How easy is it to learn c++? Watch

Nambat
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I'm interested in programming and i heard C++ is the best place to start, i was wondering if anyone could send me a link to some tutorial websites that will tell me what type of programes i need to learn it?
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whitepearlbaby
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http://www.amazon.co.uk/Beginners-Gu...4552026&sr=8-1
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war833
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http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/

How easy it will be will depend on how naturally programming comes to you. If it's hard, then does it really matter? I'm sure everyone can get there eventually.
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Planto
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It's an impossible question to answer. It's not just about learning C++. it's about learning to program. In fact, it's not even just about learning to program, it's about learning to design algorithms. Wanting to learn to program and saying "how hard is C++" is a bit like wanting to become an engineer and asking how hard it is to work a screwdriver.
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somebody else
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It's probably not the best place to start. I started with C (as a university requirement) and although it was doable, something like python or java would have been much easier.
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Cromulent
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(Original post by Nambat)
i heard C++ is the best place to start
I'd be skeptical of anyone claiming C++ is the best beginners language out there. I started with C myself and whilst it has a lot of holes for newbies to fall into the terseness of the language and the comparatively short standards document mean you can get up to speed quite quickly if you expand enough effort.

C++ is orders of a lot more complex than C. Retaining all the same things that make C hard for newbies and adding many more in the process. I'd recommend C, before I recommended C++ and I would recommend C lightly.

Stick to Java or Python.
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matinthehat
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C++ is ok to learn as long as you can get your head around Object oriented programming and memory management ( pointers, freeing memory etc).
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Yacoby
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(Original post by Nambat)
I'm interested in programming and i heard C++ is the best place to start, i was wondering if anyone could send me a link to some tutorial websites that will tell me what type of programes i need to learn it?
If you ask people what language to start with, you will get a different answer every time.

However, C++ is horrendously complex and full of pitfalls. I would recommend something (anything) higher level than C++ (Avoid Assembly, C, D etc). C++ is also a very slow language to develop with compared to high level languages like Python or Haskell.
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Leon Trotsky
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Definitely easier than getting a girlfriend.
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Psyk
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(Original post by Addzter)
Definitely easier than getting a girlfriend.
So much truth in that statement:p:
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matinthehat
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I forgot to mention, you don't have to user OO in C++ if you don't want to.., but then its pretty much C except for some different syntax.
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war833
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(Original post by Yacoby)
If you ask people what language to start with, you will get a different answer every time.

However, C++ is horrendously complex and full of pitfalls. I would recommend something (anything) higher level than C++ (Avoid Assembly, C, D etc). C++ is also a very slow language to develop with compared to high level languages like Python or Haskell.
Naturally, there are disadvantages whichever language you choose. C++ can be just as productive as high-level languages assuming you know what you're doing and you have the right tools.
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Yacoby
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(Original post by war833)
Naturally, there are disadvantages whichever language you choose. C++ can be just as productive as high-level languages assuming you know what you're doing and you have the right tools.
It to some extent would depend on what you are doing, but I find almost everything else is faster simply because there is less chance of making mistakes due to memory management, no undefined behaviour, etc. For exmaple it is simply far easier to do something like download a file in Python or PHP due to the larger standard library. You aren't having to do something like use Boost.Asio.

(Original post by matinthehat)
I forgot to mention, you don't have to user OO in C++ if you don't want to.., but then its pretty much C except for some different syntax.
I find it better to treat them as two different languages. Good C++ code isn't going to be the same as good C code.
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devilcrack
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Forget C++ unless you actually need to learn it. Learn Java or C# as well as a functional language such as Haskell.
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mfaxford
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C / C++ are good if you want a really powerful multi-use tool. It is, however, harder to learn quickly to a good standard. If you have no other programing experience I'd recommend starting somewhere else (Java or Basic* for general programming or php for web stuff)

If you really want to learn C/C++ play with something else to get an idea of how things work then find a good book / tutorial for C and C++.

*Basic can be a good place to start as long as you actually write some code in it rather than just creating forms. If you start there I'd suggest moving to Java fairly quickly and then to C++ as that route will help introduce a few concepts at a time. Rather than having to get an understanding of OO, pointers, graphical libraries etc. all at once.
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Ewan
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I recommend this book if you decide to give Python a go.
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ish90an
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#17
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I would learn Java/Python first, there are too many pitfalls in languages like C and C++ because of pointers and memory access for beginners.
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Cromulent
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(Original post by Yacoby)
I find it better to treat them as two different languages. Good C++ code isn't going to be the same as good C code.
That is because they are two different languages.
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Yacoby
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(Original post by Cromulent)
That is because they are two different languages.
Yes. I know. Other people don't seem to have grasped this yet. There are still endless questions like "How can I find the maximum value of an integer in C/C++".

(It of course depends on the language as C doesn't have std::numeric_limits)
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