What is a mickey mouse course? Watch

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JJassonn
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#61
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#61
I'm wondering which subjects aren't as well recieved as experience and past accomplishments. Taking a computer games course for example... would employers want to see one of these, or would they rather see a good mod of a game, or total conversion on an existing game engine, or something totally new, from scratch?

If this is the case then I suppose you could argue that the course is not needed. However, having said this, I dare say with this ccourse it would be far easier to give the employers in this field something they want (mod, TC, etc etc).

I'm just thinking that for a lot of subjects based around this theory, I think the students have to be prepared to be out of work (in the field they want to be in) for a year or two while they get some experience.
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Immy
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#62
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#62
I wouldn't like to think any course is micky mouse...A degree is a degree at the end of the day, however, I would say that the majority of employers would prefer something like Maths or Physics to Sociology or Media Studies....
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Gaz031
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#63
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A degree is a degree at the end of the day
I couldn't disagree more with that.
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Immy
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#64
(Original post by Gaz031)
I couldn't disagree more with that.
Why?
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Gaz031
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#65
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#65
(Original post by Immy)
Why?
Do you think http://www.sihe.ac.uk/sihe/slts/basrm.htm and http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/ are equivelant, since 'a degree is a degree'.
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Immy
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(Original post by Gaz031)
Do you think http://www.sihe.ac.uk/sihe/slts/basrm.htm and http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/ are equivelant, since 'a degree is a degree'.
Well no... but the vast majority are...... disregarding things like Surf Studies.... if you are in talking about in terms of reputability then ok... I follow your point.
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ChemistBoy
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#67
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My concern is not the 'mickey mouseness' of these degrees but the vast over specialisation. People are more deserting tradtional, broader degree programme to take part in these highly specialised programmes and many of the increased number of those entering higher education are choosing these programmes. The universities are just making a buck out of this and they don't really care about the employment prospects of individuals who graduate with these degrees, which outside their specific areas are at a definite disadvantage to more broader degree holding graduates (for instance what if there are no jobs in turfgrass? Are you going to be able to compete with other horticulture graduates for jobs in the flower industry when you have no specific learning in that area?)
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Comp_Genius
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(Original post by Gaz031)
Do you think http://www.sihe.ac.uk/sihe/slts/basrm.htm and http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/ are equivelant, since 'a degree is a degree'.
a degree is a degree? isn't that the precise definition of a degree? It's like saying a table is a table. :rolleyes: :cool: :p:
it's the quality of the degree that matters. :rofl:
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Immy
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(Original post by darkenergy)
a degree is a degree? isn't that the precise definition of a degree? It's like saying a table is a table. :rolleyes: :cool: :p:
it's the quality of the degree that matters. :rofl:
Perzackley!!
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Comp_Genius
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(Original post by Immy)
Perzackley!!
is it me, i have never seen this word before? :confused:
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Gaz031
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#71
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(Original post by darkenergy)
a degree is a degree? isn't that the precise definition of a degree? It's like saying a table is a table. :rolleyes: :cool: :p:
it's the quality of the degree that matters. :rofl:
Well as you're being pedantic stating 'a degree is a degree' isn't a definition - it's just a restatement of something you already know!
Of course, you knew what we both meant.
Debating on this subject is a battleground between political correctness and academic snobbery - it's hard to find some middle ground that everyone agrees with.
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Immy
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#72
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(Original post by darkenergy)
is it me, i have never seen this word before? :confused:
Another word for exactly
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Comp_Genius
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#73
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(Original post by Gaz031)
Well as you're being pedantic
oh trust me, mathematicans are more pedantic than us mere mortals.
(Original post by Gaz031)
stating 'a degree is a degree' isn't a definition - it's just a restatement of something you already know!
who's being more pedantic now? :biggrin:
(Original post by Gaz031)
Of course, you knew what we both meant.
i know.
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Comp_Genius
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#74
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(Original post by Immy)
Another word for exactly
Oh right. couldn't find it in the dictionary. :rolleyes:
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Gaz031
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#75
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oh trust me, mathematicans are more pedantic than us mere mortals.
I wouldn't honour myself with a title so prestigous as "mathematician" just yet!
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legendkillerpr
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#76
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#76
i do computer games technology at John Moores and i wouldnt call it a mickey mouse course. A lot of what we do is setting us up for a career in the computing industry where there is a lot of demand for jobs at the moment. We have a placement year aswell to give us some experience.

paul
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kellywood_5
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#77
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You should go to university for academic study, not vocational training. I have no problem at all with subjects like media studies, film studies, sociology and psychology because although some people dismiss them as 'mickey mouse' they're still academic subjects. However, things like golf course management, wine tasting and surf studies just take things too far. If you want a career in one of those areas, get a job and learn while you're doing it, rather than wasting 3 years of your life and a lot of money getting a useless degree that no-one will respect.
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AT82
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#78
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(Original post by kellywood_5)
You should go to university for academic study, not vocational training. I have no problem at all with subjects like media studies, film studies, sociology and psychology because although some people dismiss them as 'mickey mouse' they're still academic subjects. However, things like golf course management, wine tasting and surf studies just take things too far. If you want a career in one of those areas, get a job and learn while you're doing it, rather than wasting 3 years of your life and a lot of money getting a useless degree that no-one will respect.
So should they teach Dentistery or Medicine at colleges then? Computer Games is a classic example without a degree you will get no where, and plenty of people get jobs who have done computer games degrees.

The truth is local colleges would have no idea where to begin in teaching a subject like that.

Many courses have to teach vocational things, if a computing course didn't teach programming becuase it was vocational there would be a lot of useless graduates out there. I have no idrea how to write in C++ but I can tell you how to write in ZX80 assembler. Its not what employers want.
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Sarky
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#79
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#79
Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing and Engineering are all vocational degrees. They are all studied in universities.
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AT82
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#80
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#80
(Original post by Sarky)
Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing and Engineering are all vocational degrees. They are all studied in universities.
Exactly thats my point, my university teaches Aircraft engineering where students have to fix planes. To be able to this students have to understand exactly how aircraft work, there is an awful lot of maths involved. I just wish people would think more before stating a course as mickey mouse if they don't know anything about it.

Vocational subjects have a lot of academic content as well, I just wish people would realise that.

Having said this I am not saying all degrees are equal, some are easier than others. Its only really the UK that this vocational snobbery really exists as well.

(Original post by JJassonn)
I'm wondering which subjects aren't as well recieved as experience and past accomplishments. Taking a computer games course for example... would employers want to see one of these, or would they rather see a good mod of a game, or total conversion on an existing game engine, or something totally new, from scratch?

If this is the case then I suppose you could argue that the course is not needed. However, having said this, I dare say with this ccourse it would be far easier to give the employers in this field something they want (mod, TC, etc etc).

I'm just thinking that for a lot of subjects based around this theory, I think the students have to be prepared to be out of work (in the field they want to be in) for a year or two while they get some experience.
And how is one suppose to learn how to make computer games? There is an awful lot of physics involved, and quite a lot of complex maths such as vectors.

I would imagine the final year project would require the student to make an original computer game to a high standard, so they can show an employer a real life example as well as having a degree. The fact is if you teach youself you can get into so much bad habbits.

Since going to university my programming style has changed a lot, and I no longer do any of the bad habbits I once did. I did have a college education before university as well.
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