Confused about my whole degree. Opinions needed. Watch

Apocalypti
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Hi everyone. I'm really confused right now about my whole degree.

Right, I got back a piece of coursework this morning, and was shocked at receiving a score of 90 (very high first) in one of my modules. The first line of my tutor's feedback stated: "This is arguably the best first year analysis that I have marked in nearly 40 years of teaching. I would have given this a clear First at Part II level, let alone Part I", "this is stunningly good" and "you also write extremely well while conducting a pretty detailed and precise level of analysis. Please take LING210 stylistics!"

This is all really good... but I've been considering for a while now to drop out of my linguistics degree and study a subject which leads me straight into employment. I really don't know how I'm going to get a job after this degree, and I'll be in tons of debt. I'm also in Lancaster at the moment, and really miss people from back home in London. I'm also on a year-abroad type degree, which means I'll have to move all the way to Canada this August/September for my 2nd year, then come back to Lancaster for a final year. I am homesick.

My alternative plan to this degree would be to spend next year getting science A Levels, and then getting myself onto a radiography degree in London and live at home (or renting somewhere cheap with my fiance), then move in with him once I get a permanent job. Whilst I'm not really talented in science, I reckon I could do above-average with some hard work and get a secure, stable job at the end.

I really don't know. I need an outsider's point of view. Should I continue this degree, move to Canada, knowing that I could probably do "well" in this subject, but not really sure about where this will lead me, job-wise... or start a science degree which will most likely get me a job at the end even though I will probably struggle?

The thing I want most is to get a job quickly so that I can move out with my boyfriend and start building a future with him. What could I do with this degree even if I got a 1st?

Help. Ask me questions if anything is unclear.
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furqan252
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very gud question. dats whre i am also confused dese days.. how u gona go nd live in canada .. moving aroud the world .. getting nothing ..
there are two options
1. masters in your interest degree but yours not profitable and beneficial in ur future career
2. jump into what you dont like but there is money and future.
is dat what u wana ask
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Billinge1991
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(Original post by Apocalypti)
Hi everyone. I'm really confused right now about my whole degree.

Right, I got back a piece of coursework this morning, and was shocked at receiving a score of 90 (very high first) in one of my modules. The first line of my tutor's feedback stated: "This is arguably the best first year analysis that I have marked in nearly 40 years of teaching. I would have given this a clear First at Part II level, let alone Part I", "this is stunningly good" and "you also write extremely well while conducting a pretty detailed and precise level of analysis. Please take LING210 stylistics!"

This is all really good... but I've been considering for a while now to drop out of my linguistics degree and study a subject which leads me straight into employment. I really don't know how I'm going to get a job after this degree, and I'll be in tons of debt. I'm also in Lancaster at the moment, and really miss people from back home in London. I'm also on a year-abroad type degree, which means I'll have to move all the way to Canada this August/September for my 2nd year, then come back to Lancaster for a final year. I am homesick.

My alternative plan to this degree would be to spend next year getting science A Levels, and then getting myself onto a radiography degree in London and live at home (or renting somewhere cheap with my fiance), then move in with him once I get a permanent job. Whilst I'm not really talented in science, I reckon I could do above-average with some hard work and get a secure, stable job at the end.

I really don't know. I need an outsider's point of view. Should I continue this degree, move to Canada, knowing that I could probably do "well" in this subject, but not really sure about where this will lead me, job-wise... or start a science degree which will most likely get me a job at the end even though I will probably struggle?

The thing I want most is to get a job quickly so that I can move out with my boyfriend and start building a future with him. What could I do with this degree even if I got a 1st?

Help. Ask me questions if anything is unclear.
If you got a first in linguistics you could be a language therapist. Actors have those sometimes to stop lisps and stutters. You might need a while of training. Or there are lots of places with graduate jobs.

The important thing (as I'm sure everyone has said) is to do what you enjoy doing. You clearly have a talent for what you're doing now. As you enjoy it, you'll be better able to get a jobs as your enthusiasm will come through in an interview. Plus the year abroad is definately something 'extra' to put on a cv.

My bf is doing a year abroad, we know it'll be tough, but worth it in the end when it's easier to get a job.

If you get a job in something you didn't initially enjoy it'll become really tedious and it'll make it harder to get a job because in an interview you won't be as enthusiastic as if it was the subject you really have a talent for.

I understand you missing people, but I guess it's just one of those things. They'll still be there when you go back though

Hope this helps
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Apocalypti
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(Original post by furqan252)
very gud question. dats whre i am also confused dese days.. how u gona go nd live in canada .. moving aroud the world .. getting nothing ..
there are two options
1. masters in your interest degree but yours not profitable and beneficial in ur future career
2. jump into what you dont like but there is money and future.
is dat what u wana ask
I don't know where a Masters would get me either. That just sounds like a straight path to academia, which I don't think I want.

The thing with science is that I don't think I'm hideously bad at it, but my boyfriend and close friend are both doing science degrees and they have 'talent' in it, but even they need to work hard. So I'd probably need to work twice as hard as them to do well.
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furqan252
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if u want to do sciene degree i think there is no money involved .. u need huge years of experiances .. studying at top unis ... because u have to look for job at the end .. if there is no much trend of that kind of job u looking for .. what u gona do after studying 16 years in ur interst subject ? i mean de desirble JOB
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Apocalypti
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(Original post by Billinge1991)
If you got a first in linguistics you could be a language therapist. Actors have those sometimes to stop lisps and stutters. You might need a while of training. Or there are lots of places with graduate jobs.

The important thing (as I'm sure everyone has said) is to do what you enjoy doing. You clearly have a talent for what you're doing now. As you enjoy it, you'll be better able to get a jobs as your enthusiasm will come through in an interview. Plus the year abroad is definately something 'extra' to put on a cv.

My bf is doing a year abroad, we know it'll be tough, but worth it in the end when it's easier to get a job.

If you get a job in something you didn't initially enjoy it'll become really tedious and it'll make it harder to get a job because in an interview you won't be as enthusiastic as if it was the subject you really have a talent for.

I understand you missing people, but I guess it's just one of those things. They'll still be there when you go back though

Hope this helps
Language therapists need to do a degree in Speech and Language Therapy, but I have considered that as a job, and it isn't something that really appeals to me. I am a kind of person who prefers patient contact over a relatively short period of time, rather than being with one patient for hours day after day.

How do you cope with the long distance btw? Where is his year abroad?
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Otter71
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Sounds like you've got a real flair for the linguistics and you admit yourself that maybe radiography (or at least the science part of it) may not be your thing. I therefore suggest that it would be the wrong thing to do the radiography if your heart is so obviously not in it. Healthcare is hard work, and you don't want to go into that if your heart isn't in it.
The right career move in the wrong location is something that can be rectified far sooner and easier than the wrong career move in the right location, which will only leave resentment that you moved to be with your fiance I suspect especially if he's earning a lot more than you in the future even if that's just because of other family issues.
I don't know how old you are but assuming you're nearer twenty than forty, I'd suspect you've got plenty of time for the fiance and all that entails - and going to Canada, whilst a bit wrench will test the relationship so that when you DO get back you're 100% sure that's what you want. It may also mean that he gets a cheap holiday or three out there during the year.
You may find that the basis of your homesickness is that you're keeping yourself in and not enjoying yourself for fear of meeting someone else who might be interested in you, albeit you know you won't want them. I know people who did that and suffered as a result with LDRs, but I also knew a few who went out and enjoyed themselves anyhow, though I suspect that needed one to be far stronger in resolve. Don't know if that makes any sense to you.
As for not knowing what to do with the degree - I suspect that goes for a lot of your colleagues too and things will become clear as time goes on...

Good luck!
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Billinge1991
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(Original post by Apocalypti)
Language therapists need to do a degree in Speech and Language Therapy, but I have considered that as a job, and it isn't something that really appeals to me. I am a kind of person who prefers patient contact over a relatively short period of time, rather than being with one patient for hours day after day.

How do you cope with the long distance btw? Where is his year abroad?
He hasn't gone yet, he's leaving in August/September. Only in Prague, so not as far away, I know. Probably will cope by having a weekly skype convo at least

Hmm...well not language therapy because of patient contact; but you'd rather do radiography?! Ha ha, fairy nuff I guess.

I guess there's this site: http://www.linguistsdirect.com/jobs-for-linguists.html they'd probs help more than me. One of my friends did linguistics and ended up working for IBM with 40k a year.
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Apocalypti
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(Original post by furqan252)
if u want to do sciene degree i think there is no money involved .. u need huge years of experiances .. studying at top unis ... because u have to look for job at the end .. if there is no much trend of that kind of job u looking for .. what u gona do after studying 16 years in ur interst subject ? i mean de desirble JOB
OK I didn't really understand most of that, but if it helps clarify things, the science degree I'm looking at has low entry requirements, and there's a large shortage of radiographers in the NHS. University reputation isn't a factor for healthcare jobs either, as all the degrees are regulated by an external body (rather like medicine, architecture etc.)
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thatsnumberwang
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your teacher fancies you
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Apocalypti
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(Original post by Billinge1991)
He hasn't gone yet, he's leaving in August/September. Only in Prague, so not as far away, I know. Probably will cope by having a weekly skype convo at least
Good luck. Weekly contact? I don't think I could cope with that!
Hmm...well not language therapy because of patient contact; but you'd rather do radiography?! Ha ha, fairy nuff I guess.
With diagnostic radiography, patient contact is quite different to the patient contact involved in speech & language therapy. You see a lot of patients, but for only a short amount of time each.
I guess there's this site: http://www.linguistsdirect.com/jobs-for-linguists.html they'd probs help more than me. One of my friends did linguistics and ended up working for IBM with 40k a year.
Thanks for that list. Is your friend bilingual? Unfortuantely I'm not bilingual so I guess my options are pretty limited in that sense aswell.
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Flicker
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I had the best time of my life when I studied abroad in Canada, even with a boyfriend at home. Go for whatever you love. If you enjoy linguistics, stick with it! You're obviously good at it. If you want to change because you don't enjoy it and there's something else you're passionate about go for that, but if you're just changing to "get a job" you still won't be happy and thus you won't do as well, decreasing job prospects!

I also wouldn't recommend changing just to be nearer your fiance, as if you ended up not enjoying the course you could feel resentful towards him for causing you to move.

Also: speech and language therapists see loads of patients! it depends what setting you're in - school or clinic or community or hospital...
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Billinge1991
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(Original post by Apocalypti)
Good luck. Weekly contact? I don't think I could cope with that!

With diagnostic radiography, patient contact is quite different to the patient contact involved in speech & language therapy. You see a lot of patients, but for only a short amount of time each.


Thanks for that list. Is your friend bilingual? Unfortuantely I'm not bilingual so I guess my options are pretty limited in that sense aswell.
No, not just weekly contact, emails and phone calls etc, but a big ol' skype convo at one promised time a week, then even if we're busy we have that to look forward to. There will be other contact, but that one is a constant at one time a week.

Hmm...yeah, but with diagnostic radiography, you're finding out what diseases people have...do you really want to be seeing a lot of that? Don't your uni publish lists of what people with your degree go on to do?

My friend is more than bilingual :p: lol. To be honest, I think that helps with most jobs though, sorry I just assumed something like that could be easy money .
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morecambebay
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I dont see what there is to be confused about. Your lecturer has just told you that you are one of the best students he has taught for years. Stick with it, graduate at the top of your year, get him to do your referance, take your pick of jobs that dont require a specific degree.
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Apocalypti
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(Original post by Becky Stothart)
The right career move in the wrong location is something that can be rectified far sooner and easier than the wrong career move in the right location, which will only leave resentment that you moved to be with your fiance I suspect especially if he's earning a lot more than you in the future even if that's just because of other family issues.
I don't really know if it's the right career move. I have no people skills, I will pretty much fail on the work experience front, I'm worried I'll be stuck in a dead end job forever. I'm not really "into" this subject either, I just happen to be good at it with not that much effort.
You may find that the basis of your homesickness is that you're keeping yourself in and not enjoying yourself for fear of meeting someone else who might be interested in you, albeit you know you won't want them. I know people who did that and suffered as a result with LDRs, but I also knew a few who went out and enjoyed themselves anyhow, though I suspect that needed one to be far stronger in resolve. Don't know if that makes any sense to you.
I know what you're getting at, though I don't really feel like I'm trying to avoid anyone who might be interested in me lol. It's more of the case that I generally find it hard to make friends.
As for not knowing what to do with the degree - I suspect that goes for a lot of your colleagues too and things will become clear as time goes on...
I sometimes feel really unhappy until I know that I have a direction or aim to persue. At the moment I just feel lost, like I'm doing things without purpose.
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Apocalypti
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(Original post by morecambebay)
I dont see what there is to be confused about. Your lecturer has just told you that you are one of the best students he has taught for years. Stick with it, graduate at the top of your year, get him to do your referance, take your pick of jobs that dont require a specific degree.
The jobs that don't require a specific degree strike me as working for a business/company for the rest of my life, which doesn't appeal to me.
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Apocalypti
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(Original post by Billinge1991)
No, not just weekly contact, emails and phone calls etc, but a big ol' skype convo at one promised time a week, then even if we're busy we have that to look forward to. There will be other contact, but that one is a constant at one time a week.
Oh I see, that sounds good.
Hmm...yeah, but with diagnostic radiography, you're finding out what diseases people have...do you really want to be seeing a lot of that?
Hell yeah, it sounds a lot more interesting than analysing a piece of novel/play/poetry.
My friend is more than bilingual lol. To be honest, I think that helps with most jobs though, sorry I just assumed something like that could be easy money .
Yeah that's where I fail. I study languages, but only speak one. :rolleyes: :p:

My uni do publish lists, though haven't really seen any yet. I know that the usual paths are lexicographer, academia, teaching, media, journalism etc. but although journalism doesn't sound too bad, I would prefer a job which is more hands-on, and practical, rather than purely academic or just involves sitting at a desk.
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riotgrrl
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(Original post by Apocalypti)
The jobs that don't require a specific degree strike me as working for a business/company for the rest of my life, which doesn't appeal to me.
Have you thought about primary school teaching? Working in the civil service? Working for a charity? Do a little bit of research and don't write off all the graduate jobs that don't require a specific degree- you might find one you really like.

You should stick with what you're good at. You don't have a problem with your degree, you just have a problem with your potential career- and that can be resolved more easily than by dropping out and taking science a levels. You'll lose a lot of money that way, too. Why don't you drop in on your careers advisor at uni and talk it through with them? They might be able to give you some guidance.
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Apocalypti
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(Original post by riotgrrl)
Have you thought about primary school teaching? Working in the civil service? Working for a charity? Do a little bit of research and don't write off all the graduate jobs that don't require a specific degree- you might find one you really like.
Primary school teaching? Teaching children basic maths and English doesn't appeal to me. Being a civil servant? Admin and general management sounds really boring to me. I have done plenty of research, but nothing really stands out to me apart from a few jobs in healthcare where I can be part of the process of helping someone recover from a brain tumour, fractured rib, etc.
You should stick with what you're good at. You don't have a problem with your degree, you just have a problem with your potential career- and that can be resolved more easily than by dropping out and taking science a levels. You'll lose a lot of money that way, too. Why don't you drop in on your careers advisor at uni and talk it through with them? They might be able to give you some guidance.
I think I will go and see my careers advisor. As for the money situation, I'd waste a lot more money on my year abroad and finishing this degree, rather than starting radiography (the degree is free), plus living at home would mean no living costs either.

I don't know. I'll see how my first year exams go, and if I average a high 2.1 I'll consider carrying on. I just can't find any motivation though when my mind is elsewhere.
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Billinge1991
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(Original post by Apocalypti)
Oh I see, that sounds good.

Hell yeah, it sounds a lot more interesting than analysing a piece of novel/play/poetry.

Yeah that's where I fail. I study languages, but only speak one. :rolleyes: :p:

My uni do publish lists, though haven't really seen any yet. I know that the usual paths are lexicographer, academia, teaching, media, journalism etc. but although journalism doesn't sound too bad, I would prefer a job which is more hands-on, and practical, rather than purely academic or just involves sitting at a desk.
Hmm, if you want something more practical...

It just seems a shame to waste such an obvious talent for your course, while I'm sure you'd manage perfectly well in other areas, there must have been an attraction to the course in the first place...and I think this would come through in a job interview.

Maybe looking into a company that does graduate training if you're not completely devoted to the linguistics field? A lot of companies don't care what your degree is, but they'll pay you to be trained, and I'm sure there are a lot of them in London
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