ADHD in adults-please help? Watch

Bad A$$
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I met a girl two years who was incredibly hyper, unattentive, couldn't concentrate on anything, talks non-stop (literally), the list is endless. I usued to think she was a happy-go-lucky sort of person, you know the sort. However recently I spent a weekend with her and her behaviour was incredibly erratic. A light bulb went in my head just today and I thought 'She has ADHD!' so I searched for a list of the symptoms. I couldn't believe it, but she matched nearly all of them.

Here's the problem: All the information on the 'net indicated that most people develop it as children and grow out of it when they reach adulthood. My mate is 28 years old. I'm fairly sure she has it. How can I broach the subject with her and what can she do? Should she go to her GP, if she does what will the doctor recommend?
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SwampTurkey
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(Original post by Bad A$$)
I met a girl two years who was incredibly hyper, unattentive, couldn't concentrate on anything, talks non-stop (literally), the list is endless. I usued to think she was a happy-go-lucky sort of person, you know the sort. However recently I spent a weekend with her and her behaviour was incredibly erratic. A light bulb went in my head just today and I thought 'She has ADHD!' so I searched for a list of the symptoms. I couldn't believe it, but she matched nearly all of them.

Here's the problem: All the information on the 'net indicated that most people develop it as children and grow out of it when they reach adulthood. My mate is 28 years old. I'm fairly sure she has it. How can I broach the subject with her and what can she do? Should she go to her GP, if she does what will the doctor recommend?
I think most health professionals now think that a lot of people (~50%) will continue to have ADHD as adults, so I don't know where you got your stats from. So saying, the symptoms of ADHD are different in adults than they are in children too, so I'm not sure how accurate your diagnosis is.
Also: If she doesn't have an issue with how she is/if it's not affecting her life in any way, then there's nothing wrong with her. For ADHD/any behavioral/mental illness to be diagnosed, it has to be impacting negatively on your life. And if she's managed to reach the age of 28 with no major problems, I'm guessing she's fine.
So, maybe that's just the kind of person she is? :yep:
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Bad A$$
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(Original post by SwampTurkey)
I think most health professionals now think that a lot of people (~50%) will continue to have ADHD as adults, so I don't know where you got your stats from.
If you look at all the information you'll find that most of them state that kids grow out of it when they're older. Adults are usually only diagnosed if they can prove they had it when they were younger.


(Original post by SwampTurkey)
So saying, the symptoms of ADHD are different in adults than they are in children too, so I'm not sure how accurate your diagnosis is.
Yes, I know adult and children ADHD is different. I did Google everything before I posted on here. I'm certain she has it and that it's affecting her life. I could mention all the reasons but I'd be here a long time writing it up.

(Original post by SwampTurkey)
Also: If she doesn't have an issue with how she is/if it's not affecting her life in any way, then there's nothing wrong with her. For ADHD/any behavioral/mental illness to be diagnosed, it has to be impacting negatively on your life. And if she's managed to reach the age of 28 with no major problems, I'm guessing she's fine.
She has had major problems that affect her life. She doesn't realise how major they are (but I do), I don't want to list all the reasons but they're big. They include inability to hold down a steady job at the age of 28, relationships, friendships and so on.

(Original post by SwampTurkey)
So, maybe that's just the kind of person she is? :yep:
She could be so much more without the ADHD.
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Ilora-Danon
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My 28 yr old sister has ADHD and an adult diagnosis. It's very rare for adults to grow out of it. It's a mental illness. It's not something you just grow out of. The adult simply finds coping mechanisms and learns to adapt to adult life.

My sister will need Ritalin for the rest of her
life.
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SwampTurkey
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(Original post by Bad A$$)
If you look at all the information you'll find that most of them state that kids grow out of it when they're older. Adults are usually only diagnosed if they can prove they had it when they were younger.
:confused: I think the tide is turning more towards the 'it's a lifelong condition' stance, but OK. Yes, that's right, you have to have had it as a child (even if it went undiagnosed).

(Original post by Bad A$$)
She has had major problems that affect her life. She doesn't realise how major they are (but I do), I don't want to list all the reasons but they're big. They include inability to hold down a steady job at the age of 28, relationships, friendships and so on.
She could be so much more without the ADHD.
If they were that major, surely she would have realised? Idk, obviously you know your friend a lot better than I do - maybe try talking to her about it, especially if you're so worried? It's not like you can help her without her being on board. Good luck!
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Bad A$$
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(Original post by Ilora-Danon)
My 28 yr old sister has ADHD and an adult diagnosis. It's very rare for adults to grow out of it. It's a mental illness. It's not something you just grow out of. The adult simply finds coping mechanisms and learns to adapt to adult life.

My sister will need Ritalin for the rest of her
life.
That's sad to hear. The thing is, my mate, she has so much pride. She hates people saying anything negative about her. She also hates failure even though you might interpret many aspects of her life as being a bit of a failure (I'm sorry to say, but it's true). I doubt she would ever accept that she has it or try and do something about it. That's the thing that reallt irritates me because there's no way I can continue being her friend unless she deals with this. It is affecting our friendship.
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Ilora-Danon
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(Original post by Bad A$$)
That's sad to hear. The thing is, my mate, she has so much pride. She hates people saying anything negative about her. She also hates failure even though you might interpret many aspects of her life as being a bit of a failure (I'm sorry to say, but it's true). I doubt she would ever accept that she has it or try and do something about it. That's the thing that reallt irritates me because there's no way I can continue being her friend unless she deals with this. It is affecting our friendship.
Well to be honest, I think you'd both be better off without each other. You seem to be uncomfortable with accepting your friend's faults and it sounds like she needs support more than someone telling her what her failures are in life.

You seem excrutiatingly judgmental, so perhaps yes, you'd be better off if you weren't still friends with her.
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Bad A$$
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(Original post by Ilora-Danon)
Well to be honest, I think you'd both be better off without each other. You seem to be uncomfortable with accepting your friend's faults and it sounds like she needs support more than someone telling her what her failures are in life.

You seem excrutiatingly judgmental, so perhaps yes, you'd be better off if you weren't still friends with her.
You have completely misunderstood my post. I am merely stating the extent to which her illness has affected her life (too 'hyper' to hold down a job, friends not being able to 'get' her- I'm the only one who hasn't judged her and has stayed in contact with her the last two years). You've got to understand how difficult it is for others to maintain any sort of relationship with her. Life's a *****, but when you've could a fairly strong case of ADHD coupled with the fact that she's too proud to accept she has a mental illness, it can be too much for anyone.
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Revolutionary
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I had social anxiety. I'm just starting to recover from it. I thought life would get a bit easier now but this is not the case, man. When I used to get anxious I couldn't listen to somebody speaking, process the information and think of something to say in response. My mind would either become blank or wander.

I don't get so anxious anymore but the above problem still happens.

If I am able to follow and understand what a person is saying and I want to respond I find it very hard to remember simple words I would like use. Usually half way through a long sentence I usually forget what I'm trying to say.

Also, I find it extremely difficult to understand tones and facial expressions of people who ware talking to me. I don't know weather their being sarcastic or not, taking the piss out of me or not.

When I read, I have to re-read long sentences because I forget what it's saying by the time I finish.

I have an appointment with a doctor tomorrow to see if he can help me. I was never diagnosed as a child or even considered to have ADHD but I was very hyper and aggresive until 18 years of age because of bullying and peer pressure I went through.

To those that know a bit about Inattentive ADHD, do these sound like symptons?

Help me, man! Paleease
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