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    When a climax community is esrablished, for example a deciduous forest, the dominant species are said to be oak, birch. My question is, does the process of succession totally wipe out herbaceous plants, bushes and shrubs, or do they still exist in smaller numbers in the climax community?
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    (Original post by SIMZZ)
    When a climax community is esrablished, for example a deciduous forest, the dominant species are said to be oak, birch. My question is, does the process of succession totally wipe out herbaceous plants, bushes and shrubs, or do they still exist in smaller numbers in the climax community?
    im not completely sure coz that stuff is in the exam ill b doin at the end of jan but i dont think the climax community wipes out the smaller species i jus think it decreases the number of them, they shud still grow around the larger trees unless there's not enough light for them 2 do so. hope this helps. if not try searching succession on revision websites.
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    (Original post by SIMZZ)
    When a climax community is esrablished, for example a deciduous forest, the dominant species are said to be oak, birch. My question is, does the process of succession totally wipe out herbaceous plants, bushes and shrubs, or do they still exist in smaller numbers in the climax community?
    Aren't different parts of the community at different stages of succession? This would mean that some parts have reached climatic climax community, where others are somewhere between that and the start (bare rock). If it was all left to its own devices, over time, I think the Oak would prevail. I'm not exactly sure of this, AS Ecology was a while ago.
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    (Original post by timeofyourlife)
    Aren't different parts of the community at different stages of succession? This would mean that some parts have reached climatic climax community, where others are somewhere between that and the start (bare rock). If it was all left to its own devices, over time, I think the Oak would prevail. I'm not exactly sure of this, AS Ecology was a while ago.
    yeh im sure it wud dominate but it shudnt completely wipe out the smaller species i dont think.
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    (Original post by sspllr)
    yeh im sure it wud dominate but it shudnt completely wipe out the smaller species i dont think.
    Thats what i sort of thought. hey im doing ecology at the end of Jan. AQA syllabus. Im not looking forward to it, what syllabus are you with?
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    (Original post by SIMZZ)
    Thats what i sort of thought. hey im doing ecology at the end of Jan. AQA syllabus. Im not looking forward to it, what syllabus are you with?
    r u doin a whole exam on ecology?!! im on ocr n we hav r central concepts exam at the end of jan which has a small part on ecology n thats plenty 4 me, i h8 it!!
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    (Original post by sspllr)
    r u doin a whole exam on ecology?!! im on ocr n we hav r central concepts exam at the end of jan which has a small part on ecology n thats plenty 4 me, i h8 it!!
    Yep unfortuanately, the whole module is ecology, and its includes synpotic elements which is even better hooray!! i hope you do well and thanks for the helpxx
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    (Original post by SIMZZ)
    Yep unfortuanately, the whole module is ecology, and its includes synpotic elements which is even better hooray!! i hope you do well and thanks for the helpxx
    oh god! thanx, u 2.
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    hey, im doin OCR, but what i've learnt this is what i understand.
    Most of the smaller plant species get outcompeted by interspecific competition (between different species), as the bigger species shade, them and take their nutrients which overall reduces their photosynthesis rate and hence they die which reduces their number. so answering your question, some smaller species probably exist in small patches were they are not outcompeted by the larger species, but most probably get wiped out.

    i hope this answers your question!
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    (Original post by smatti)
    hey, im doin OCR, but what i've learnt this is what i understand.
    Most of the smaller plant species get outcompeted by interspecific competition (between different species), as the bigger species shade, them and take their nutrients which overall reduces their photosynthesis rate and hence they die which reduces their number. so answering your question, some smaller species probably exist in small patches were they are not outcompeted by the larger species, but most probably get wiped out.

    i hope this answers your question!
    Yeah i guess so, thanks matexx
 
 
 
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