OCR M2 and M3 Watch

Farhan.Hanif93
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To anyone who's done these two modules, how much does M3 rely on M2 knowledge as I plan to self teach M3 in addition to my other taught modules next year (year 13) but I may not have done much M2 by that point.
Any information is much appreciated.
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nuodai
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M3 assumes M2 knowledge; if I recall correctly there's quite a lot of material which is independent, so if you're doing M2 alongside it then you can probably do it. An alternative is to self-teach both M2 and M3 (i.e. don't follow your lessons) and ask for help from your teacher if you need it, thereby covering all of M2 before you start M3 (but doing it all twice as fast). I did a similar thing with C2 when I was self-teaching C3 and C4 and it worked out pretty well.
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Farhan.Hanif93
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(Original post by nuodai)
M3 assumes M2 knowledge; if I recall correctly there's quite a lot of material which is independent, so if you're doing M2 alongside it then you can probably do it. An alternative is to self-teach both M2 and M3 (i.e. don't follow your lessons) and ask for help from your teacher if you need it, thereby covering all of M2 before you start M3 (but doing it all twice as fast). I did a similar thing with C2 when I was self-teaching C3 and C4 and it worked out pretty well.
Seems like a good idea, I think I may cover them both as much as I can over the summer and then polish them off for January or june or one for each exam period.
I realise that difficulty varies from person to person but relatively how hard would you say M3 is to M2?
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nuodai
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(Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
I realise that difficulty varies from person to person but relatively how hard would you say M3 is to M2?
Mechanics (and now Dynamics) has always been, and still is, my weak spot, so I found them both pretty difficult. I found some parts of M3 easier than parts of M2, because they use more actual maths and less setting up problems; but I found some parts of M2 easier than parts of M3 because they're conceptually easier, and there's less fiddly algebraic bits to do.

In terms of how I actually did, I got 82% in M2 and 72% in M3, so UMS scores would indicate that M3 is harder [but the truth is I revised more for M2 than for M3.]
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Farhan.Hanif93
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(Original post by nuodai)
Mechanics (and now Dynamics) has always been, and still is, my weak spot, so I found them both pretty difficult. I found some parts of M3 easier than parts of M2, because they use more actual maths and less setting up problems; but I found some parts of M2 easier than parts of M3 because they're conceptually easier, and there's less fiddly algebraic bits to do.

In terms of how I actually did, I got 82% in M2 and 72% in M3, so UMS scores would indicate that M3 is harder [but the truth is I revised more for M2 than for M3.]
In a way it's the opposite for me, my weak point lies in stats because I don't like senselessly applying formula without understanding why I'm doing it, which is the case with S1 at least. I find the concepts of the different types of combinations a permutation quite difficult to grasp. Probably my worst individual topic in Maths so far.
I'm primarily doing this for two reasons, one is that I want to avoid doing to much more stats or rely on it in any way for my FM grade. The other reason is that I enjoy it and universities seem to like more mechanics.
What sort of techniques do you think I should implement to learn M2 and M3 effectively well? i.e. reading the text book, practice exercises, examples or a combination of the lot etc?
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jj193
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I did M2 last summer, and self-taught myself M3 for January. The OCR wikibook on M3 is a very good place to get a taste of it in a short time. It builds on M2 for circular motion, Tension/SHM is hard but the exam questions are easy (infact, i reckon you could probably just memorise the formulas and just use them without a care).

The best part is moments, this is the hardest part. The questions on moments I find are long and you won't have a clue on the correct approach, just mess around.

To counter nuodai's UMS, I got 95% in M2 last june (and I had a few days to revise beforehand) but 100% in M3 (with 3 exams that day, 8 exams that week so alot less revision)

it does/can get frustrating at times and if your using the OCR book alot of it is waaaaay too hard so dont fret. I rarely got the correct answers when doing the misc exercises, the questions are badly worded in that book.

If you do physics, then you can skip most lessons too. The physics class will spend months on SHM/circular motion.
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Farhan.Hanif93
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Cheers for your advice guys, very helpful
Final question, how long do you think it should take to cover M2 and M3 enough to be in a position to get 90%+?
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ThisIsAbsolution
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M2 is actually ok once you understand, and i emphasis Fully understand every last concept and what they are asking- theres no point learning just formulas like Core

But M2 is fine, some parts of it like Moments and Rigid Bodies in Equilibrium are a bit trivial, but Circular motion, Work + Power, Coeffecients of restitution and momentum, finding centres of masses, Kinetic energy/GPE and Projectiles are easy enough

For following through from M1, SUVAT equations, Limiting Friction, resolving forces and forces that act on a particle on slopes is pretty much all you need to know

Also, what else are you taking along side M2 and M3 in further maths?
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Farhan.Hanif93
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(Original post by ThisIsAbsolution)
M2 is actually ok once you understand, and i emphasis Fully understand every last concept and what they are asking- theres no point learning just formulas like Core

But M2 is fine, some parts of it like Moments and Rigid Bodies in Equilibrium are a bit trivial, but Circular motion, Work + Power, Coeffecients of restitution and momentum, finding centres of masses, Kinetic energy/GPE and Projectiles are easy enough

For following through from M1, SUVAT equations, Limiting Friction, resolving forces and forces that act on a particle on slopes is pretty much all you need to know

Also, what else are you taking along side M2 and M3 in further maths?
fair enough, I'm doing FP1-3 and D1 or S2. My class might cover both so I might just sit one of them for the sake of it.
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jj193
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(Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
Cheers for your advice guys, very helpful
Final question, how long do you think it should take to cover M2 and M3 enough to be in a position to get 90%+?
It took me 25 hours to do M3. But it's best not to do too much at once because you'll get bored and start working slow/go on tsr:cool: .
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Farhan.Hanif93
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Right cheers for everything, will rep when I can
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QED
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I am finding M3 significantly easier to work for than M2.
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Farhan.Hanif93
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(Original post by QED)
I am finding M3 significantly easier to work for than M2.
Is this possibly because of the greater experience you now have in mechanics rather than when you started M2?
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QED
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(Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
Is this possibly because of the greater experience you now have in mechanics rather than when you started M2?
I think so, though (although I haven't started past papers just yet, judging from the miscellaneous exercise for M3) the questions have less variety in the approach you take, because conceptually it's far more difficult. Either that, or I have just sort of developed, I still expect to fail.
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ThisIsAbsolution
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(Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
fair enough, I'm doing FP1-3 and D1 or S2. My class might cover both so I might just sit one of them for the sake of it.
Yeah your doing almost the same that i am - FP1, M2, S1 this year, and FP2, FP3, M3 and S2 next year

Assuming you've already done M1, you shouldn't find it much different - its all about going slowly, annotating and diagrams; rushing through can cost you a lot, especially like forgetting to include gravity when asked about mass, or leaving out forces - they tend to have 9-10 mark questions, even 11 marks for one projectile question such as in Q8 for, http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/pp_07..._jan_l_gce.pdf , so precision is always key!
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QED
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(Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
fair enough, I'm doing FP1-3 and D1 or S2. My class might cover both so I might just sit one of them for the sake of it.
Sit S2, it's easy marks.
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ziedj
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(Original post by Farhan.Hanif93)
Is this possibly because of the greater experience you now have in mechanics rather than when you started M2?
My MEI M3 contents page:

Circular Motion (almost identical to what you'll do in A2 Physics, if you do that - i.e. not too hard.)

Elastic Springs and Strings (basically hookes law for every question, again it's in AS physics, just this time you need to consider a few more things in each question - essentially the same, though.)

Simple Harmonic Motion (yep, A2 physics again)

Centres of Mass (This uses integration and volumes of revolution about both axis to find centres of mass of solid objects and laminae etc, nice chapter.)

Dimensions and units (really easy, something you probably did all the time without realising it - considering that the units in equations need to match on both sides, so if you "assume" a relationship, let's say "I reckon the velocity of a sphere falling in liquid depends on, in some way, it's weight, the viscosity, and the radius of the sphere, and some constant". then you just see what the units are on the left, see what they therefore *must* be on the right, and form your relationship. they then normally go on to give you "values obtained in an experiment" so that you can find the constant term. it's an easy chapter but it has a nice feeling about it, in the way that it's really intuitive but at the same time interesting to learn about.)

I realise you're on OCR and I'm on MEI-OCR, but from my experience, it seems like M3 is much more in tune with solving problems, rather than "forming situations" like M1 and M2. In M2, you'd be told "this, this, this, and this are happening" and you need to model the situation. in M3, they give you the situation, and you work out the numbers. In that sense it's "easier", but the content itself is more advanced, so it balances.
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Farhan.Hanif93
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(Original post by ThisIsAbsolution)
Yeah your doing almost the same that i am - FP1, M2, S1 this year, and FP2, FP3, M3 and S2 next year

Assuming you've already done M1, you shouldn't find it much different - its all about going slowly, annotating and diagrams; rushing through can cost you a lot, especially like forgetting to include gravity when asked about mass, or leaving out forces - they tend to have 9-10 mark questions, even 11 marks for one projectile question such as in Q8 for, http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/pp_07..._jan_l_gce.pdf , so precision is always key!
Cheers for the tip, will be extra cautious when it comes to it. I'm guessing you did AS maths and FM in your first year and then the A2 modules the following year? My college does it a bit differently, where we cover the whole of A-Level maths this year and then FM next year.
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Farhan.Hanif93
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(Original post by ziedj)
My MEI M3 contents page:

Circular Motion (almost identical to what you'll do in A2 Physics, if you do that - i.e. not too hard.)

Elastic Springs and Strings (basically hookes law for every question, again it's in AS physics, just this time you need to consider a few more things in each question - essentially the same, though.)

Simple Harmonic Motion (yep, A2 physics again)

Centres of Mass (This uses integration and volumes of revolution about both axis to find centres of mass of solid objects and laminae etc, nice chapter.)

Dimensions and units (really easy, something you probably did all the time without realising it - considering that the units in equations need to match on both sides, so if you "assume" a relationship, let's say "I reckon the velocity of a sphere falling in liquid depends on, in some way, it's weight, the viscosity, and the radius of the sphere, and some constant". then you just see what the units are on the left, see what they therefore *must* be on the right, and form your relationship. they then normally go on to give you "values obtained in an experiment" so that you can find the constant term. it's an easy chapter but it has a nice feeling about it, in the way that it's really intuitive but at the same time interesting to learn about.)

I realise you're on OCR and I'm on MEI-OCR, but from my experience, it seems like M3 is much more in tune with solving problems, rather than "forming situations" like M1 and M2. In M2, you'd be told "this, this, this, and this are happening" and you need to model the situation. in M3, they give you the situation, and you work out the numbers. In that sense it's "easier", but the content itself is more advanced, so it balances.
How heavy are M2 and M3 in terms of volume of content i.e. more than/less than M1 etc.
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jj193
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Although it looks like there is a huge overlap with A2 physics, the A2 physics circular motion goes into less depth then M2 circular motion etc.. e.g. M3 => A2 physics, A2 physics =/=> M3
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