Why do people consider it rude when asked who they are voting for?

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TurkeyProphet
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This is seriously puzzling me. People say it is a personal question and akin to asking how much someone earns or how much their house is worth.

I don't really understand this. Why would you be ashamed of who you are voting for?
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StartSomething
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I don't see it as a personal question.
I'd quite happily tell anyone who asked.
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stinky--pete
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not ashamed, it's just private and some people don't think there's any need. my parents have never said who they're voting for but the rest of my family are traditional labour, however, my grandma is 'protesting' this year and voting conservative!!
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username133326
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(Original post by TurkeyProphet)
This is seriously puzzling me. People say it is a personal question and akin to asking how much someone earns or how much their house is worth.

I don't really understand this. Why would you be ashamed of who you are voting for?

Because the secret ballot is a key principle of democracy.

Also, there is the danger if you say something controversial, that you'll get your head kicked in.
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mike_J
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(Original post by TurkeyProphet)
This is seriously puzzling me. People say it is a personal question and akin to asking how much someone earns or how much their house is worth.

I don't really understand this. Why would you be ashamed of who you are voting for?
I don't really get it either. I think it's because these types of people who get offended are the type of people who don't know the policies of the party they're voting for (e.g. 'I'm voting Labour because my parents do...'), or are unable to defend themselves when asked why they're voting for X. Being offended is a good avoidance strategy.
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JW92
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:dontknow: It tends to be something older people refuse to do for some reason.

(Original post by Barden)
Because the secret ballot is a key principle of democracy.
Isn't open discussion and debate about politics and political parties a bit more key to democracy than coy secrecy?

(Original post by mike_J)
Being offended is a good avoidance strategy.
:yep: I have also noticed this.
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Blu3j4yw4y
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(Original post by Barden)
Because the secret ballot is a key principle of democracy.

Also, there is the danger if you say something controversial, that you'll get your head kicked in.
This.

While there's nothing wrong with being proud of who you're voting for, we have the right to keep it private if we wish. Obviously you can just chose not to answer, but even asking is putting pressure on them to reveal their vote which shouldn't happen.
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im so academic
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:rant:

I actually get pissed when I ask people "who are you going to vote for" "who do you support" and then they tell me "oh it's personal".

:nothing: What's wrong with telling people who you're supporting? (Unless you're ashamed of your party, which is pathetic - why would you support them then?)

Whenever I get that reaction, I just think "Labour voter". :rolleyes:
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Tomato_Soup1992
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Whats wrong with asking about income?
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faber niger
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Presumably because they expect you to heckle them if they say a party which you dislike.

I wouldn't mind personally though (as you can see from my signature).
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Y__
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It's because the people who ask everyone about their political affiliations are usually those that will give you a 3 hour lecture if your views don't agree with theirs.
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MagicNMedicine
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I agree with that, its because they think you might lecture them on it and try to convert them.
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Blu3j4yw4y
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(Original post by JW92)
Isn't open discussion and debate about politics and political parties a bit more key to democracy than coy secrecy?
Not really, before we had the secret ballot there was a huge amount of corruption in politics, people could literally buy votes and threaten those who didn't vote where they wanted them to. If we gave up our right to the secret ballot then its not far-fetched to imagine that could start up again. :dontknow:

Its very important that we have the right to keep our vote private. Unless you're suggesting that people lie when asked, in which case what's the point of asking?
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BrightGirl
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It's not to do with being ashamed, but personally I don't reply to those sorts of questions because I've noticed once some people find out who you're voting for, and they happen to have an opposing view, they're quite likely to start up banal debates whenever they can/try to change your opinion/treat you differently.

It's private so just respect someone's view if they don't want to tell you.
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BrightGirl
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(Original post by im so academic)
:rant:

I actually get pissed when I ask people "who are you going to vote for" "who do you support" and then they tell me "oh it's personal".

:nothing: What's wrong with telling people who you're supporting? (Unless you're ashamed of your party, which is pathetic - why would you support them then?)

Whenever I get that reaction, I just think "Labour voter". :rolleyes:
Lol how old are you?
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TurkeyProphet
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(Original post by Tomato_Soup1992)
Whats wrong with asking about income?
There's nothing wrong with it really, it's just that people may be embarrassed at how much or how little they earn and the only real reason to ask someone is to compare to how much you earn.

Which is a bit snobbish.
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RyanT
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I smirk and think BNP voter!

I don't personally see the issue really, but it depends on who is asking. I wouldn't discuss politics with a boss at work for example.
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TurkeyProphet
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(Original post by BrightGirl)
It's not to do with being ashamed, but personally I don't reply to those sorts of questions because I've noticed once some people find out who you're voting for, and they happen to have an opposing view, they're quite likely to start up banal debates whenever they can/try to change your opinion/treat you differently.

It's private so just respect someone's view if they don't want to tell you.

I do respect people who don't want to tell me (which has never happened...) and I've never had a problem when discussing politics with people.

I'm just genuinely curious why it is considered rude. I can understand why someone might not want to discuss politics.
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JW92
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(Original post by Blu3j4yw4y)
Not really, before we had the secret ballot there was a huge amount of corruption in politics, people could literally buy votes and threaten those who didn't vote where they wanted them to. If we gave up our right to the secret ballot then its not far-fetched to imagine that could start up again. :dontknow:

Its very important that we have the right to keep our vote private. Unless you're suggesting that people lie when asked, in which case what's the point of asking?
There's an enormous difference between being coerced at the ballot box and casual conversation about politics. I think the latter is a very healthy approach to democracy and helps us move away from an electoral system based on family allegiances, class allegiances and tribal sentiments.
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Blu3j4yw4y
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(Original post by JW92)
There's a enormous difference between being coerced at the ballot box and casual conversation about politics. I think the latter is a very healthy approach to democracy and helps us move away from an electoral system based on family allegiances, class allegiances and tribal sentiments.
But it isn't always a casual conversation :dontknow: In fact when it comes to politics its quite rare to see a discussion without emotions flaring.

I agree that if you ask someone off-hand it's probably wrong to call it 'rude,' what I'm more saying is that there are very good reasons for keeping votes private and we shouldn't be pressuring those who wish to do so into sharing.
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