What is a mickey mouse course? Watch

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shady lane
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#101
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#101
The point is, many of these subjects (e.g. Adventure Tourism) didn't used to need university degrees. You got hired by a tourism company or hotel, and you got training within about a month. These degrees are a mix of random topics, attempting to create some cohesion. Surf Sciences at Plymouth has physiology, marine science, craft (building surfboards), and "residential field trips," I'm guessing to Hawaii or something. Is that really what a university degree is about? Any graduate with any degree can apply for the same jobs that many of these "mickey mouse" courses teach people about for three years.
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nikk
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#102
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(Original post by ancientone)
My point is that I can't comment really on what is a mickey mouse degree because I don't know the content of the course, standards, employability, final destinations of graduates or any other indicators. Without that knowledge I'm not going to condemn a degree course, or fellow students on it, as mickey mouse. I don't have enough knowledge - all I have is a name. That's not enough to make a valid assesssment of a course.
I agree...that is why I haven't actually aired my own opinion in this thread, I have just tried to keep to stating various sides of the argument and different points of view.

Admittedly, I strayed from this with the David Becham Studies comment, but as I said, I am fairly convinced on that one!
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nikk
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#103
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(Original post by PQ)
umm - if you look into it I think you'll find that "David Beckham studies" has never been offered as a taught undergraduate degree - IIRC it was a dissertation topic/PhD topic (self funded). :rolleyes:
I am glad to hear that!
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ancientone
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#104
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#104
The arguments being put forward here by many people are purely about the title of the course rather than the content. Personally I think the content of a course is more important than the title.
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Holleh
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#105
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#105
the ucas directory is quite interesting to look through, theres even a degree in basket weaving, which i would consider a micky mouse degree personally. Im not saying that this does not requre a lot of skill, but surely it will be cheaper to learn to do this job as an apprenticeship? It just seems a waste of the students money when they could learn on the job. I was told my degree was a micky mouse one the other day which rather upset me, im doing biomedical science
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Holleh
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#106
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#106
oh im not saying it isnt a highly skilled job, but it just seems to be alot of money to pay to learn it. For example i know alot of people who are doing art degrees which are nearly all practical, to me that seems a bit pointless, you dont need a degree to say you are a good artist, unless of course you want to study art history etc or want to be an art teacher, but none of these people do. I just cant get my head around it lol.
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Nicki P
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#107
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#107
i think the general concensus is that Art courses, drama courses and music courses are "mickey mouse courses"
no to say thats my opinion because i admire anyone who can draw, act and play an instrument!!
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ChemistBoy
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#108
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#108
I guess it's really to do with the subjects that have active and sizeable research in that area. Subjects like Media Studies do have considerable research into that area, however subjects like adventure tourism or surf science are somewhat questionable in that area.
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Holleh
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#109
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i play saxophone, i think people that can play an instrument (better then me lol), act, dance etc are very talented, i dont think they need a degree to prove that they are talented.
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Comp_Genius
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#110
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#110
there are diplomas available for instruments anyway.
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ChemistBoy
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#111
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#111
There are music, arts and drama colleges that specialise in that thing anyway - it seems appropriate to study those vocational subjects in that sort of enivronment so why not other vocation subjects?
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ancientone
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#112
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#112
MusB and equivalent BAs are some of the oldest degrees and offered by many of the most prestigious universities in the world. Institutions such as The Royal Northern College of Music, a university institution, has an international reputation.
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ChemistBoy
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#113
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#113
(Original post by PQ)
there's a bit more to a degree in music than playing a few tunes well
But not to study for performance. If one wants to study as a performer, university is certainly not the place to do it in the UK.
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ChemistBoy
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#114
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#114
(Original post by ancientone)
MusB and equivalent BAs are some of the oldest degrees and offered by many of the most prestigious universities in the world. Institutions such as The Royal Northern College of Music, a university institution, has an international reputation.
The northern, scottish and the college are accredited to give degrees however they specialise in the performing arts, isn't it appropriate that other vocational subjects be taught by such institutions?
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ancientone
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#115
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
The northern, scottish and the college are accredited to give degrees however they specialise in the performing arts, isn't it appropriate that other vocational subjects be taught by such institutions?
That's exactly the point they give degrees and are university institutions-so it's just the same for many of the other subjects-degrees awarded by university instiututions. Yet for some reason people seek to denigrate these courses-and by implication the people doing them. I find that sad.
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Comp_Genius
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#116
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#116
(Original post by PQ)
there's a bit more to a degree in music than playing a few tunes well
:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
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ChemistBoy
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#117
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#117
(Original post by ancientone)
That's exactly the point they give degrees and are university institutions-so it's just the same for many of the other subjects-degrees awarded by university instiututions. Yet for some reason people seek to denigrate these courses-and by implication the people doing them. I find that sad.
I really think institutions like the RNCM are beyond reproach, a GRNCM is incredibly difficult to achieve however, it is a vocational degree. Your professors are performance musicians not academics. The RNCM is not the same as the standard university. My point is that such institutions should exist for other vocational subjects so they can be studied in a similar manner.
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musicbloke
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#118
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#118
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
There are music, arts and drama colleges that specialise in that thing anyway - it seems appropriate to study those vocational subjects in that sort of enivronment so why not other vocation subjects?
Maybe you should go and do some research. I, for example, study music at an extremely prestigious university, on an extremely prestigious course. I don't play an instrument anymore and my main interest lies in historical musicology of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well as the history of ideas attached to that. I could not get this education at a music college (where the focus is on becoming a player/composer). My education is more holistic and interesting, not to mention it being just as tough as any other academic subject in Cambridge. There is no provision for those of us who want to approach music academically at music college hence why we can study it as a degree. It is more than playing a few tunes, it is getting a broad education at the highest level possible, openning up oportunities for useful historical and aesthetic research, and allowing students to grasp the realities of cultural values.

MB
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HistoryStudent
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#119
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(Original post by Holleh)
oh im not saying it isnt a highly skilled job, but it just seems to be alot of money to pay to learn it. For example i know alot of people who are doing art degrees which are nearly all practical, to me that seems a bit pointless, you dont need a degree to say you are a good artist, unless of course you want to study art history etc or want to be an art teacher, but none of these people do. I just cant get my head around it lol.
The vast majority of artists, especially famous ones, have had some training at art school or university - sure you can be very talented without training, but to reach the highest level you have to know all the available techniques. You also have to be able to evaluate your own artwork and other people's through extensive studies and also essays. It is extremely rare to find a professional artist with no training.
In my eyes the situation is a bit like sport. You can be a very talented athlete, but without all the correct training techniques etc you will not rise to the highest level - the same can be said about art. Even if you do not want to be a professional artist, trainling is very useful!
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ChemistBoy
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#120
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(Original post by musicbloke)
Maybe you should go and do some research. I, for example, study music at an extremely prestigious university, on an extremely prestigious course. I don't play an instrument anymore and my main interest lies in historical musicology of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well as the history of ideas attached to that. I could not get this education at a music college (where the focus is on becoming a player/composer). My education is more holistic and interesting, not to mention it being just as tough as any other academic subject in Cambridge. There is no provision for those of us who want to approach music academically at music college hence why we can study it as a degree. It is more than playing a few tunes, it is getting a broad education at the highest level possible, openning up oportunities for useful historical and aesthetic research, and allowing students to grasp the realities of cultural values.

MB
Maybe you should learn to read. I have clearly stated that I was talking about performance. I am well aware of the academic study of music.
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