What is a mickey mouse course? Watch

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ancientone
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#121
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Chemistboy -several years ago there were a host of different Higher Education colleges that specialised in particular areas-Colleges of Music, Art Colleges, Colleges of Education, Agricultural Colleges, to name but a few. First of all the standards produced in these colleges was decidedly patchy and it was also massively expensive to maintain hundreds of separate colleges, each with their own site and administration. It's simply cheaper and a better standard of education through Universities rather than specialist colleges.
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Planxty
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#122
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(Original post by ancientone)
That's exactly the point they give degrees and are university institutions-so it's just the same for many of the other subjects-degrees awarded by university instiututions. Yet for some reason people seek to denigrate these courses-and by implication the people doing them. I find that sad.
Totally agree. I find there to be so many people on this board that are obsessed with 'Oxbridge' and 'red brick uni's' and are just sort of snobby in general. Obsessed with studying, and exam results and career prospects.

Like most people on this board are in the late teen bracket, and a lot of them yet so obsessed with academics and academic institutions (i know thats the theme of the board, but i hope u get my point).

There is such snobbery on this board its incredible. I think anyone who can call ANY course a 'micky mouse course' is a stuck up tosser.

Someone mentioned they were doing Film & Documentary Production studies or something on those lines. There are people here who would have the cheek to try and demeen that persons course, just because they are not following the 'traditional' maths/english/science etc at a red brick uni.

I think if a subject like that, or stained glass production or anything like these INTERESTS a person, and there is an education available for them in the area, then more power to them! Go and try maximise your knowledge and skill in the area.

These 'Oxbridge' fanatic academics (dont mean to generalise) and anyone like them i'm sure have watched a documentary or tv program at some stage in their life. Would they have the slightlest idea how to create one?? Would a medical graduate from oxbridge know the most basic fundamentals of this sort of production???

I'd guess not. Yet many would watch it, enjoy it, but when they hear of somebody wanting to get into this area to work and study and be creative, motivated and dedicated to this career path, they have the nerve to try and somehow mock the person's academic choice???

Apologies if Im rambling.. I hope some people can understand what im saying here and hopefully agree.

Yet for some on this board, Im afraid their heads are too far up their ass studying a textbook while occasionally stopping to mock someones educational choices in a vain attempt to try and convince themselves they are in someway superior to their piers.
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ChemistBoy
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#123
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(Original post by PQ)
chemistboy - do you really want to farm all vocational study out to specialist colleges? That sounds like HELL, a university full of academic students isn't that fun a place - uni should be all about different subjects, disciplines, researchers rubbing up against each other, developing new interdisciplinary areas and inspiring each other to get a more interesting and free thinking environment - if everyone gets plopped in their little pigeon holes it will stifle the entire envirnoment of a university, from a students perspective and a research perspective.

A bit of friction and diversity makes life (and research) so much more interesting.
There is plenty of diversity as it is within academic studies (political science and chemistry are poles apart for instance). I am more concerned with students receiving the best out of their education and being at an appropriate institution is part of that. Universities are currently trying to design business strategies for a range of subjects that are both research and non-research based - this leads a) to conflicts b) to compromised situations where neither area is satisfied.
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an Siarach
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#124
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(Original post by Riddy)
I don't get it cause different people find different subjects hard. Some are good at a certain subject while others won't be.
On the other hand some courses are simply easier depending on where you do them regardless of whether or not the subject is respected.
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ChemistBoy
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#125
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(Original post by ancientone)
Chemistboy -several years ago there were a host of different Higher Education colleges that specialised in particular areas-Colleges of Music, Art Colleges, Colleges of Education, Agricultural Colleges, to name but a few. First of all the standards produced in these colleges was decidedly patchy and it was also massively expensive to maintain hundreds of separate colleges, each with their own site and administration. It's simply cheaper and a better standard of education through Universities rather than specialist colleges.
Many of these specialist colleges have become universities though. The best working practice seems to be for universities to seperate such things as agriculture, nursing, etc. onto specialised campuses - which is essentially the same thing.
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shady lane
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#126
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An increased number of "modern" bachelor's degrees does reflect on everyone who has a university degree. If I went to uni to study law, I would be really mad if come graduation there were students getting a degree in Adventure Tourism from the same institution. It makes the bachelor's degree seem less distinguished.

In the US there are so many random degrees floating around that now if you don't go to one of the top schools (and even if you do) it's getting really hard to get a job without a graduate degree. I don't think you lot would want that in the UK also.
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ChemistBoy
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#127
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(Original post by shady lane)
An increased number of "modern" bachelor's degrees does reflect on everyone who has a university degree. If I went to uni to study law, I would be really mad if come graduation there were students getting a degree in Adventure Tourism from the same institution. It makes the bachelor's degree seem less distinguished.

In the US there are so many random degrees floating around that now if you don't go to one of the top schools (and even if you do) it's getting really hard to get a job without a graduate degree. I don't think you lot would want that in the UK also.
I'm afraid that looks like the way we are heading. Coporate Universities will be the next thing...

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ancientone
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#128
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Many of these specialist colleges have become universities though. The best working practice seems to be for universities to seperate such things as agriculture, nursing, etc. onto specialised campuses - which is essentially the same thing.
But they're now part of a University and that has a significant impact on the way they operate, their ability to attract highy qualified staff for example. The most highly qualified staff in most colleges in the 70s were holders of Masters degreees, some had bachelors and many weren't even graduates. There was a serious lack of academic rigour in the courses and facilities were appalling since most of the budgets went on site maintenance-with the inclusion of these colleges in Unis there have been major savings on plant that have been ploughed back into staff and courses, staff are more highly qualified and academic rigour is higher. The student wins on all counts. The vast majority of these colleges have actually closed and the grounds aren't used for anything related to education, although there are still a few campuses off site that are used but they are far fewer than there were-eg there were over 150 Colleges of Education in the 1970s-there aren't that many separate sites now.
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ChemistBoy
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#129
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(Original post by ancientone)
But they're now part of a University and that has a significant impact on the way they operate, their ability to attract highy qualified staff for example. The most highly qualified staff in most colleges in the 70s were holders of Masters degreees, some had bachelors and many weren't even graduates. There was a serious lack of academic rigour in the courses and facilities were appalling since most of the budgets went on site maintenance-with the inclusion of these colleges in Unis there have been major savings on plant that have been ploughed back into staff and courses, staff are more highly qualified and academic rigour is higher.
I don't think so. I know several lecturers at Universities without high level academic qualifications - it's the same old faces just a different employer. There is no really increase in academic rigour at all. All that has happened is that there is now a divide between "good" and "bad" universities and people are embroiled in a debate about what a degree is and what its worth is.
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ancientone
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
I don't think so. I know several lecturers at Universities without high level academic qualifications - it's the same old faces just a different employer. There is no really increase in academic rigour at all. All that has happened is that there is now a divide between "good" and "bad" universities and people are embroiled in a debate about what a degree is and what its worth is.
Some of this is true, and there were the same arguments about standards then as there are now. There has been a vast improvement in the qualifications of staff though, that's a fact. When I went to a College of Education in the 1970s there was one lecturer who got his PhD during my time there and he was the exception. When I left I was more highly qualiied with my Bachelor's degree than many of the staff. However the fact remains that were we to reopen all the separate colleges to provide the system you advocate then the costs would be huge and past experience would indicate that there would be no commensurate increase in academic rigour.
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MadLove
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#131
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OMG!! How dare you people decide on what people "should" and "shouldn't" study. To be quite honest...its none of your business if someone wants to study Sports Science etc!

I personally can't wait to study Performing Arts at A UNIVERSITY (ARKGH!!!!) and cannot wait to hone my skills and broaden my knowledge on this amazing subject! I'd MUCH rather study an interesting arts-subject than have my head stuck in a stuffy algebra (how useless) book...and please remember, only boring people study maths and science et al! MWAHAHAHA!


xxxx
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RxB
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(Original post by Planxty)
These 'Oxbridge' fanatic academics (dont mean to generalise) and anyone like them i'm sure have watched a documentary or tv program at some stage in their life. Would they have the slightlest idea how to create one?? Would a medical graduate from oxbridge know the most basic fundamentals of this sort of production???
One of my teachers at school used to be the head of history programming at the BBC, before starting a freelance company. He directed and produced. He did History at Oxford.

Whaddayaknow...
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CasterTroy
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#133
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You can do degrees in text messaging and reality TV shows these days. Not like in my day.
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Naxalite
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#134
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(Original post by MadLove)
OMG!! How dare you people decide on what people "should" and "shouldn't" study. To be quite honest...its none of your business if someone wants to study Sports Science etc!

I personally can't wait to study Performing Arts at A UNIVERSITY (ARKGH!!!!) and cannot wait to hone my skills and broaden my knowledge on this amazing subject! I'd MUCH rather study an interesting arts-subject than have my head stuck in a stuffy algebra (how useless) book...and please remember, only boring people study maths and science et al! MWAHAHAHA!


xxxx
I will be sure to look out for you at the strip club, performance art at its finest.
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MadLove
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#135
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Strip club?

My bedroom is my stage!
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boyla
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#136
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#136
You didn't always know what you know now, why argue with people because of what they dont know, instead teach them.
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boyla
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#137
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#137
With regards to vocational courses, you can only learn so much from a book
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sam1980
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#138
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#138
(Original post by MadLove)
OMG!! How dare you people decide on what people "should" and "shouldn't" study. To be quite honest...its none of your business if someone wants to study Sports Science etc!
as a tax payer, it is very much my business and the business of every other tax payer.
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MadLove
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Taxes? Taxes don't pay for University...

Hence us paying tuition fees, accommodation fees etc!

It's upto the individual what they want to study, not you!
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Comp_Genius
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#140
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why aren't we allowed to express our opinions? It is not as if we can shut down these mickey mouse courses.
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