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    'law me <insert item here>

    Give me <inserted item>
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    (Original post by MR_JR)
    'law me <insert item here>

    Give me <inserted item>
    yeh itz lark dis yeh:

    borrow us a pen, coz a lark usin the wrong word and thinkin am so ard that i count as 'us' coz there iz so many of meh, bruva . word.
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    In the quiet words of the virgin mary, Come again?
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    (Original post by SketchyCanvas)
    or 'wagwan!' what does that mean again?
    I beliebe it's "What is going on, dear fellow?"

    or Warrrblow, what's that all about?
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    "wt ****" instead of wtf.
    Aw, let the poor people think they're hard by spelling it out.

    Also, some of these might be a bit Geordie for you guys but here goes:
    alfie v. To grass somebody up to the authorities, to tell tales:
    Ch: "He puar alfied on me."
    Eng: “I suspect he’s the reason I’m a suspect.”

    a'narrrh v.The words ‘I know’, drawled slowly through what sounds like a a full nose of snot. This noise is used often and anywhere in a Charver conversation, to indicate agreement and understanding.

    bail n. A convenient arrangement with the magistrates, that allows Charvers to continue robbing before their trial.

    bar n. A basic unit of charver currency, equivalent to a full English pound. As in:
    Ch: “Aah giv’im a good howkin’ and they ownly fined ‘iz fowty-bar.”
    Eng: “I was fined a mere forty pounds for my latest ‘misunderstanding’.”

    bella n. Bella Brusco, a cheap sparkling white wine that gets one peeved-up for a couple of quid a bottle. It’s the Charver Carva, perfect for that tab-lit chip supper and best served at bus-stop temperature. See also White *****, Paggered and Monged-up.

    belta adj. Expression of enthusiasm: top-notch, excellent, brilliant. Can be used to emphasise anything that is exceptional in Charver life.
    Ch: “Swear to god, this tack’s proper belta.”
    Eng: “Do you want to buy a tenner deal of horse *****?”

    bewer n. Older female of the Charver species. Not necessarily complimentary, if said to a young single lass.
    Ch: “Aahm gan yairm to me bewer.”
    Eng: “It’s time to return to the little lady.”

    bizzies n. Adopted by Charvers who’ve watched a lot of TV Soaps (Brookie, etc.) from the Scouse word for police officers. See also polliss.

    bucket n. Household implement part-filled with water, providing tab-less Charvers with a complicated method of getting off their tits on tack.

    bus fare n. Many’s the time you’ll hear these words in a request by Charvers, and think the poor mites are stranded in town. They’re not. They’re thirsty.
    Ch: “Can you lend iz ten-bob for me bus fare?”
    Eng: “I’m fifty-pence short of a bottle of Bella.”

    chaw To steal something, or to go on the rob.
    Ch: “Wor kid’s oot on the chaw.”
    Eng: “My brother is out gathering items for the household.”

    chiv 1. n. Knife or sharp implement. 2. v. To stab someone.

    chivved-up adj. Carrying a knife for mischevious purposes.
    Ch: “Wotcha back Dazza, eez chivved-up.”
    Eng: “Proceed with caution Darren, he appears to have a weapon.”

    clivva 1. adj. Intelligent. 2 . adj. Healthy.
    Ch: “Ye divvn’t look ower clivva.”
    Eng: “Perhaps the last spliff has made you unwell.”

    couple-on n. When a Charver lights a cigarette, his or her mates will instinctively shout “couple-on”. From then, the tab will be fought over by all ten or so of them, each trying to suck as much smoke as possible in their alotted two goes.
    This leaves the runt of the litter with the filter:
    Ch: “Leave iz the white, not the *****.”
    Eng: “I’d rather not inhale the filter, thank-you.
    • See also fog-on and duck’s arse.

    cowie n. Low-quality recreational drug sold to the unwary as ‘ecstasy’ and often taken in bulk. Also known as a ‘disco biscuit’.
    Ch: “Aah wez proper cowied off me tits.”
    Eng: “After seven pills I felt quite giddy.”

    crib n. Where a Charver sleeps at night. A bed, *******-pit.
    Ch: “Ask me ma, aah wez in me crib.”
    Eng: “My mother will vouch that I wasn’t out last night, officer.”

    cush adj. Shortened form of Cushty,
    meaning good or cool. For extra emphasis, the words double, or puar (pure) can be inserted before it.
    Old Charver joke: “Me telephone number’s two-six-one, double-cush, double-cush.”

    deek v. To look. Charvers don’t like being looked at, hence:
    Ch: “What yee deekin’ at? Hev a got a telly on me heed?”
    Eng: “Are you looking at me?”

    doilum n. A Charver term for someone of below average intelligence. By anyone’s standards, that’s a complete imbecile. Also know as a ‘dafty’.

    ducks arse n. The filter of a tab that has been moistened with the spittle, pus and phlegm of the dozen or so drooling charvers who’ve shared it. This also applies to the roach in a spliff.

    eeenaaar n. The call of the female Charver, when asked if she’s got any tabs or booze. (Literally, “Oh no!”) Many males have now adopted this ‘word’ as a term of endearment for their girl-folk. Hence:
    Ch: “This place is chokka with eeenaaars.”
    Eng: “There’s lots of ladies here with no money.”

    fog n. First.

    fog-on v. This is the call of the caring Charver, who’s seen you light a cigarette and wants to spare you the trauma of inhaling the last few cancerous draws before it reaches the filter. If there’s two Charvers you’ll hear the shout ‘Sec’; and if you want to see a fight, flick a half-smoked tab into a bus-stop full of them.

    friskin' To joke, or to take the mickey.
    Ch: "I wez ownly friskin' ya, man"
    Eng: “Perhaps you’ve missed the humour in what I just said.”

    gadgie n. Like many Charver words this is of gypsy origin, and means ‘old man’. Hence girls may say: “Divvn’t fancy yours, he’s a puar gadgie.”
    Charvers on the rob use the word to describe a security man.
    Ch: “Gan canny, the gadgie’s got a durg.”
    Eng: “If you burgle that factory, you’ll get the night-watchman’s Rottweiler on your arse.”

    geet adj. Literally, ‘great’ – but in Charver use has become a meaningless amplification in any sentence: “Ah geet went doon the Spar shop to buy some geet lager, but the geet **** wot works there wouldn’t serve iz.”
    The word has been corrupted on parts of Tyneside to ‘git’, in which sense it’s also used to exaggerate something.
    Ch: “You’re git thick, yee.”
    Eng: “I sometimes wonder about your intelligence.”

    gluey n. A sniffer of glue – one of the lowest life-forms known to Charvers. Even smackheads view them with pity.

    graft v. In normal Geordie parlance, this means work. When an unemployed Charver goes ‘on the graft’, they expect to make some money by other means. See also, On A Mish.
    Ch: “Is your Darren still on the graft’’?
    Eng: “I’ve noticed a lot of broken windows down our side of the street, when will your son start on the other side?”

    greef v. To be giving someone unnecessary hassle.
    Ch: Divvn’t grief iz, it’ll still smurk.
    Eng: Given time, this spliff will be smokeable.

    heed the baal n. Literally, ‘Head The Ball’. Someone with a damaged head, perhaps a bit mad:
    Ch: “He’s a proper heed the baal, him.”
    Eng: “I’d watch that knacker, if I were you.

    hew adv. Can also be pronounced 'how'. Nobody knows or cares what it means: it’s used so frequently in Charver conversation, it’s the equivalent of a grunt. Example:
    Ch: “Ah divvn’t knaa aboot ye, hew, but aam gan yairm, hew.”
    Eng: Eh?
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    'Butters' (meaning an ugly person)

    Worst slang ever.
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    'At the end of the day...' and 'to be honest...'
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    wagwan pussyklats, wots gwinin in da student room?
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    People that say innit after every sentence.
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    "you know wha i mean"

    "at the end of the day"

    and science from big brothers "you get me"
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    i dont like 'tru-say'

    dunno if thats how you say it, but i hate it
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    I hate it when people say 'us' instead of me.

    I also dislike 'safe', 'nnaarmean?'

    I have to admit I use 'wicked' a lot. And until recently used 'innit'.
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    'like' people at school sprinkle their every conversation with this. after every word or so its 'like'... it's 'like' so annoying!!! it's also contagious! ithankfully i stop myself on time..i hope!! its very annoying to listen to cos you 'like' get fed up of 'like' listening to the person cos she's 'like' talking all weird 'like'...
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    "innit man" <----- ewwww
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    *cringes*
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    That 'mangy' word... "pukka".

    I don't class my opinion as golden but that word is horrible... I'm sure I'm right.

    All 'ghetto' slang sounds just plain hilarious when said by white people
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    Does anyone else hate the word "Lush"! I hatttttttttttttttte it, the biggest chav word ever! "Oh my god thats lush mate" drives me insane
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    How about "24/7" or the people who take the liberty to say what it means afterwards:

    "24/7....24 hours of the day, 7 days of the week man!"

    *shudders*

    Perhaps the following MSN abbreviation gets on your nerves:

    "What are you doing now?"

    "Im on XYZ.com"

    "kk" <----------------- AAAAAAAAARGH!


    The worse piece of slang (which often gets hurled at me quite generously) is "neek". What is a "neek"? After searching for a definition, I finally come across a rudimentary one [kindly given by the rude boys of the estate]:

    "A cross between a geek and a nerd"

    Right
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    "A cross between a geek and a nerd"
    I don't need to comment. It's just too obvious.

    Hey, perhaps you're neek for actually looking it up!
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    RANDOM

    random is bad bad word! It's fine if you use it now and again about things that are actually random, but not allllllll the time like most of my friends.

    and also when people put on accents. My cousin goes to a big public school and speaks the queens English (as my mum says) most of the time, but when she's with me and my brother she starts on all the ' ain't nothing wrong with that' and ' innit' and ' it's like, like, well, like'.

    It sounds so staged and I don't care if she talks like the queen or not really
 
 
 
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