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    This great guide for the 'Routes in to Teaching', originally written by Peacey, is available on TSR Wiki for everyone to read and update.

    You can find it here: Routes in to Teaching




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    Hi People, though you might find a summary of the different routes into teaching useful - so I wrote one . I'll amend whenever I've got time. Click the name of the route for more info.

    Stickify if useful, let it die if not. :p:

    Love
    From
    Peacey.

    Degree in Main Subject + PGCE
    Length: 3 years + 1 year

    Funding Available: Bursary for PGCE (impact of top-up fees still not resolved)

    Qualified to Teach: Either KS1/2 (Primary) or KS3/4 (Secondary) or KS3/4/5 (Secondary and Sixth Form) – look carefully at the PGCE specification.

    Confers QTS? Yes, after an NQT year (done when you get your first real job)

    Notes: This is, by far, the most popular way of entering teaching. Get your degree first, and then apply through the GTTR to a university for a place on their PGCE. You’ll then typically do two “blocks” of teaching (the university will find your placements) and three blocks of lectured input, where you’ll complete assignments and learn about teaching approaches, planning, implementation and assessment and the legal and political frameworks which shape education.

    + Development of solid knowledge of your chosen subject
    + Relatively good emotional and academic support when doing your teaching practice
    - Only a basic coverage of educational theory – you’ll need to use insets and general reading to extend your knowledge if you want to be really innovative.
    - Reduced timetable whilst doing teaching practice doesn’t give you a proper experience of teaching workload.

    Degree in Main Subject + PGCE (Further, Higher and Adult Education) OR Cert. Ed.
    Length: 3 years (or 2 years if Cert Ed.) + 1 year

    Funding Available: Bursary for PGCE (impact of top-up fees still not resolved)

    Qualified to Teach: in Colleges, Universities, Prisons, Outreach Centres, etc.

    Confers QTS? NO

    Notes: The PGCE (Post-Compulsory) is geared towards those of you who want to teach outside of the compulsory sector. It’s like the normal PGCE, but you’ll learn specifically about teaching approaches for non-schoolies, and your teaching practices will not be in schools. It’s a useful point of entry for people who don’t want to teach National Curriculum subjects (especially if you want to teach a vocational subject or deal with adult basic skills, etc). The Cert. Ed. is aimed at more vocational subjects, and thus accepts HNDs and industry/professional experience in lieu of a degree. Be warned: you will not be qualified to teach in schools – even if you’re trying to teach just A-Level in schools. In these situations, you will be employed as an unqualified teacher, and possibly paid accordingly – and you will certainly not get a permanent contract until you requalify. The route is gaining more prestige, but I wouldn’t recommend it unless you’ve really looked into the implications of not having QTS.

    + Development of solid knowledge of your chosen subject
    + Relatively good emotional and academic support when doing your teaching practice
    + Specialised in teaching post-compulsory learners
    + Route into teaching non-national-curriculum subjects
    - Only a basic coverage of educational theory – you’ll need to use insets and general reading to extend your knowledge if you want to be really innovative.
    - Reduced timetable whilst doing teaching practice doesn’t give you a proper experience of teaching workload.
    - No QTS, which has implications for employment opportunities, pay and conditions (these are much worse outside schools).

    Degree in Main Subject + Graduate Teaching Programme
    Length: 3 years + 1 year

    Funding Available: Salary during GTP year (£14,000 + school can upgrade).

    Qualified to Teach: Either KS1/2 (Primary) or KS3/4 (Secondary) or KS3/4/5 (Secondary and Sixth Form) – look carefully at the PGCE specification.

    Confers QTS: Yes, after an NQT year (done when you get your first real job)

    Notes: The GTP was introduced as a more flexible route into teaching – basically by “training on the job”. Once you have completed your degree, you negotiate a year-long placement with a school (they provide your training) and talk to a Designated Recommended Body (DRB) to arrange funding and assessment of your skills. There is an "assessment only" route through the GTP which takes one term, but this is aimed at people with significant amounts of experience in education - such as those with the PGCE (Further, Higher and Adult Education) who want to gain QTS.

    + Development of solid knowledge of your chosen subject
    + Realistic insight into the realities and pressures of “being a teacher”
    + Better income whilst training
    + Likely to end up with a job automatically at the end of training.
    - You’ll be in at the deep end; schools will tend to treat you as a real teacher and heap work on you. You’ll also have very little emotional and academic support when compared to PGCEs.
    - You’ll need to negotiate your own placement before talking to the DRB about funding (and this is harder than it seems as schools don’t want to “babysit” trainees).

    Bachelor of Education (with QTS) & Bachelor of Arts (with QTS)
    Length: 4 Years or 3 Years (Depends on the course)

    Funding Available: As normal degree.

    Qualified to Teach: Primary OR Secondary

    Confers QTS: Yes, after an NQT year.

    Notes: This option lets you focus on the academic study of education, and you’ll go into a lot of depth on things like the psychology, philosophy and sociology of education as well as assessment practices, political and legal frameworks. You’ll normally do a series of teaching placements spread over the course – which will give you lots of time to hone your particular approach to teaching and enter the profession as a more skilful practitioner. However, you’ll have fewer opportunities to learn about your chosen subject area - limiting your employment opportunities and your subject-knowledge for when you teach. The BA(QTS) route is similar, but puts a bit more emphasis on subject-knowledge - I've also seen three-year BA(QTS) programmes.

    + Deep and rigorous study of education as an academic subject – provides a good insight into learning theory, assessment techniques, politics and philosophy of education, etc. Gives you a good head start if you want to become a really good, innovative teacher.
    + Lots of teaching practice (spread over the course), lets you develop your style and confidence.
    + Some schools (especially primaries) will prefer this qualification – but this is becoming less and less the case.
    - Less focus on your chosen subject specialism, and thus a less thorough understanding of subject knowledge.
    - Quirks in funding mean you won’t get a bursary for your fourth year – hence, more debts!
    - Potential career limitations (but this isn’t a major issue).

    Joint Honours Degree in Main Subject and Education Studies + PGCE
    Length: 3 Years + 1 Year

    Funding Available: As normal degree + Bursary for PGCE.

    Qualified to Teach: Either KS1/2 (Primary) or KS3/4 (Secondary) or KS3/4/5 (Secondary and Sixth Form) – look carefully at the PGCE specification.

    Confers QTS: Yes, after an NQT year.

    Notes: This isn’t a popular route, but it’s an interesting one. It lets you balance your main subject knowledge with knowledge of education, and without the additional debts of a four-year B.Ed. You won’t do teaching practice during your bachelor’s degree, but this means a more thorough and rigorous study of learning theory, etc – which will “spring into action” when you start your PGCE (and you’ll look loads cleverer than everyone else). I’m biased towards this route, as I did it! Now, you just find somewhere that does a B.A. in Education Studies…

    + Deep and rigorous study of education as an academic subject – provides a good insight into learning theory, assessment techniques, politics and philosophy of education, etc. Gives you a good head start if you want to become a really good, innovative teacher.
    + Development of solid knowledge of your chosen subject
    + Relatively good emotional and academic support when doing your teaching practice
    - Reduced timetable whilst doing teaching practice doesn’t give you a proper experience of teaching workload.
    - May be difficult to find universities that do the joint-honours B.A. in Education Studies

    Less Prevalent Options:
    Two Years of Higher Education + Registered Teacher Programme
    Length: 2 years + 2 years

    Funding Available: Salary during RTP year (£14,000 + school can upgrade).

    Qualified to Teach: Either KS1/2 (Primary) or KS3/4 (Secondary) or KS3/4/5 (Secondary and Sixth Form)

    Confers QTS: Yes, after an NQT year (done when you get your first real job)

    Notes: As Graduate Teacher Programme (GTP), but candidates only need to have completed two years of their degree. The teacher-training programme typically lasts two years although it is possible to complete it in a year (they complete their degree at the same time). I've not had any experience with this programme, or met anyone who's been through it, but I think it's targetted at maturer students (professional qualifications are accepted in lieu of a degree, and candidates are encouraged to do a one-year "top-up" degree). Schools are dubious of GTP candidates (with full degrees), and I suspect that RTP candidates (with only 2 years) will struggle to find placements.

    See here for more information.

    Degree + Fast Track PGCE
    Length: 3 Years + 1 Year (with extra twilight sessions)

    Funding Available: As normal degree + Bursary for PGCE.

    Qualified to Teach: Either KS1/2 (Primary) or KS3/4 (Secondary) or KS3/4/5 (Secondary and Sixth Form) – look carefully at the PGCE specification.

    Confers QTS: Yes, after an NQT year.

    Notes: Same as a normal PGCE, but with additional tutorials with the aim of preparing candidates to "rise through the ranks" at an accelerated speed. [CYNICAL]I've met people with Fast-Track PGCEs. I've also risen through the ranks more quickly than them with a regular PGCE :p: [/CYNICAL] Seriously, you can only rise through the ranks as quickly as leadership posts become available - and no amount of "extra training" can compensate for real teaching experience.

    TeachFirst
    Programme which aims to attract outstanding graduates to teaching in shortage areas (particularly more challenging schools in inner-London); it's an interesting programme, which will give you a real seat of the pants/make-or-break experience in difficult circumstances. Only open to a minority of applicants (high flyers/in london), but have a look here for more info nontheless. (thanks to Economic for the link)

    Other Stuff:
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    p.s. I wrote this whilst doing other things - by all means make corrections or disagree!
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    Thanks! That's really helpful
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    There are also the Registered Teacher Programme (RTP), fast-track PGCE and BA+QTS options.
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    (Original post by Economicz)
    You could also add tech first to that list maybe?
    Not sure what you mean :confused:
    (Original post by Endymion)
    There are also the Registered Teacher Programme (RTP), fast-track PGCE and BA+QTS options.
    Added!
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    I think my course is slightly different from what you've listed. Its a 4yr B.Ed where in you study your specialism (art!) and education studies jointly but you come out with QTS. There's no need for a pgce and no its not just added on at the end ala Cambridge.
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    (Original post by Economicz)
    You could also add tech first to that list maybe?
    Added. Thanks for the PM & Link.
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    There is also the option of a CertEd which prepares you for teaching in the F.E. sector.
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    (Original post by BellaCat)
    There is also the option of a CertEd which prepares you for teaching in the F.E. sector.
    Added it - I've lumped it in with the PGCE FE, (as far as I can see) trainers will offer both in parallel and channel candidates to either one or the other depending on experience and subject specialism.
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    mines a bsc with qts after 3 years and english as specialism subject but u can pick any specialism subject!
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    Ooh that is really helpful thank-you!
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    Mine is a 3yr B Ed specialising in science.
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    I thought this link may also be helpful. Maybe someone can add it to the top?

    Types of courses
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    (Original post by yourjoyismylow)
    I thought this link may also be helpful. Maybe someone can add it to the top?

    Types of courses
    dunnit
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    Wow Thanks, really great.
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    Can you get on a Primary PGCE course after doing a BA in Educational Studies?
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    Yep, if you've done a BA without QTS - I did it onto a secondary PGCE
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    Just a question, I'm currently doing a 4 year Ba(ed) primary teaching degree with an English specialism.

    If I decided to change the age group I would like to teach, i.e. High School children, is it possible to just to a PCGE? Or would I need to do a degree in a subject and then a PCGE?
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    (Original post by guitargirl03)
    Just a question, I'm currently doing a 4 year Ba(ed) primary teaching degree with an English specialism.

    If I decided to change the age group I would like to teach, i.e. High School children, is it possible to just to a PCGE? Or would I need to do a degree in a subject and then a PCGE?
    I think once you are have QTS, you cannot get on a PGCE. In your case it would probably be best to switch to a BA in English and then do a PGCE
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    (Original post by yourjoyismylow)
    I think once you are have QTS, you cannot get on a PGCE. In your case it would probably be best to switch to a BA in English and then do a PGCE
    Thank you!
 
 
 
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