Any good book ideas? Watch

jharrington93
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
Recently I've been wanting to read more. I want to improve my language skills and have something to kill some time, with the summer coming up.

I lost my interest in reading fiction during GCSE English after being forced to read and discuss stories that I couldn't connect with (like The Crucible by Arthur Miller). Since then I've not read anything, and this shortage of has left me with not brilliant literacy skills and a lot of free time.

What I'm looking for is an author or series talking about teenage life thats based on mature teens. I'm a 17 year old dude if that helps at all. Any suggestions are appreciated and I'll look foreward to reading some of them.

Thanks,
James
0
reply
snowshine
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
(Original post by jharrington93)
Recently I've been wanting to read more. I want to improve my language skills and have something to kill some time, with the summer coming up.

I lost my interest in reading fiction during GCSE English after being forced to read and discuss stories that I couldn't connect with (like The Crucible by Arthur Miller). Since then I've not read anything, and this shortage of has left me with not brilliant literacy skills and a lot of free time.

What I'm looking for is an author or series talking about teenage life thats based on mature teens. I'm a 17 year old dude if that helps at all. Any suggestions are appreciated and I'll look foreward to reading some of them.

Thanks,
James
The Reader is good.
Atonement is good as well.
0
reply
heidigirl
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report 8 years ago
#3
Have you ever read 'Falling into Glory' by Robert Westall? It's about a 17 year old who has a relationship with one of his teachers. It is a truly excellent book for 'young adult' fiction.

Would also recommend 'Postcards from No-Man's Land' and 'The Toll Bridge' by Aidan Chambers.

And 'The Cider House Rules' by John Irving maybe?
0
reply
ilovepolska
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
anything by Paulo Coelho, EXCEPT 'brida' which i found really dull
'a child called it' and the books that follow it are quite inspirational
oh and 'the children of belsen' is quite good too!
0
reply
jharrington93
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#5
Thanks, I'll have a look into these.
0
reply
kosher
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#6
Report 8 years ago
#6
Catcher in the Rye, i've never read it, but it is meant to been very popular amongst us teens. The Crow Road is a coming of age kind of story
0
reply
MJlover
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 8 years ago
#7
Well I know this isn't a 'teenage book' but I sincerely love it, it really is a fascinating/fantastic book. This is coming from someone who can't read a novel for more than 3 pages without giving up.
its called ' Brave New World' by Aldous Huxley.
0
reply
lovely_me
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#8
Report 8 years ago
#8
The Very Hungry Caterpillar is an excellent novella for the early readers category. A 21st century triumph.
0
reply
qasman
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#9
Report 8 years ago
#9
noughts and crosses !!

da vinci code, angels and demons, the lost symbol...
0
reply
paniking_and_not_revising
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 8 years ago
#10
(Original post by jharrington93)
Recently I've been wanting to read more. I want to improve my language skills and have something to kill some time, with the summer coming up.

I lost my interest in reading fiction during GCSE English after being forced to read and discuss stories that I couldn't connect with (like The Crucible by Arthur Miller). Since then I've not read anything, and this shortage of has left me with not brilliant literacy skills and a lot of free time.

What I'm looking for is an author or series talking about teenage life thats based on mature teens. I'm a 17 year old dude if that helps at all. Any suggestions are appreciated and I'll look foreward to reading some of them.

Thanks,
James
http://www.amazon.com/dp/0439324599

Cut by Patricia mccormick

http://www.amazon.com/Impulse-Ellen-...ref=pd_sim_b_4

I've not read this but the reviews are pretty good. I might pick it up some day.


EDIT
I've heard a lot of good stuff about the Hunger Games
0
reply
missygeorgia
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#11
Report 8 years ago
#11
The 'Hard Cash' series by Kate Cann are really good, well written teen fiction for guys. I mean, they're not prestigious or classics, but you don't feel like you're reading something patronising or too young for you, which is the feeling a lot of teen fic gives. Kate Cann is pretty awesome.
0
reply
evantej
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#12
Report 8 years ago
#12
(Original post by jharrington93)
Recently I've been wanting to read more. I want to improve my language skills and have something to kill some time, with the summer coming up.

I lost my interest in reading fiction during GCSE English after being forced to read and discuss stories that I couldn't connect with (like The Crucible by Arthur Miller). Since then I've not read anything, and this shortage of has left me with not brilliant literacy skills and a lot of free time.

What I'm looking for is an author or series talking about teenage life thats based on mature teens. I'm a 17 year old dude if that helps at all. Any suggestions are appreciated and I'll look foreward to reading some of them.

Thanks,
James
Your problem (loss of interest in reading fiction) has nothing to do with literacy, but seems to me to be an issue of imagination. First of all, did you ever stop and think about why they might be teaching those texts at GCSE, or that not all literature is supposed to make a connection to its reader? In addition, the first book I read after finishing my English degree a few weeks ago was not something ridiculously hard or unwieldy, but C.S. Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia; I am reading The Silver Chair (1953) at the moment! If you think these texts are for children (characters in the story, language used etc., etc..) then why are there so many Christian, Hellenistic ('Greek'), and Romantic allusions which no child could possibly interpret? In summary, if you impose such strict restrictions on your reading then you will get nothing from literature to be honest; you may as well read newspapers instead if you want to improve your literacy. Nevertheless, I will suggest Charles Dickens' Great Expectations (1861).
0
reply
Johnblue
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 8 years ago
#13
I also lost my imagination after GCSE- I think TV had a hand in it
0
reply
fink
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 8 years ago
#14
the man in the high castle by Philip K. ****
0
reply
Johnblue
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report 8 years ago
#15
oh yeh and read napolean of notting hill it's one of my favourites
0
reply
jharrington93
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#16
(Original post by evantej)
Your problem (loss of interest in reading fiction) has nothing to do with literacy, but seems to me to be an issue of imagination. First of all, did you ever stop and think about why they might be teaching those texts at GCSE, or that not all literature is supposed to make a connection to its reader? In addition, the first book I read after finishing my English degree a few weeks ago was not something ridiculously hard or unwieldy, but C.S. Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia; I am reading The Silver Chair (1953) at the moment! If you think these texts are for children (characters in the story, language used etc., etc..) then why are there so many Christian, Hellenistic ('Greek'), and Romantic allusions which no child could possibly interpret? In summary, if you impose such strict restrictions on your reading then you will get nothing from literature to be honest; you may as well read newspapers instead if you want to improve your literacy. Nevertheless, I will suggest Charles Dickens' Great Expectations (1861).
I did think about the issues we were talking about while reading the Books, e.g. To kill a mockingbird was showing us that sometimes it's best to find stuff out for yourself than to be told by your elders. But I just felt like I should have chosen to read it, not forced to.
0
reply
evantej
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#17
Report 8 years ago
#17
(Original post by jharrington93)
I did think about the issues we were talking about while reading the Books, e.g. To kill a mockingbird was showing us that sometimes it's best to find stuff out for yourself than to be told by your elders. But I just felt like I should have chosen to read it, not forced to.
If you were not forced to read something then you probably would not read anything at all; most students do not have a natural interest in most subjects let alone English. I have had to read a lot of texts that I did not like, but I question why I do not like them and why I would be asked to read them. For example, when I did GCSEs the top set in English studied William Golding's Lord of the flies (1954) while the second set students studied John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men (1937), because it was seen as the easier of the two texts. Having reread both texts as a mentor last year, I think the reasoning behind this choice is terrible, but I can only say it is terrible because I was forced to read them! :p:
0
reply
Johnblue
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#18
Report 8 years ago
#18
20,000 leagues under the sea is good
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?

Remain (1111)
79.07%
Leave (294)
20.93%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed