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Cooking is such a nightmare watch

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    Yes I am a student, but no I don't want to live off pasta and sauce the whole time. How do you come up with ideas about what to cook that is cheap, quick and healthy? Urgh, it's such a chore! :rolleyes: A friend told me about Spoonfed Suppers. Does anyone use this site?
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    I just take all the products I have and leave everything else to my imagination :laugh:
    As long as you know the things you like and dislike, you can surely think of something. I've never heard of the site you mentioned, but there certainly are a lot of recipes online.
    Cooking is a form of creation in a way, why don't you look at it from that perspective :p:
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    im in my first year, i cant cook i tend to have pasta, chicken+korma sauce+rice, baked potatoes with tuna mayo n sweetcorn, fish fingers/chicken and wedges, soup etc, i dunno, get a recipe book therell be loads of ideas in there. or here http://www.beyondbakedbeans.com/ in reply to the spoonfed suppers thing nope havent used that site, if its what it sounds like tho and just brings you dinners i dont recommend it, be independent and learn to cook.
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    Even pasta with sauce was too much effort for me haha.

    Micro chips and pizza is what I lived on. Food in 4 minutes. bangin'!
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    I don't see why people think it's such a chore... If you enjoy food, then it shouldn't be such an issue, and even more so if you actually want to know what goes into your food.

    You could always cook up a bit pot of spag bol/chili/soup/anything else you can think of at the start of the week, and then freeze individual portions so you can have a decent dinner when you need to rather than buying ready meals which are, for the most part, repulsive...
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    chicken's always a good start if you're not vegetarian (or quorn if you are)... curries, mini roasts, stir fry, pasta, sandwiches... they can be healthy if you're not adding creams/loads of oil to it and they're relatively easy to make...
    Generally for my chicken curry it was just onions and peppers in a wok, add the chicken or whatever and cook through, add a tin of chopped tomatoes, puree and curry powder/spices and cook for another 10 mins... that works with anything really - just change the spices or sauce...
    It's also freezable so you can make up a lot and then separate into smaller portions... that way you get a few meals out of relatively few ingredients...
    Bags of frozen chicken are quite a bit cheaper than the refridgerated so you get more for your money...
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    But this http://www.livsstil.co.uk/images/upl...01%20split.jpg

    buy these: http://coolrain44.files.wordpress.co...bles_mixed.jpg

    buy this: http://www.comparestoreprices.co.uk/...nder-hb665.jpg

    buy these: http://margaretsmusings.files.wordpr...fruit_tray.jpg

    end.
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    The problem is, people don't seem to realise that there is a happy place in between just eating crappy ready meals every night and getting out a recipe book every time we want a snack.


    The first thing you need to do is to go to the supermarket and buy a load of basic components (mainly either frozen or dry) - a selection of meat, selection of carbs, selection of veg, selection of spices and condiments. Then just think of a meal you like and cook it. It's really not rocket science.
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    I know the Spoonfed Suppers site. (www.spoonfedsuppers.com). It's AMAZING! You have to join. When you join up, it encourages you to get some staple stuff (rice, pasta, some spices etc) and then you can get going! It emails you a recipe every evening that is calorie and fat counted - so you don't have to worry about that side. And the meals always take less than 30 mins and is really varied. I have cooked curries, spaghetti, posh nosh, comfort stuff. It's great. Really learning alot about cooking along the way. Really recommend it.

    2 things though - it's based around a fictional 1950s character - which I think is really cool, different, fun. But might not be your thing. Also emails are daily. So if you don't go into your email very often - you'll suddenly find a little pile of them!
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    -Buy up basic staple foods at the start of the year (especially if your parents do a shop for you). The first few shops can be expensive, but when you've got plenty of storecupboard foods, then it'll be a lot easier. Things like pasta, rice, salt, pepper, noodles, tinned foods (baked beans beans, soup, chopped tomatoes, chickpeas), herbs and spices, stock cubes, flour, sugar). Sometimes when you look at a recipe, it seems like there are a lot of ingredients, but if you're well stocked up on basic stuff, you won't have to buy too much.

    -Plan your meals for the week (or at least 3 or 4 days ahead). It might take half an hour or so, but once you've done it, you don't have to think about it for the rest of the week. It also means you can just do one big shop, instead of ending up having to buy overpriced sandwiches on campus one day because you've run out of food.

    -Learn to cook a few simple things that you like, and that can be made in bulk. Bolognese or chilli is obviously a good one - you can make enough for 3 or 4 meals easily, and store it in tupperware in the fridge, or in the freezer if you want it to last for longer. Same with curries, which you can make using jars of paste, combined with chopped tomatoes and whatever you want to put in it (chickpeas are good for protein, cheapness and fillingness). These options require you to put in a bit of effort once or twice a week, but after that you just have to heat them up, and cook pasta/rice to go with them. You could do pasta bake too: cook pasta, mix with frozen veg, fried bacon bits, and cheese sauce, put in an oven dish and add grated cheese on top. Obviously you can do so many variants on this.

    -Stir fries are pretty good. Buy the packs of ready chopped veg from the supermarket, and a large one of those will do you for about 3 meals. Just cook noodles, then fry veg and add noodles and sauce.

    -Jacket potatoes are an easy and cheap option. A pack of 4 large potatoes is around 70p in Tesco. You can either cook them in the oven for about an hour and a half, or microwave for 10 minutes then crisp up in the oven. It's not the quickest meal in the world ever, but it couldn't be much simpler! Tuna is fairly expensive, but baked beans aren't. And you could always pad tuna out by mixing it with sweetcorn.
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    Cooking is my favorite chores when I'm at home, If you're having a hard time cooking you can actually use your internet to search some cooking instructions with minimal amount to spend and easy to prepare. Try to search them Good luck.
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    (Original post by Keziah)
    -Buy up basic staple foods at the start of the year (especially if your parents do a shop for you). The first few shops can be expensive, but when you've got plenty of storecupboard foods, then it'll be a lot easier. Things like pasta, rice, salt, pepper, noodles, tinned foods (baked beans beans, soup, chopped tomatoes, chickpeas), herbs and spices, stock cubes, flour, sugar). Sometimes when you look at a recipe, it seems like there are a lot of ingredients, but if you're well stocked up on basic stuff, you won't have to buy too much.

    -Plan your meals for the week (or at least 3 or 4 days ahead). It might take half an hour or so, but once you've done it, you don't have to think about it for the rest of the week. It also means you can just do one big shop, instead of ending up having to buy overpriced sandwiches on campus one day because you've run out of food.

    -Learn to cook a few simple things that you like, and that can be made in bulk. Bolognese or chilli is obviously a good one - you can make enough for 3 or 4 meals easily, and store it in tupperware in the fridge, or in the freezer if you want it to last for longer. Same with curries, which you can make using jars of paste, combined with chopped tomatoes and whatever you want to put in it (chickpeas are good for protein, cheapness and fillingness). These options require you to put in a bit of effort once or twice a week, but after that you just have to heat them up, and cook pasta/rice to go with them. You could do pasta bake too: cook pasta, mix with frozen veg, fried bacon bits, and cheese sauce, put in an oven dish and add grated cheese on top. Obviously you can do so many variants on this.

    -Stir fries are pretty good. Buy the packs of ready chopped veg from the supermarket, and a large one of those will do you for about 3 meals. Just cook noodles, then fry veg and add noodles and sauce.

    -Jacket potatoes are an easy and cheap option. A pack of 4 large potatoes is around 70p in Tesco. You can either cook them in the oven for about an hour and a half, or microwave for 10 minutes then crisp up in the oven. It's not the quickest meal in the world ever, but it couldn't be much simpler! Tuna is fairly expensive, but baked beans aren't. And you could always pad tuna out by mixing it with sweetcorn.

    This is good advice, especially the first bit about doing a big shop to fill up your cupboards at the start of the year.

    I never can be bothered cooking in bulk though. Why would you want to eat the same thing for three dinners in a row? What if you fancied something different. Personally I don't like reheating stuff either, I would rather cook it fresh.

    My normal plan is to shop on Saturday morning where I normally spend 15-20 quid,, and buy enough fresh food to feed me until about Wednesday night, then knock something up from the freezer on thursday and friday if I'm eating in. That was nothing goes to waste, and I get to eat cheap, fresh, healthy food for the majority of my meals.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    This is good advice, especially the first bit about doing a big shop to fill up your cupboards at the start of the year.

    I never can be bothered cooking in bulk though. Why would you want to eat the same thing for three dinners in a row? What if you fancied something different. Personally I don't like reheating stuff either, I would rather cook it fresh.

    My normal plan is to shop on Saturday morning where I normally spend 15-20 quid,, and buy enough fresh food to feed me until about Wednesday night, then knock something up from the freezer on thursday and friday if I'm eating in. That was nothing goes to waste, and I get to eat cheap, fresh, healthy food for the majority of my meals.
    i cook in bulk and it goes in the freezer i dont have it 3 times in a row - i may have something else for a few days
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    stuck for ideas? just stick in the ingredients you've got to hand and see what comes up!

    http://www.supercook.com/
 
 
 
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