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    Can anyone tell if a masters degree is need inoder to get into a PhD program, or can you go straight into the PhD from BSc?.
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    (Original post by HITMAN_No1)
    Can anyone tell if a masters degree is need inoder to get into a PhD program, or can you go straight into the PhD from BSc?.
    Im pretty sure you cannt do a PHD from a BSc, but im not sure what qualification you need in between, I think you need a MSc first.
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    Enquire at the department first- they would usually have some requirements. If you have the 4 year undergrad degree like MMaths or MPhys etc, you can join for Ph.D. Or else, you might need M.Sc or M.Phil or at least relevant research experience.
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    You can do a PhD straight from a BSc degree - to get accepted onto a PhD most universities with ask for a first or upper second (2:1) class BSc degree minimum. If you're not sure about commiting yourself to a PhD then you could do a year long research MSc first, or you could do an undergraduate masters degree such as an MChem, MPhys etc which include a big research project in your 4th year, which is supposedly geared towards students wanting to go into research or industry. Its all swings and roundabouts really - I have been studying chemistry and up until now was doing an MChem, but have reached the end of my 2nd year and realised the MChem isn't for me, so have dropped down to the BSc and am looking into taught MSc courses (there's no way i'm planning to do a PhD though) that are more specific to what I want to do. I guess best thing to do is talk to admissions tutors about your future plans, as they're the ones that know best!
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    Yup my friend got a 2:1 in BSc Biological Sciences and went straight onto his PhD It must be said that most people do study a Masters first however.
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    Some universities (like nottingham) only accept applicants with undergrad or postgrad masters. Look at the specific institution that you are interested in. I have to say that there is no harm in doing a undergraduate masters course.
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    I got told by a number of universities that 4 years of study is required before starting a PhD and this is usually achieved by doing a 4 year masters degree but you can also do one year on top of three after you graduate with a BSc.
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    (Original post by HITMAN_No1)
    Can anyone tell if a masters degree is need inoder to get into a PhD program, or can you go straight into the PhD from BSc?.

    On the whole, no. However, there are a few departments who stipulate a masters is a requirement (but this is usually a departmental thing, and I'm not aware of any UK Uni who has an across the board masters only policy)
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    (Original post by nikk)
    It must be said that most people do study a Masters first however.
    Do they? Must say that in my experience, few have a masters unless their first degree is at 2.2...
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Do they? Must say that in my experience, few have a masters unless their first degree is at 2.2...
    I should have said that I am talking only from the experiences of friends and their colleagues currently doing PhD's: most people at my university seem to have done a masters degree first.

    I accept though, that you, having completed a PhD yourself and therefore having far more experience than I in these matters, are likely to have a more correct view of the situation.

    Since I am considering going down the PhD route myself, I must say I am pleased to here you say that the majority don't seem to have done a masters (because of the extra expense it would cost me if I had to study one).
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    (Original post by nikk)
    I should have said that I am talking only from the experiences of friends and their colleagues currently doing PhD's: most people at my university seem to have done a masters degree first.

    I accept though, that you, having completed a PhD yourself and therefore having far more experience than I in these matters, are likely to have a more correct view of the situation.

    Since I am considering going down the PhD route myself, I must say I am pleased to here you say that the majority don't seem to have done a masters (because of the extra expense it would cost me if I had to study one).
    Erm, it really depends on the subject. Arts and Social Sciences an MA is a must, it all depends.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Erm, it really depends on the subject. Arts and Social Sciences an MA is a must, it all depends.
    I was talking about science subjects. I only got that impression because when discussing the fact I wanted to do a PhD, many of my friends (who are current PhD students) said that I would need a masters first. From the replies on this thread, it would seem that this is not actually the case (which I am very pleased about because masters fees are quite pricey!)
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    (Original post by nikk)
    I was talking about science subjects. I only got that impression because when discussing the fact I wanted to do a PhD, many of my friends (who are current PhD students) said that I would need a masters first. From the replies on this thread, it would seem that this is not actually the case (which I am very pleased about because masters fees are quite pricey!)
    What subject are you studying and how close to the end of your degree are you? A masters is good preparation for a PhD so it might be worth looking into it.
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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't a lot of programs allow you to do the Mphil and then either leave it at that, or have that go towards your PhD?
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    What subject are you studying and how close to the end of your degree are you? A masters is good preparation for a PhD so it might be worth looking into it.
    I am studying a BSc in Human Biology. I am just starting the 2nd year of the degree, but I have been thinking about this alot recently because I need to start saving money to cover the fees if I do choose a masters.

    In an ideal world, I would have saved up enough money so I can study a masters and then a PhD. But it would be nice, if it turned out I couldn't afford to study a masters, that I could apply straight for a PhD placement (classification pending of course).
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    (Original post by Clarkey_Berlin)
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't a lot of programs allow you to do the Mphil and then either leave it at that, or have that go towards your PhD?

    It depends - some places let you bail out of a PhD programme and write up for a masters (i.e if you fail the qualifying test after the 1st year - or at what ever point the dept you're in runs it's QT). However, you can't usually carry masters work on to PhD (certainly not at higher calibur unis), as the 'business case' for a PhD has to be build on some novel aspect. You can build on a masters but not resubmit work used for a masters as part of a PhD...
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    Higher calibur (SIC)? lol I don't know much about this, so I guess maybe it's not possible to do so
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    (Original post by nikk)
    I am studying a BSc in Human Biology. I am just starting the 2nd year of the degree, but I have been thinking about this alot recently because I need to start saving money to cover the fees if I do choose a masters.

    In an ideal world, I would have saved up enough money so I can study a masters and then a PhD. But it would be nice, if it turned out I couldn't afford to study a masters, that I could apply straight for a PhD placement (classification pending of course).
    I've got a feeling (vague one) that the bioscience funding council has changed completely over to new route PhDs (ie a masters (MRes usually) + PhD 4 year integrated course)...but of course that's no biggy because they're funding the masters years as well as the PhD years...

    If it's not policy now then I'm pretty sure it's something they're planning on moving towards over the next few years.
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    http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/funding/train...ps_booklet.pdf has got a bunch of info on funding (including masters funding) provided by the research council for biological sciences
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    BBSRC is going to 4 year masters (as are the MRC and the physicsy research council) - decision based on part by the recommendations of the Roberts Report.

    This is a generic 1st year (usually spent doing mini-projects and learning techniques), before starting your research proper in year 2, submitting in year 4.

    Shiny's D.Phil is following this model...
 
 
 
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