Difference between Critically Damped and Over damped

Watch
This discussion is closed.
holyfather
Badges: 1
#1
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#1
Hey can anyone tell me the Difference between Critically Damped and Over damped oscillations? I get that critically damped means bringing the system back to its equilibrium position as soon as possible but isnt that wat over damped does as well?

Thank you
0
Stonebridge
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 10 years ago
#2
Overdamping returns the system to equilibrium in a time always greater than the critical damping.
The important point is that the critical damping gives the minimum time.
0
Dmon1Unlimited
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
(Original post by Stonebridge)
Overdamping returns the system to equilibrium in a time always greater than the critical damping.
The important point is that the critical damping gives the minimum time.
what about overdamping and heavy damping?

in my aqa a physics book it only shows heavy instead of overdamping (and shows it as one long line [dont think its oscillation]. yet in my revision guide it shows both overdamping and heavy damping, yet this time overdamping is the long line and heavy damping is just midway between critical and light damping
0
Stonebridge
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 9 years ago
#4
(Original post by Dmon1Unlimited)
what about overdamping and heavy damping?

in my aqa a physics book it only shows heavy instead of overdamping (and shows it as one long line [dont think its oscillation]. yet in my revision guide it shows both overdamping and heavy damping, yet this time overdamping is the long line and heavy damping is just midway between critical and light damping
Overdamping means the same as heavy damping. It's anything greater than the critical damping.
No damping - the oscillations continue for ever
Light (under) damping - the oscillations gradually die down to zero
Critical damping - no oscillations, the mass returns to equilibrium in the shortest time
Heavy (over) damping - no oscillations, the mass returns to equilibrium after a long time.

Image
3
Dmon1Unlimited
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 years ago
#5
(Original post by Stonebridge)
Overdamping means the same as heavy damping. It's anything greater than the critical damping.
No damping - the oscillations continue for ever
Light (under) damping - the oscillations gradually die down to zero
Critical damping - no oscillations, the mass returns to equilibrium in the shortest time
Heavy (over) damping - no oscillations, the mass returns to equilibrium after a long time.

Image
thank you
0
joyie
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
(Original post by Stonebridge)
Overdamping means the same as heavy damping. It's anything greater than the critical damping.
No damping - the oscillations continue for ever
Light (under) damping - the oscillations gradually die down to zero
Critical damping - no oscillations, the mass returns to equilibrium in the shortest time
Heavy (over) damping - no oscillations, the mass returns to equilibrium after a long time.

Image
hi, sorry to wake an old thread but i was just going over this topic. i understand the difference berween over damping and critical damping but i dont get why more damping would increase the time for the oscillations to decrease. it seems counter intuitive... in my head right now it seems that it would make more make sense if the time taken for oscillations to die away was inversely proportional to the amount of damping. could you please explain? thanks
0
Stonebridge
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by joyie)
hi, sorry to wake an old thread but i was just going over this topic. i understand the difference berween over damping and critical damping but i dont get why more damping would increase the time for the oscillations to decrease. it seems counter intuitive... in my head right now it seems that it would make more make sense if the time taken for oscillations to die away was inversely proportional to the amount of damping. could you please explain? thanks
There are no oscillations with critical and overdamping.
They don't die away. There aren't any.

What you are thinking of is light or under damping. See the graph.
Then what you say is true. With under damping, increasing the damping, causes the oscillations to die away more quickly.
0
joyie
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by Stonebridge)
There are no oscillations with critical and overdamping.
They don't die away. There aren't any.

What you are thinking of is light or under damping. See the graph.
Then what you say is true. With under damping, increasing the damping, causes the oscillations to die away more quickly.
sorry, not die away, but reach zero displacment/ equilibrium point. why does it take longer for overdamping to make the particle reach the point.
0
Stonebridge
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by joyie)
sorry, not die away, but reach zero displacment/ equilibrium point. why does it take longer for overdamping to make the particle reach the point.
Because the restoring force R is trying to get the mass back to equilibrium and the damping force F is trying to stop it. The resultant force pulling the mass back to equilibrium is R-F
More damping (F) means it's going to take longer.
0
kelvin macks
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
how do u explain critical damping in terms of restoring force and damping force? why the critical damping and overdamping has no oscillations?
0
uberteknik
  • Study Helper
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 months ago
#11
(Original post by Rishabh10225)
The spring is trying to bring the particle back towards the equilibrium position.In case of heavy damping, there will be greater resistance to the spring force and hence it will take longer to reach the equilibrium position.In case of critical damping, the resistive force is just enough to make the particle reach the equilibrium position in the minimum time possible.Hope that makes it clear.
This thread is 10 years old.
1
lordaxil
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
I guess you could say his response was overdamped.
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (119)
28.33%
No - I have already returned home (57)
13.57%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (81)
19.29%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (40)
9.52%
No - I live at home during term anyway (123)
29.29%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed