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    I've followed this philosophy since the new year, and I base it around every wight I lift not being heavy enough, every ergo rowing time not being good enough, every test/homework/study I do not being good enough, etc.

    So far it's worked very well, and I cant really say its affected my social life.

    Anyone else follow this path, or perhaps had any bad experiences of it?
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    ******** statement imo.

    My statement is..

    "The path to self-improvement is self-acceptance"
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    (Original post by Advanced Subsidiary)
    My statement is..

    "The path to self-improvement is self-acceptance"
    Nothing wrong with that, but wont get me in a 8's crew
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    (Original post by TheKlassicsKid)
    I've followed this philosophy since the new year, and I base it around every wight I lift not being heavy enough, every ergo rowing time not being good enough, every test/homework/study I do not being good enough, etc.

    So far it's worked very well, and I cant really say its affected my social life.

    Anyone else follow this path, or perhaps had any bad experiences of it?
    Same here. However, although I definitely have that thought, I didn't decide that because I thought it would be useful. It's just how my mind thinks. I feel really awful if I don't achieve my desired targets. I feel horrible if I don't do perfectly academically, if I'm not getting really good times for running, if I didn't manage to fully understand that French passage etc.

    I always have that voice of self-criticism in my head, and while it doesn't feel good, it's the only way I manage to motivate myself. It's sometimes counter-productive though. I feel bad even if I don't succeed something that's completely stupid. Like I feel bad if I lose at cards or a board game or something, which is of course completely ridiculous and pointless.

    This really isn't that uncommon by the way. Self-loathing is a part and parcel of ambition.
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    (Original post by TheKlassicsKid)
    I've followed this philosophy since the new year, and I base it around every wight I lift not being heavy enough, every ergo rowing time not being good enough, every test/homework/study I do not being good enough, etc.

    So far it's worked very well, and I cant really say its affected my social life.

    Anyone else follow this path, or perhaps had any bad experiences of it?
    There is a difference between 'this weight isn't heavy enough to get me where I want to I'd better lift more to get what I want' than 'this weight isn't heavy enough to get me where I want so I hate myself for not being there now'. I'd prefer the former tbh. It's an alright path but if you tell yourself you are not good enough and you actually aren't you'll be depressed and disappointed - I see that sometimes when people who work really hard and beat themselves up all the time are beaten by me - not because they don't hate themselves enough or because they don't do enough work but because I'm simply better than them at my worst. The solution tends to be more self hate as they think that it'll make them better but it won't so they end up depressed. Self hate is pretty useless tbh.
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    aaaah. a rower.
    nuff said
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    (Original post by .44_Magnum)
    There is a difference between 'this weight isn't heavy enough to get me where I want to I'd better lift more to get what I want' than 'this weight isn't heavy enough to get me where I want so I hate myself for not being there now'. I'd prefer the former tbh. It's an alright path but if you tell yourself you are not good enough and you actually aren't you'll be depressed and disappointed - I see that sometimes when people who work really hard and beat themselves up all the time are beaten by me - not because they don't hate themselves enough or because they don't do enough work but because I'm simply better than them at my worst. The solution tends to be more self hate as they think that it'll make them better but it won't so they end up depressed. Self hate is pretty useless tbh.
    And you go crazy trying to make sure you don't hate yourself.

    Again, the OP is making it seem like self-loathing is a fun choice people make when they want to achieve something. For him it might have been, but for most people it's not. FOr most people it's just a part of their personality.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    And you go crazy trying to make sure you don't hate yourself.

    Again, the OP is making it seem like self-loathing is a fun choice people make when they want to achieve something. For him it might have been, but for most people it's not. FOr most people it's just a part of their personality.
    Hatred for want of a better word, I cant think of a better one. I don't mean self-hatred in the same way as a depressed person, I just restrict it to arias in which I feel I need improving. I'm perfectly happy with my driving, for example
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    It works, but it doesn't make you feel particularly good. There's a fine line between thinking "every drawing I do could be improved" and thinking "no drawing I do is ever good enough".

    I'm never happy with what I accomplish, and I wish I could be. Architectural education tends to do that to people though.
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    I've never heard that one before. Surely self hatred causes psychological pathologies such as anorexia and obesity, and self harm, and depression. Hardly would call those improvement.
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    (Original post by TheKlassicsKid)
    Hatred for want of a better word, I cant think of a better one. I don't mean self-hatred in the same way as a depressed person, I just restrict it to arias in which I feel I need improving. I'm perfectly happy with my driving, for example
    Yeah - I think I would agree with you that bullying yourself into doing better would work, but only if you have the self esteem to want to prove yourself wrong.
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    The problem with that philosophy is that it does generally lead to what the person above has said and will most likely cause you to Burn Out, an actual medical condition, if you manage to keep it up. And burn outs, depression and all that will stop your progress dead in its tracks, possibly leading to a self hatred that doesn't give you improvements. I've tried stuff like that before but i realised it caused me to over do it so now i prefer to push myself hard but then when my body or my brain says that's enough then that's enough.
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    "One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important." - I work better that way. Reminds me to chillax.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Again, the OP is making it seem like self-loathing is a fun choice people make when they want to achieve something. For him it might have been, but for most people it's not. FOr most people it's just a part of their personality.
    I know, and it's largely unproductive. People should probably try and change their personality than reaching unattainable and useless goals.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Though obviously not to the same extent, even now I don't take losing well.

    And at times, even when it causes you pain, you know that you'd rather feel that self-loathing rather than let yourself regress to apathy. If I were consider my achievements good, then I'd be happy with what I've done. However, I see the inadequacy in them, and am driven to improve myself.

    I just can't see how you'd motivate yourself otherwise. The moment I feel any contentment with what I've done, I lose momentum. While that's nice, it makes you useless.
    You're in a catch 22 lol - if what you achieve is never good enough even when you've achieved the best you won't appreciate it or feel good about it, which brings one to the question of why you started in the first place.

    Improvement is a totally relative term, are you living your life for you or for other people. I scrape by because I need to money to lead the lifestyle I want to live and that often goes hand in hand with relative academic success, but it sounds like your self improvement is simply being better than other people which is ultimately a waste of time. Are you working to live, or living to work?
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    Lol, sounds like ******** to me. I'd rather just be happy with myself and do improvements because I want to acheive something, not because what I'm already doing isn't good enough.
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    I would argue that self-improvement is a waste of time. Self- destruction should be the aim of life.
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    I completely agree with this philosophy
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    (Original post by Fang_RedDragon)
    aaaah. a rower.
    nuff said
    haha! one up!
    My self improvement is self-love. but sometimes I go on this workaholic craze for about a day. Its most interesting.
 
 
 
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