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Considering dropping out of Uni to study Law watch

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    First of all any advice/help would be greatly appreciated.

    Background Info:

    I'm 21 years old now and I'm just about to finish the 2nd year of my Accounting course at the University of Nottingham. I knew from the end of my 1st year that I made mistake doing the subject but managed to get through the first year with a 2:2. I was persuaded by my parents to stick on with it and ended up going through my 2nd year. However as the 2nd year has progressed my motivation has drained to pretty much nothing.

    I've spent a long time thinking about what I would do if I did drop out, and have decided I would like to study Law. I expect it may be difficult having to study alongside 18 years old as a 21 yr old. But I'm not going to let personal embarrassment stand in the way of something I really want to do.

    On to the point:

    I have missed the application deadline for submitting an application through UCAS. However I also read that if I submit one before the end of June they'll still send them onto the Universities I picked, however the Unis have the right to just ignore them, so I'm probably going to give it a shot anyway.

    At College I achieved AAB and a B in an A/S subject in 2008. I've been scanning through all the Universities websites listed in the "Law league tables" thread as preferably I would like to study at a school with a decent reputation. However after checking through most of them I've seen they've all raise their Min requirements to AAA.

    So my first question is should I still have apply to some of them even though I've only got AAB? Or will they just auto reject me?

    Secondly can anyone recommend me a good Law school that will accept an AAB?

    Thanks for reading,
    James
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    Firstly don't let the age thing get to you. I've noticed that there are lot of 21 year olds amongst 18 year olds. For example a lot of the Greek guys are 20+ and are freshers because straight after school they have to serve 2 years in the army or something like that.

    Yeh Law is pretty hard to get into and a lot will want AAA and with so many achieving AAA you're gonna need a lot on your personal statement/interviews to make yourself stand out.

    It's a bit unfortunate that you have missed the deadline, it doesn't bode well. From the uni's point of view: you've dropped out of course - how do they know you won't do the same again? And you've missed the deadline - not good.
    And then AAB as well.

    I would recommend looking at joint Law courses if not straight law courses. Not to big up my own course but Law and Business at Warwick only required an AAB and its a really good course imo.
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    Hi, to be honest at this point in time I'd recommend applying to start 2011, and finish your current degree. That way A-levels don't matter so much as you'd be a gradate.
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    theres bares people on my course who are really old, and tbh if they hadnt told me i wouldnt have even known... so dont let that stand in your... maybe finish your accounting degree despite the lack of motivation, and then decide your next step from there... that way should you need to go find a job,you'll be qualified to do so
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    This will sound so awful and so unfair but my grandfather was a lawyer and said it's a rich, white and male dominated world.
    It's very difficult to break in if you're not all of the above.
    There was also that woman on 'How the other half live' who passed all her Law exams but couldn't go further as noone would take her on.
    Just think very carefully
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    I've read somewhere that LLB is not good if you don't plan to be a lawyer?
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    Thanks for the advice. I'm going to have a meeting with my student support officer at the Business School sometime tomorrow.

    I was ignorant of the fact that there were Law Degrees aimed at Graduates so I'm thinking about just finishing my degree then doing that as the best option now. Just checked the Notts site and they appear to offer a 2 year Law degree for grads, and it would be great if I could stay on to do that after I graduate from Accounting.

    Just need to make sure I get a 2:1 in Accounts now.
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    (Original post by KingJamesB)
    Thanks for the advice. I'm going to have a meeting with my student support officer at the Business School sometime tomorrow.

    I was ignorant of the fact that there were Law Degrees aimed at Graduates so I'm thinking about just finishing my degree then doing that as the best option now. Just checked the Notts site and they appear to offer a 2 year Law degree for grads, and it would be great if I could stay on to do that after I graduate from Accounting.

    Just need to make sure I get a 2:1 in Accounts now.
    Nottingham do offer a two year BA in law. So do Queen Mary University of London and Hull. Bristol and Sheffield both offer an MA in law for graduates with a degree in another discipline. You could also do the GDL, which would only take one year and would cost less money. (There are advantages to the two year course, as should be evident from the fact that I'm starting one in October). You need a 2:i for all of these, except for the course at Hull. There are also two year law degrees for graduates at Oxford and Cambridge, but the typical offer for both courses is a first; it sounds as though you aren't on track for a first, so it probably isn't worth your while to apply.

    Polaroid13 seems to have covered the territory pretty well, but make sure any degree you do is a qualifying degree.

    For what it's worth, I'll turn 23 shortly after starting my second degree in law. While I'm going to a mature students'/graduate students' college, I will have lectures (and conceivably supervisions) with 18 year olds, too. I'm not really fussed by it, and I don't think it should be cause for concern.

    Edit: Also, a friend on my first degree was 24 or 25 when he started.
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    i was 21 when i started my undergraduate degree. Don;t worry about age!
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    I would say finish your degree, probably better. But you do realise that all the top law schools do not accept anything less than AAA. So you may have to look lower down the peck, which does hamper your chances of a good job. In saying that don't worry about age, that's nothing. I don't know if you know but law is the most competitve course in the country.

    For TC/Pupillage you are looking to compete against 6,000+ applicants. So it may not be an easy way out and the chances of you getting employment will be considerably less than being an accountant. But in saying that if you have a passion for law then by all means give it a shot, but don't expect to have a job on the plate, it doesn't work like that.
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    Do your degree, get a 2.1 and GDL.
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    (Original post by Vodkaslur)
    This will sound so awful and so unfair but my grandfather was a lawyer and said it's a rich, white and male dominated world.
    It's very difficult to break in if you're not all of the above.
    There was also that woman on 'How the other half live' who passed all her Law exams but couldn't go further as noone would take her on.
    Just think very carefully
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    This is really outdated.

    Many, many successful 'ethnic' lawyers out there.
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    (Original post by Rai)
    This is really outdated.

    Many, many successful 'ethnic' lawyers out there.
    There are but it's still mainly a very white Oxford and Cambridge men dominated field.
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    (Original post by Vodkaslur)
    There are but it's still mainly a very white Oxford and Cambridge men dominated field.
    There are many more places in law firms than there are white Oxford and Cambridge graduates.

    Furthermore, I'm chinese, going to Oxford to study law, and everyone who I know that is on my course is a girl.

    :/
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    Law requires a lot of hard graft. If you can't force yourself to do the necessary boring work for accounting and blame it on a lack of motivation, you are probably going to be unable to force yourself to do all the necessary boring stuff in law. That's the reality. Only you can make that judgment, but you have to be prepared for the fact that a lot of the work you do will be boring and tough at the same time, and there is a lot of boring groundwork that needs to be done before the subject becomes interesting.
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    (Original post by Rai)
    This is really outdated.

    Many, many successful 'ethnic' lawyers out there.
    Most ethnic barristers are in the ghettos of law (Crime and Family Law ) unless they went to Oxfiord or Cambridge.
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    (Original post by Vodkaslur)
    There are but it's still mainly a very white Oxford and Cambridge men dominated field.
    White males are a minority at Oxbridge.

    Males at Oxbridge: 50%
    White males at Oxbridge: around 70% of the male population.
    Thus white males account for around 35% of the Oxbridge population.
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    (Original post by flugestuge)
    White males are a minority at Oxbridge.

    Males at Oxbridge: 50%
    White males at Oxbridge: around 70% of the male population.
    Thus white males account for around 35% of the Oxbridge population.
    That's why not all of them are lawyers ..
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    (Original post by Vodkaslur)
    There are but it's still mainly a very white Oxford and Cambridge men dominated field.
    No, really, it's not.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    No, really, it's not.
    Oh okay. You're right. I'm wrong. Happy?
 
 
 
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