Law- Cambridge? Watch

scholarshipkid
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Hi, I'm trying to figure out whether applying to C'bridge to read Law is a realistic option for me. If anyone is a current student or applied could you give an indicator of grades? like what sort of gcses and in particular UMS at as level because I've heard that they ask for this as well?!
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defuzion
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One of my friends got accepted at Camebrdige for Law but got declined from LSE lol.

They would straightforwardly want A*AA predicted for A2, given your AS result. But even then its not just the grades that would get you in... it comes down to the interview/personal statement.
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scholarshipkid
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(Original post by defuzion)
One of my friends got accepted at Camebrdige for Law but got declined from LSE lol.

They would straightforwardly want A*AA predicted for A2, given your AS result. But even then its not just the grades that would get you in... it comes down to the interview/personal statement.

thanks what sort of subjects did he do at a level? does not doing A level law put you at a disadvantage?
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defuzion
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(Original post by scholarshipkid)
thanks what sort of subjects did he do at a level? does not doing A level law put you at a disadvantage?
No, not really. They wouldn't do that because there are so many schools that don't even do law (mine included).

They want hard a-level subjects. Not drama, sports studies, media, etc. (theres a list on their site I think, but I can't find it right now)
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SamKar
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My mate got into Cambridge last year with:

8A*s and 4As at GCSE
AAAA at A level
He took: History, English, Economics, Politics

It is a disadvantage if you take A level law because it gives people an unrealistic introduction to law

Any A levels are fine to be honest, Cambridge website says that science A level takers do just as well in law as A level students with Art subjects eg history

The best for law in my opinion are:
History, English, Business Studies/Economics, Foreign language
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Paine1
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(Original post by SamKar)
My mate got into Cambridge last year with:

8A*s and 4As at GCSE
AAAA at A level
He took: History, English, Economics, Politics

It is a disadvantage if you take A level law because it gives people an unrealistic introduction to law

Any A levels are fine to be honest, Cambridge website says that science A level takers do just as well in law as A level students with Art subjects eg history

The best for law in my opinion are:
History, English, Business Studies/Economics, Foreign language
I think it's worth defogging the massive assertion you just made here.

1. A-level Law is neither seen as an advantage nor a disadvantage; I was interviewed at Pembroke College having taking A-level Law. Furthermore, a good friend of mine was accepted at Trinity College having taken A-level Law. Do not be too hasty in dismissing its value.

2. Business Studies? Please. An applicant would be greater favoured if they presented A-level Law on their portfolio of subjects compared to Business Studies. However, I do approve of your other recommendations.


I was unsuccessful in gaining a place at Pembroke College. In my letter of explanation/feedback it was mentioned that, despite my "very solid" performance at interview, other candidates – also placed in this top category of interview performances – were stronger overall. Now, it went on to say that the average successful applicant had 8 A*s at GCSE and averaged in the mid-90% across their AS level scores.

My recommendation is therefore this: firstly, do not be put off taking A-level Law, it's a great subject; secondly, if you're fortunate enough to average in the mid 90s across your AS levels and boast GCSEs to match: apply to Cambridge. If, however, you have the GCSEs and the A grades at A-level – but do not average the mid 90s – then apply to Oxford. Unlike Cantab, Oxford do not ask for your UMS marks so would not know how strong your A grades were.

I hope this clears up a few bits of misleading information and helps you in your future endeavours; at any rate, good luck!
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jacketpotato
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Most people have about 90% UMS and at least 5-6 A* at GCSE. But there are also a lot who don't, much of it depends on circumstances: it is much easier to get 90% UMS from a top private or grammar school than it is from a comprehensive...

The reality is that A-level Law is not looked upon as favourably as traditional academic subjects. But this does depend on the college. Some colleges absolutely hate it; some don't mind it. It is a disadvantage, but you do find many people with one soft subject at Cambridge.
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willtang3000
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(Original post by jacketpotato)
Most people have about 90% UMS and at least 5-6 A* at GCSE. But there are also a lot who don't, much of it depends on circumstances: it is much easier to get 90% UMS from a top private or grammar school than it is from a comprehensive...

The reality is that A-level Law is not looked upon as favourably as traditional academic subjects. But this does depend on the college. Some colleges absolutely hate it; some don't mind it. It is a disadvantage, but you do find many people with one soft subject at Cambridge.
Totally disagree. I have an article conducted by AQA who were investigating whether taking Law at A-level puts potential candidates at a disadvantage. The only universities who stated taking Law is a disadvantage when offers are made is LSE and Manchester.
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Paine1
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(Original post by willtang3000)
Totally disagree. I have an article conducted by AQA who were investigating whether taking Law at A-level puts potential candidates at a disadvantage. The only universities who stated taking Law is a disadvantage when offers are made is LSE and Manchester.
Just to build on this point even further:

I have an offer from Manchester for Law having studied it at A-level. OK, I take four subjects but that doesn't change the fact that Law is one of those subjects. To build on the point even further, they gave me an offer of AAB – lower than their standard.
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maximusbarr
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(Original post by Paine1)
Just to build on this point even further:

I have an offer from Manchester for Law having studied it at A-level. OK, I take four subjects but that doesn't change the fact that Law is one of those subjects. To build on the point even further, they gave me an offer of AAB – lower than their standard.
I disagree and I'll tell you why, because you haven't started your degree yet. At A-level they give you a misconception of what law is, it is too easy from my experience (even though I did not do it, but my friends did who were average candidates at best and gained 98% overall). Many of the candidates that did law at A-level struggle, in my university many that did do law either got a 2.2, 3rd or have been kicked out. It's more of a disadvantage than an advantage. All the top law schools on their open days clearly states this. They tell you to 'unlearn' everything. Hence, Manchester and LSE, I would also add Birmingham, although it's not on the website, who state that law at A-level is a disadvantage.

If you feel you need to do or have commenced law at A-level by all means it is great, but it does not add anything, in terms of knowledge or understanding of the law. The difference between A-level law and degree level is enormous.
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Paine1
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(Original post by maximusbarr)
I disagree and I'll tell you why, because you haven't started your degree yet. At A-level they give you a misconception of what law is, it is too easy from my experience (even though I did not do it, but my friends did who were average candidates at best and gained 98% overall). Many of the candidates that did law at A-level struggle, in my university many that did do law either got a 2.2, 3rd or have been kicked out. It's more of a disadvantage than an advantage. All the top law schools on their open days clearly states this. They tell you to 'unlearn' everything. Hence, Manchester and LSE, I would also add Birmingham, although it's not on the website, who state that law at A-level is a disadvantage.

If you feel you need to do or have commenced law at A-level by all means it is great, but it does not add anything, in terms of knowledge or understanding of the law. The difference between A-level law and degree level is enormous.
I was not trying to make that point; what I was saying was that I don't think it disadvantages people as much as people argue it does during the admissions cycle.

I am well aware that the bridge between A-level Law and a Law degree is vast. However, I, personally, have taught myself A-level Law using degree textbooks – e.g. Jonathan Herring's Criminal Law for my Criminal Law Modules – I know what's coming my way at University and I feel prepared for it.
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jacketpotato
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(Original post by willtang3000)
Totally disagree. I have an article conducted by AQA who were investigating whether taking Law at A-level puts potential candidates at a disadvantage. The only universities who stated taking Law is a disadvantage when offers are made is LSE and Manchester.
That's a non-sequitur. Universities are generally reluctant to say that a subject puts people at a disadvantage unless it is a true mickey-mouse subject as that attracts controversy and raises accusations of elitism.
But you do not usually see law in lists of recommended subjects, see e.g. http://www.chu.cam.ac.uk/admissions/...g/courses/law/ (n.b. looks like they've removed a reference to disliking A-level law recently). Manchester and LSE are the only ones prepared to go out on a limb on this, but it is naive to think that Manch/LSE are completely on their own and that admissions tutors at other universities don't share that view.

There is also research indicating that law is less well regarded by employers and admissions tutors, see http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle5516630.ece.

The reality of the situation is that many tutors and many employers still see law as half-way between the traditional subjects like history and subjects like media studies. This is not justified, and indeed many admissions tutors do like law now and have moved with the times. But in my experience of talking to Oxbridge staff and partners at law firms it is the current reality.
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maximusbarr
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(Original post by Paine1)
I was not trying to make that point; what I was saying was that I don't think it disadvantages people as much as people argue it does during the admissions cycle.

I am well aware that the bridge between A-level Law and a Law degree is vast. However, I, personally, have taught myself A-level Law using degree textbooks – e.g. Jonathan Herring's Criminal Law for my Criminal Law Modules – I know what's coming my way at University and I feel prepared for it.
Nor was I, I don't think it disadvantages you in getting admissions, I have made that point, that would be just farcical. But once you are on the degree it's a completely different story. I know this because I have seen many around me who have struggled with degree level law, not because they are lacking in any sense, but the way of teaching at A-level and degree level is different. But most people pick up by the second semester. So not to worry, but it's better abstain from doing law at A-level. I was merely trying to make the point, that it may affect some more so than others.

Secondly, on your point about 'reading law degree books' - I think you might be surprised as to how difficult a law degree is. Simply reading a book of a higher standard than A-level does not render you 'prepared'. It's only on your first week that you realise the difficulty of it, bearing in mind 40 hours of reading is a must for law students, so don't under estimate it. But I'm sure you'll be fine
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jacketpotato
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(Original post by maximusbarr)
bearing in mind 40 hours of reading is a must for law students

I'm sure there are some people who actually do 40 hours of reading a week, but the rest of us never go anywhere near that, except perhaps just before exams
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maximusbarr
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LOL! Most don't but come exam time you realise if only you had. I'm guessing those that do get a 1st, probably did so consistently throughout the year.
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jacketpotato
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(Original post by maximusbarr)
LOL! Most don't but come exam time you realise if only you had. I'm guessing those that do get a 1st, probably did so consistently throughout the year.
Depends tbh

Some firsts were earned by people who did frankly ridiculous amounts of work. Others, not so much, though everybody who got a first did a reasonable amount of work.

Some people need to do a lot more work to get a first than others. A lot of it simply comes down to confidence and exam technique. Those who have the confidence to change textbooks if the recommended one doesn't work for them, and the confidence in essays to criticise judges and say that their tutors' research is completely wrong can get a first much more easily.
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ICQ
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sorry to go off on a tangent...do you reckon it's necessary to regularly attend lectures to do well in law? a friend of mine never went to any and ended up with a 1st, and is advising me not to bother really...
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Silvertongue
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Most people who apply to Cambridge will get 8 A*s and around 90+ UMS but that is just an average (with the exeption of Churchill College who have really high entrance standards). So I really wouldn't fuss about it and Cambridge are great for taking in mind one's schooling background.

Doing Law A level is neither an advantage or disadvantage. Someone asked this question at the open day during the lecture and that's what Professor Virgo replied with.
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jacketpotato
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(Original post by ICQ)
sorry to go off on a tangent...do you reckon it's necessary to regularly attend lectures to do well in law? a friend of mine never went to any and ended up with a 1st, and is advising me not to bother really...
I didn't either, and I did pretty well.

It largely depends on the person. Some people react well to lectures and struggle to recognise what is important or what to read without lectures, but some don't. To be honest, I think you should go to most lectures, though if you find a particular lecturer useless don't go to those lectures.
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ICQ
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thanks for the advice. did you not bother because you didn't find them useful, or was it because they're scheduled early in the morning?
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