If you do not mind me asking what grade did you achieve form using bitesize?
A* but I did have fairly decent notes from class and I tend to remember things fairly easily. This is quite a decent site with revision notes if you need them.

Revision style is quite a personal thing. Have a think about how you learn best. Hope it goes well for you.
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Cashper1234
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How long were your notes, did you cover everything and well done in getting an A*
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Melz0r
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DRAW A HUGE TIMELINE.

No kidding, worked for me!
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Krishna442
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i didn't do medicine through time, did crime and punishment but the way they were taught and the things we were meant to get out of it were the same.

most of history (imo) is technique, if u get your technique down pat then whatever comes up u'll be fairly prepared for.. so practice the questions and try and get a rough framework of an answer that u can use for each question. it doesn't really change much...
intro... point..evidence... develop... point.. evidence.. develop. then the trademark "however" conclusion etc etc

after technique though, u need to make sure u have the knowledge necessary to use it. and be a bit more tactical about it.. having a list of key dates/developments is worth learning.. ones that were so key that regardless of what way the questions leaning, u can use them despite the context.
putting together a list like this and learning it well worked for me (at gcse and alevel)
as soon as i got into the exam i wrote it all down.. so as i was answering the question i could look at this cribsheet almost of dates and pick and choose what i think would be best whilst at the same time seeing what else i could write about.

hope thats helped somewhat / given u some ideas.
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Cashper1234
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(Original post by PercyChatsworth)
A* but I did have fairly decent notes from class and I tend to remember things fairly easily. This is quite a decent site with revision notes if you need them.

Revision style is quite a personal thing. Have a think about how you learn best. Hope it goes well for you.
Do you think bitesize notes are good enough to get an A*?
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emma363
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I'm in the process of making a huge mind map out of revision guide stuff/class notes/internet and i'll make sure i know everything on it off by heart
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Cashper1234
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(Original post by Krishna442)
i didn't do medicine through time, did crime and punishment but the way they were taught and the things we were meant to get out of it were the same.

most of history (imo) is technique, if u get your technique down pat then whatever comes up u'll be fairly prepared for.. so practice the questions and try and get a rough framework of an answer that u can use for each question. it doesn't really change much...
intro... point..evidence... develop... point.. evidence.. develop. then the trademark "however" conclusion etc etc

after technique though, u need to make sure u have the knowledge necessary to use it. and be a bit more tactical about it.. having a list of key dates/developments is worth learning.. ones that were so key that regardless of what way the questions leaning, u can use them despite the context.
putting together a list like this and learning it well worked for me (at gcse and alevel)
as soon as i got into the exam i wrote it all down.. so as i was answering the question i could look at this cribsheet almost of dates and pick and choose what i think would be best whilst at the same time seeing what else i could write about.

hope thats helped somewhat / given u some ideas.
what grade did you get by using this method and when did you start revising for history
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nowrin
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I'm doing Medicine Through Time (possibly the most boring thing I've ever have to waste my life on). I use my class notes and mind maps and things.
Germany, I find easier to learn, because it's actually interesting.
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Krishna442
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(Original post by Cashper1234)
what grade did you get by using this method and when did you start revising for history
i got an A*... again though.. technique and knowledge go hand in hand.
u can know all the facts about this but get nowhere near that grade if you can't use them in writing ur essays and likewise, an essay with a lot of development but no knowledge to back it up means v little.
so i wouldnt say that i received an A* "because of this method"
but it is an additional thing to try and use if ur looking for ways of learning the information.

i dont remember when i started tbh....
i defo started revising for my gcse sometime during the easter hols(i think) but i really cant remember.. was a long time ago.
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Iepnauy
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I'm currently revising this . I'm just reading through the massively huge white book. Works for me coveres everything info wise, I need
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LB7
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I know this is a bit late, but I'm doing my exam next year in this course. The best thing i think is to take notes from a book and go over and over them - get other people to test you. I would recommend using this book: Medicine Through Time: Revision book for GCSE History by Jack Hartell. It's available on Amazon - and it's only £1.79, much cheaper than the other books.

(Also it's not overly long so doesn't put me off reading! Although it does still contain all the the info!!! )
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J C
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I made cards for each significant person/event(black death etc.)/time period and included summarised notes, stuck them up on my wall then got someone to test me on them regularly. I also made a poster of significant dates which really helped.

I also made a huge timeline covering every significant events affecting different groups for my other history unit (American West). I wish I had done this for Medicine as it showed events in relation to others.

Do lots of past paper questions also as history is heavily based around how well you can write an essay

History is the only GCSE I did that I would really recommend starting revision early for.
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hakbar
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How do u think i should lay out my history revision? Should i start with medicine and work my way through the timeline and write the impact, advantages and disadvantages of each element and person??


false
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LB7
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The best way of revising for this course (or the new Medicine in Britain version) is still with Jack Hartell's books on Amazon - cheap and super concise, so easy to understand! I think he's released a new version for the new updated version for the Medicine in Britain course as well!

Best revision book I ever bought
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