Do Oxbridge care about attendance? Watch

yellowmeringue
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
This is going to seem like a really stupid question.

Does Oxbridge care about school attendance? I have always been very good, but it's slipped to about 90% this year.

Is attendance something I will have to be careful about in the Sixth Form? Thanks
0
reply
overtherainbow
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
i guess it depends what your school writes in your reference if they dont mention it youd be fine but it wouldnt give a great impression if they said you were constantly away with no reason. i doubt theyd be overly bothered though
0
reply
im so academic
Badges: 13
#3
Report 8 years ago
#3
(Original post by yellowmeringue)
This is going to seem like a really stupid question.

Does Oxbridge care about school attendance? I have always been very good, but it's slipped to about 90% this year.

Is attendance something I will have to be careful about in the Sixth Form? Thanks
:rofl: No.

Interview, academic potential, passion, enthusiasm, admission tests etc matters.

For the record, irrelevant extra curriculars don't matter either.
reply
John Locke
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
doubt it, mine isn't great..
0
reply
hobnob
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report 8 years ago
#5
(Original post by yellowmeringue)
This is going to seem like a really stupid question.

Does Oxbridge care about school attendance? I have always been very good, but it's slipped to about 90% this year.

Is attendance something I will have to be careful about in the Sixth Form? Thanks
Unless your attendance is so bad that your referee feels he has to slip a nasty remark about hardly knowing what you look like because you've got so little time for school into your reference, it won't matter. And that's not very likely to happen, is it?
0
reply
Rubgish
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report 8 years ago
#6
(Original post by im so academic)
:rofl: No.

Interview, academic potential, passion, enthusiasm, admission tests etc matters.

For the record, irrelevant extra curriculars don't matter either.
Actually attendence does matter. If you have a bad reference they will notice, and it will reduce your chance of getting an offer, however this would only happen if you are on the edge of getting an offer. If everything else is right, you'll be fine, but if a couple of things look wrong, having bad attendance mentioned on your reference could easily swap the balance.

As it is, 90% attendance is fine, so I wouldn't worry about it. Just turn up to all the lessons you can/need to.
0
reply
Becky21
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report 8 years ago
#7
They won't know unless it's mentioned in your reference, and you'd have to have a really mean teacher to mention it at 90%. Mine's always been below 90% and it wasn't mentioned in mine.
0
reply
Elementric
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 8 years ago
#8
No, as long as your referee doesn't mention it. Even if they did, it's unlikely that the university would be bothered about it.
0
reply
im so academic
Badges: 13
#9
Report 8 years ago
#9
(Original post by Rubgish)
Actually attendence does matter. If you have a bad reference they will notice, and it will reduce your chance of getting an offer, however this would only happen if you are on the edge of getting an offer. If everything else is right, you'll be fine, but if a couple of things look wrong, having bad attendance mentioned on your reference could easily swap the balance.

As it is, 90% attendance is fine, so I wouldn't worry about it. Just turn up to all the lessons you can/need to.
But not to the certain extent that it determines whether you get the offer or not, i.e. it is NOT a deciding factor.

I'd imagine they'd rather they took on a student who had "poor" attendance but excellent academic potential; compared to a student who had 100% but poor academic potential.

Excellent attendance will NEVER make up for poor academic potential.

In fact, I'd disagree with your statement totally - nowhere on the Cambridge website does it say they take attendance into consideration. So how the hell will it "reduce the chances of getting an offer" if you are on the "edge of getting the offer"?

What determines if you get the offer or not is if your better than the other candidate or not.

In fact, I would argue that school references are supposed to focus on academic matters and another could argue that there are many schools that do not write anything about attendance on references.

How can they make that a deciding factor is they can't see the attendances of all the students?

In addition, one could have **** attendance but the most amazing potential. How the hell is >90% attendance evidence that one will suceed at Cambridge?
reply
im so academic
Badges: 13
#10
Report 8 years ago
#10
(Original post by Elementric)
No, as long as your referee doesn't mention it. Even if they did, it's unlikely that the university would be bothered about it.
Agreed.
reply
BJack
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 8 years ago
#11
(Original post by Blu3j4yw4y)
Sorry to go a little bit off topic, but do you normally get to chose your referee and do you get to see their reference?
You can choose your referee if you apply as a private candidate (ie not through your school) but you probably won't get a say in who it is if you apply through your school. You can pay UCAS to see your reference, or ask your referee nicely and they should oblige.
0
reply
Topaz_eyes
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report 8 years ago
#12
Um, my friend has an offer from Oxford and probably has <50% attendance!! Mind you, my school probably just didn't mention it in his reference...

However, I strongly advise going to ALL your lessons - that's the best way of learning
0
reply
John Locke
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#13
Report 8 years ago
#13
(Original post by Topaz_eyes)
Um, my friend has an offer from Oxford and probably has <50% attendance!! Mind you, my school probably just didn't mention it in his reference...

However, I strongly advise going to ALL your lessons - that's the best way of learning
depends how good your quality of teaching is...
0
reply
MathsHamster
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#14
Report 8 years ago
#14
(Original post by yellowmeringue)
This is going to seem like a really stupid question.

Does Oxbridge care about school attendance? I have always been very good, but it's slipped to about 90% this year.

Is attendance something I will have to be careful about in the Sixth Form? Thanks
No, there's no way for them to find out, unless your attendance is so bad (and I mean REALLY bad) that your school put it on your reference. Our school electronic registration system is so messed up that my attendance last term was recorded as being 21%, it didn't make any difference to me. Oxbridge would rather have a clever, enthusiastic candidate who can think on their feet and only goes to school once a week than a thick candidate with 100% attendance. 90% attendance is still really good, tbh, and they don't care how you get the grades as long as you get them.
0
reply
Rubgish
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#15
Report 8 years ago
#15
(Original post by im so academic)
But not to the certain extent that it determines whether you get the offer or not, i.e. it is NOT a deciding factor.

I'd imagine they'd rather they took on a student who had "poor" attendance but excellent academic potential; compared to a student who had 100% but poor academic potential.

Excellent attendance will NEVER make up for poor academic potential.

In fact, I'd disagree with your statement totally - nowhere on the Cambridge website does it say they take attendance into consideration. So how the hell will it "reduce the chances of getting an offer" if you are on the "edge of getting the offer"?

What determines if you get the offer or not is if your better than the other candidate or not.

In fact, I would argue that school references are supposed to focus on academic matters and another could argue that there are many schools that do not write anything about attendance on references.

How can they make that a deciding factor is they can't see the attendances of all the students?

In addition, one could have **** attendance but the most amazing potential. How the hell is >90% attendance evidence that one will suceed at Cambridge?
Every factor is taken into consideration. I've said its not important in most situations, maybe if you took the time to read what I wrote you would have realised that.

You have to consider that just because it isn't explicitly stated on the cambridge website doesn't mean they don't take it into consideration. Your attendance can be part of your reference, and they do take your reference into consideration. If your teacher says "Blah may have potential, but they don't use it because they never turn up to lessons and don't put the effort in", do you think they will just ignore that? Yes potential is important, but you could have the best potential in the world and not use it.

Your opinion on what should or should not be on a reference is not relevent here, if your teacher decides to give you a bad reference they will read it and they will note it. I'm sure you are one of these people who claim personal statements are pointless and that the admissions tutors never read them, of which you would also be wrong.

And if you haven't worked it out yet, if the admissions tutors are trying to decide between two candidates, and one has a good reference saying they turn up regularly and are willing to work, versus someone who doesn't regularly turn up and doesn't seem willing to put any effort in, who do you think they are going to pick?
0
reply
thenewromance1234
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#16
Report 8 years ago
#16
I had 50-60% attendance and I got an offer, so I wouldn't worry.
0
reply
im so academic
Badges: 13
#17
Report 8 years ago
#17
(Original post by Rubgish)
Every factor is taken into consideration. I've said its not important in most situations, maybe if you took the time to read what I wrote you would have realised that.
Yeah they might it into consideration, but honestly, they do not give a damn. In fact, I will email Cambridge and Oxford to prove they don't give a **** about attendance.

You have to consider that just because it isn't explicitly stated on the cambridge website doesn't mean they don't take it into consideration.
********.

That would mean they are practically "conning" pupils. Why would they take something into consideration and not say it? That means many gifted A-level students could be at a disadvantage because they did not know attendance was taken into consideration.

Your attendance can be part of your reference, and they do take your reference into consideration.
http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/news/pres...dmissions.html

"They offer places to the ones they believe have the most academic potential and are best suited to the course in question."

Not if they have the best attendance.

They are looking for: "Academic potential and aptitude for studying the chosen subject at degree level..."; "Enthusiasm for and commitment to the chosen course..."; "Motivation and self-discipline..."

Good attendance is not a sign of motivation and self-discipline. OK, maybe a sign of motivation and self-discipline to go to school, but for their "chosen subject at degree level"? Not necessarily.

I'm backing up my statements using evidence from the Cambridge website (they go into more detail than Oxford). Then you state anything you deem logical from your brain.

If your teacher says "Blah may have potential, but they don't use it because they never turn up to lessons and don't put the effort in", do you think they will just ignore that?
"Admissions tutors take a 'holistic' approach, taking into account all the available information about an applicant".

They would not reject an applicant based on that only.

Also, how the hell can Oxbridge trust the school reference? It's a bit like the personal statement. The personal statement can easily include lies from the applicant and be plagarised; who's to say that the school reference is the gospel truth about the applicant?

In addition, the referee could be biased against the applicant, which would prove an unfair disadvantage against the applicant and I presume Oxbridge would know not. The school reference is not gospel truth.

In fact, using your example, "has potential... don't use it". Maybe they don't use it in class because they think the A-level curriculum is uninspiring, but who is to say that they don't use their potential outside of school through extra reading and relevant extra-curriculars which the referee is unaware of?

"never turns up to lessons" - well, if you don't turn up to lesson, how would the candidate get excellent grades at AS. Let's be honest, good grades at AS is practically a necessity as Cambridge do take that into account. So that's ********. There's also the possibility that the quality of teaching is poor at their school, so they might as well self-teach at home and therefore they do not "turn up to lessons". Don't be so cynical.

"don't put effort in". Again - they might not put as much effort into their work as they find the A-level curriculum. In fact, I would argue that that statement is not a true statement. Again - chances are this applicant has to have good grades at AS to be even considered, so they must have put some sort of effort into their work to get the grades needed to apply for Cambridge. So that's ********.

Can you see why Oxbridge does not take the school reference as gospel truth? It's an indication of what the student is like, but Oxbridge will make their minds up through the interviews.

Yes potential is important, but you could have the best potential in the world and not use it.
Who is to say they don't use it?

IN FACT, they might not even have had the opportunity to have used their potential, so if anything, it could even be a positive thing as the admission tutors will see that their potential has gone unnoticed and perhaps benefit from an Oxbridge degree.

Your opinion on what should or should not be on a reference is not relevent here, if your teacher decides to give you a bad reference they will read it and they will note it.
Define a "bad statement". One that insults the pupils? One that does not mention a single positive quality about the applicant?

In addition, you're twisting your words: there's a big different to taking attendance account, in comparision to taking the school reference into account.

I'm sure you are one of these people who claim personal statements are pointless and that the admissions tutors never read them, of which you would also be wrong.
Don't put words into my mouth. Both Oxford and Cambridge consider it part of the admission process so it is important, but the PS per se is not a deciding factor.

And I know this due to the fact that I have enquired to Oxford about it. They mentioned that: it “is an important component of your application” and “it will be read carefully by the admissions tutor in the college to which you apply or are allocated to”. They also mention that “it is just one of many factors we consider”.

Why the hell would I not agree with Oxford.

I believe the PS is important. Don't make false assumptions about me.

And if you haven't worked it out yet, if the admissions tutors are trying to decide between two candidates, and one has a good reference saying they turn up regularly and are willing to work, versus someone who doesn't regularly turn up and doesn't seem willing to put any effort in, who do you think they are going to pick?
Cambridge: "Admissions tutors take a 'holistic' approach".

They would not base an offer based on one single thing. Cambridge says so.

Are you disagreeing with Cambridge?

And for the record, I could easily change that situation around to be in favour of the second applicant:

Applicant 1: "turns up regularly" - does that show enthusiasm for the subject at degree level? Where's the passion for Medicine or Maths?
"willing to work" - for the A-level curriculum. But for their own interests? They might be willing to work, but not curious about the extended curriculum shown through extra reading etc.

Applicant 2: "doesn't turn up regularly" - maybe they have a genuine reason why not to? They prefer to self-study and learn through independent study - a value Oxbridge admires?
"doesn't seem to willing to put any effort in" - for the A-level curriculum. Again, they must have had to - otherwise they would not have achieved the grades for Cambridge. Also, they might not put any effort into lessons in A-level Maths or Biology as it is uninspiring, but outside of school they put in so much work through extra reading and attending lectures.

You're portraying applicant one to be better than applicant two, here I am portraying application two to be better than applicant one. So if you think I'm going to say applicant one - based on a a pathetic, meaningless reason, then no.

In fact, I would argue to the point that they do not care about extras like "turning up to lesson" and punctuality. How the hell does that relate with a person's enthusiasm for their "chosen subject at degree level".

Again, they would take a holistic approach and look into other factors, so it is IMPOSSIBLE to say whether applicant one will get into over applicant two and visa versa.

If applicant one does get in, it will be due to other factors as applications are looked at "holistically". Why the hell would Oxbridge disregard practically every part of the application and base it on "attendance"?

If applicant two does get in, it will be due to other factors as applications are looked at "holistically". He or she may have demonstrated enthusiasm etc that applicant one did not demonstrate in the interview for example, or applicant two succeeded well in the admissions test, but applicant one didn't.

Also, who is to say they look at the attendance in the school reference? Cambridge repeatedly emphasises "academic potential" for the subject at "degree level" - not for A-level. (Check yourself). In other words, an applicant may have poor effort for the subject at A-level, but who is to say they don't have amazing potential for the subject at degree level? This is aware through the interview, the applicant's personal statement, written work and admission tests.

It's also an unfair disadvantage on other applicants. How the hell can they take attendance into account when many schools don't say it? One applicant could have poor attendance, but all the other applicants at the same college they applied for had no mention of attendance - is it fair to discriminate against the pupil with poor attendance when you don't know about the other applicant's attendance record?

I could keep going forever at how wrong you are. I've backed up my points with evidence from Oxford and Cambridge.

You are making false claims without backing your opinion.

If you give me a validated source where they take into account attendance, I'll be willing to rethink my opinion. But honestly?

From evidence from Oxford and Cambridge, I conclude they do not care about your attendance to the point where they do not consider it a factor.

I hope Oxford and Cambridge will have replied back to me when you reply to this post where they address attendance specifically - to give you more evidence that they just do not care.
reply
yellowmeringue
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#18
Thanks everyone I'm not really a skiver, I occasionally skip days when I have P.E. and doss subjects to stay at home and study. Really appreciate your input!
0
reply
username202682
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#19
Report 8 years ago
#19
(Original post by yellowmeringue)
This is going to seem like a really stupid question.

Does Oxbridge care about school attendance? I have always been very good, but it's slipped to about 90% this year.

Is attendance something I will have to be careful about in the Sixth Form? Thanks
Unlikely, unless this is flagged up somehow although unlikely by the reference statement
reply
Rubgish
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#20
Report 8 years ago
#20
(Original post by im so academic)
Yeah they might it into consideration, but honestly, they do not give a damn. In fact, I will email Cambridge and Oxford to prove they don't give a **** about attendance.



********.

That would mean they are practically "conning" pupils. Why would they take something into consideration and not say it? That means many gifted A-level students could be at a disadvantage because they did not know attendance was taken into consideration.



http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/news/pres...dmissions.html

"They offer places to the ones they believe have the most academic potential and are best suited to the course in question."

Not if they have the best attendance.

They are looking for: "Academic potential and aptitude for studying the chosen subject at degree level..."; "Enthusiasm for and commitment to the chosen course..."; "Motivation and self-discipline..."

Good attendance is not a sign of motivation and self-discipline. OK, maybe a sign of motivation and self-discipline to go to school, but for their "chosen subject at degree level"? Not necessarily.

I'm backing up my statements using evidence from the Cambridge website (they go into more detail than Oxford). Then you state anything you deem logical from your brain.



"Admissions tutors take a 'holistic' approach, taking into account all the available information about an applicant".

They would not reject an applicant based on that only.

Also, how the hell can Oxbridge trust the school reference? It's a bit like the personal statement. The personal statement can easily include lies from the applicant and be plagarised; who's to say that the school reference is the gospel truth about the applicant?

In addition, the referee could be biased against the applicant, which would prove an unfair disadvantage against the applicant and I presume Oxbridge would know not. The school reference is not gospel truth.

In fact, using your example, "has potential... don't use it". Maybe they don't use it in class because they think the A-level curriculum is uninspiring, but who is to say that they don't use their potential outside of school through extra reading and relevant extra-curriculars which the referee is unaware of?

"never turns up to lessons" - well, if you don't turn up to lesson, how would the candidate get excellent grades at AS. Let's be honest, good grades at AS is practically a necessity as Cambridge do take that into account. So that's ********. There's also the possibility that the quality of teaching is poor at their school, so they might as well self-teach at home and therefore they do not "turn up to lessons". Don't be so cynical.

"don't put effort in". Again - they might not put as much effort into their work as they find the A-level curriculum. In fact, I would argue that that statement is not a true statement. Again - chances are this applicant has to have good grades at AS to be even considered, so they must have put some sort of effort into their work to get the grades needed to apply for Cambridge. So that's ********.

Can you see why Oxbridge does not take the school reference as gospel truth? It's an indication of what the student is like, but Oxbridge will make their minds up through the interviews.



Who is to say they don't use it?

IN FACT, they might not even have had the opportunity to have used their potential, so if anything, it could even be a positive thing as the admission tutors will see that their potential has gone unnoticed and perhaps benefit from an Oxbridge degree.



Define a "bad statement". One that insults the pupils? One that does not mention a single positive quality about the applicant?

In addition, you're twisting your words: there's a big different to taking attendance account, in comparision to taking the school reference into account.



Don't put words into my mouth. Both Oxford and Cambridge consider it part of the admission process so it is important, but the PS per se is not a deciding factor.

And I know this due to the fact that I have enquired to Oxford about it. They mentioned that: it “is an important component of your application” and “it will be read carefully by the admissions tutor in the college to which you apply or are allocated to”. They also mention that “it is just one of many factors we consider”.

Why the hell would I not agree with Oxford.

I believe the PS is important. Don't make false assumptions about me.



Cambridge: "Admissions tutors take a 'holistic' approach".

They would not base an offer based on one single thing. Cambridge says so.

Are you disagreeing with Cambridge?

And for the record, I could easily change that situation around to be in favour of the second applicant:

Applicant 1: "turns up regularly" - does that show enthusiasm for the subject at degree level? Where's the passion for Medicine or Maths?
"willing to work" - for the A-level curriculum. But for their own interests? They might be willing to work, but not curious about the extended curriculum shown through extra reading etc.

Applicant 2: "doesn't turn up regularly" - maybe they have a genuine reason why not to? They prefer to self-study and learn through independent study - a value Oxbridge admires?
"doesn't seem to willing to put any effort in" - for the A-level curriculum. Again, they must have had to - otherwise they would not have achieved the grades for Cambridge. Also, they might not put any effort into lessons in A-level Maths or Biology as it is uninspiring, but outside of school they put in so much work through extra reading and attending lectures.

You're portraying applicant one to be better than applicant two, here I am portraying application two to be better than applicant one. So if you think I'm going to say applicant one - based on a a pathetic, meaningless reason, then no.

In fact, I would argue to the point that they do not care about extras like "turning up to lesson" and punctuality. How the hell does that relate with a person's enthusiasm for their "chosen subject at degree level".

Again, they would take a holistic approach and look into other factors, so it is IMPOSSIBLE to say whether applicant one will get into over applicant two and visa versa.

If applicant one does get in, it will be due to other factors as applications are looked at "holistically". Why the hell would Oxbridge disregard practically every part of the application and base it on "attendance"?

If applicant two does get in, it will be due to other factors as applications are looked at "holistically". He or she may have demonstrated enthusiasm etc that applicant one did not demonstrate in the interview for example, or applicant two succeeded well in the admissions test, but applicant one didn't.

Also, who is to say they look at the attendance in the school reference? Cambridge repeatedly emphasises "academic potential" for the subject at "degree level" - not for A-level. (Check yourself). In other words, an applicant may have poor effort for the subject at A-level, but who is to say they don't have amazing potential for the subject at degree level? This is aware through the interview, the applicant's personal statement, written work and admission tests.

It's also an unfair disadvantage on other applicants. How the hell can they take attendance into account when many schools don't say it? One applicant could have poor attendance, but all the other applicants at the same college they applied for had no mention of attendance - is it fair to discriminate against the pupil with poor attendance when you don't know about the other applicant's attendance record?

I could keep going forever at how wrong you are. I've backed up my points with evidence from Oxford and Cambridge.

You are making false claims without backing your opinion.

If you give me a validated source where they take into account attendance, I'll be willing to rethink my opinion. But honestly?

From evidence from Oxford and Cambridge, I conclude they do not care about your attendance to the point where they do not consider it a factor.

I hope Oxford and Cambridge will have replied back to me when you reply to this post where they address attendance specifically - to give you more evidence that they just do not care.
TL;DR.

kthxbai.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Solent University
    Careers in maritime Undergraduate
    Sat, 2 Feb '19
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    City and Collegiate Campus Undergraduate
    Sun, 3 Feb '19

Do you have a role model?

Yes - I know them personally (301)
26.06%
Yes - they're famous (293)
25.37%
No I don't (561)
48.57%

Watched Threads

View All