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icecreamcake
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#2581
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#2581
(Original post by WinterWind)
Hello! We're the same age and I'm also preparing for a piano diploma! Rach's 2nd and 3rd are definitely my favourites, along with Chopin's two concertos! Did Grigory Sokolov win the III Tchaikovsky Competition at age 16 by playing Saint Saen's 2nd in the finals? Wow. I love it as well


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Yay!! Buddies! :3 what pieces are you playing/learning?
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icecreamcake
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#2582
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(Original post by keromedic)
Ooh cool. That's awesome. Did you get lessons at that age?
Oh no, of course not . I meant the 2015-2016 Grade 8 syllabus that was just released is better than the Grade 8 2013-2014 one.

Oh okay. Exams aren't everything . My old singing teacher went straight to Grade 8. It's not uncommon for people to skip exams . Good luck again!


Oh, that's cool. I was going to rush doing Grade 8 but I've decided to delay that for a bit. My sightreading sucks and as that's a major part of musicianship, I feel I need to practice it. I may end up doing Grade 8 in 2016, but even though that's later than my 'plan', there's no real rush.


Heya. That's awesome. Which would you say is easier to get Grade 8 in? I'm thinking of starting a stringed instrument. In fact, I already have a student violin.

Nice. Are you doing A level music? You'll probably get top marks if you play well. I played a Grade 7 piece for my Year 12 performance component and got near full marks.

OOh, lovely. I like some of those pieces as well . How do you structure your practice?


Haha
Aww thanks! I found the cello much easier- the pieces were so easy! Not sure if it was because my cello exam was a term after my piano exam, or whether it's because you only have to play one line of notes on the cello rather than loads of crazy complex chordal rhythms as on the piano :P but nevertheless, I still prefer the piano- it suits me better :3

And no I'm not going to take a level music. I took gcse music which I kind of hated but yeah the performances were super easy- I literally sightread a random piece that I learnt for a week and ended up with full marks with both of my performances... And this was in year 10 :/
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icecreamcake
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#2583
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#2583
(Original post by WinterWind)
Yes, I had been studying with the same teacher until 10 years old It wasn't very intensive though, mainly for fun I've been teaching myself since last year, it's great fun too! I can finally learn the pieces I've been dreaming to play.

I like the ABRSM syllabus a lot, but because they require Grade 8 for diploma exams I decided to go for Trinity in the end.


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Have you not done your grade 8 yet?! :O it's kind of bad to attempt a diploma without having done your grade 8 as grade 8 provides you with solid scales/techniques, sight reading, and aural/music awareness... If I were you, I'd quickly take my grade 8- plus it gets you ucas points!

Also, does the trinity diploma board not require a grade 8?!
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WinterWind
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#2584
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#2584
(Original post by strawberrysnow)
Have you not done your grade 8 yet?! :O it's kind of bad to attempt a diploma without having done your grade 8 as grade 8 provides you with solid scales/techniques, sight reading, and aural/music awareness... If I were you, I'd quickly take my grade 8- plus it gets you ucas points!

Also, does the trinity diploma board not require a grade 8?!
No, I haven't. My case is a bit different - I'm an international student. Before I came to the UK two years ago, I'd been taking music exams since age 5. But I haven't taken any exams in the UK yet, mainly due to the bad influence my second piano teacher left on me. I've got scared of playing in public by the time I came here. But then I was attracted to the diploma repertoire - there are many pieces that I've been wanting to play for a long time, so I decided to try to overcome my fear. Now it's getting much better I think Also in a way I see gaining a diploma as a reward for 13 years of study

I once considered taking grade 8, but since it's not required I decided to spend the time concentrating on my ATCL repertoire. (Trinity doesn't require any prerequisites for ATCL and LTCL)

I feel I can cope with the technical requirements of ATCL (thanks to Czerny's Etudes Op.740). As for sight reading, having been through self teaching kinda helps too. Music awareness and interpretation are probably the things I need to work hard on

Is it only grade 8 that's worth UCAS points?

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WinterWind
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#2585
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#2585
(Original post by strawberrysnow)
Yay!! Buddies! :3 what pieces are you playing/learning?
Apart from the 'lovely' Czerny's etudes, I'm now learning Beethoven's rage over a lost penny and Chopin's nocturne Op.9 No.1


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alex_hk90
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#2586
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#2586
(Original post by WinterWind)
Is it only grade 8 that's worth UCAS points?
I seem to recall getting some UCAS points for Grade 6. Not many though.
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WinterWind
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#2587
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#2587
(Original post by alex_hk90)
I seem to recall getting some UCAS points for Grade 6. Not many though.
Thanks


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mel c:)
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#2588
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#2588
The word's out on the street it's Bach-Beethoven-Liszt-Busoni time :cool: I'm in love with my next few pieces as I just chose them for LTCL diploma. Can't wait to work on them!!! Here's a taster, this'll be my second Liszt piece which I worked on fully and will hopefully bring together my own interpretation of, however Cziffra's version as well as Berman's is beautiful : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVufqYZhqEE
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WinterWind
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#2589
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#2589
(Original post by mel c:))
The word's out on the street it's Bach-Beethoven-Liszt-Busoni time :cool: I'm in love with my next few pieces as I just chose them for LTCL diploma. Can't wait to work on them!!! Here's a taster, this'll be my second Liszt piece which I worked on fully and will hopefully bring together my own interpretation of, however Cziffra's version as well as Berman's is beautiful : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVufqYZhqEE
Good luck with your LTCL! BTW, I saw on your profile that you like figure skating? I'm a huge fan of this sport! (although I can't really skate) My profile photo is Yulia Lipnitskaya, my favourite skater


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Fan service
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#2590
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Hey piano people I've been practicing piano independently for a few months now and figured there might be more experienced and more skilled pianists here that could help me figure some things out.

I was wondering whether any of you guys have a relatively short hand span for the piano (I reach an octave fully stretched out), but have still managed to learn repertoire with octaves in succession without any strain or injury? I'm learning a couple that I didn't expect to have octaves in them and it's always an obstacle playing past them. Normally when it's just a complex passage I can slow down and practice but it doesn't seem to work that way when I'm playing something at the very edge of my reach. Error is almost guaranteed at full speed no matter how often I run through it. The ending of Chopin's op. 9 no. 2 is something I doubt I'll ever be able to make perfect. If my reach was just a key longer it would be so much easier... pretty sure people who can play a 10th or more wouldn't have this problem

Also, I'm really interested to learn how some of you guys were taught how to play polyrhythms (or cross rhythms or whatever they're called) in sheet music. Is there a common method to figure out when the notes fall? Can anyone give examples of pieces learnt and how you practice/have practiced cross rhythms?

PS I send infinite love to the person who mentioned Rach's 2nd piano concerto. I bought tickets to the Proms to hear it live on September 7th u so jelly haw haw haw
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Kvothe the Arcane
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#2591
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#2591
(Original post by Fan service)
...
Welcome to this thread.
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icecreamcake
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#2592
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#2592
(Original post by Fan service)
Hey piano people I've been practicing piano independently for a few months now and figured there might be more experienced and more skilled pianists here that could help me figure some things out.

I was wondering whether any of you guys have a relatively short hand span for the piano (I reach an octave fully stretched out), but have still managed to learn repertoire with octaves in succession without any strain or injury? I'm learning a couple that I didn't expect to have octaves in them and it's always an obstacle playing past them. Normally when it's just a complex passage I can slow down and practice but it doesn't seem to work that way when I'm playing something at the very edge of my reach. Error is almost guaranteed at full speed no matter how often I run through it. The ending of Chopin's op. 9 no. 2 is something I doubt I'll ever be able to make perfect. If my reach was just a key longer it would be so much easier... pretty sure people who can play a 10th or more wouldn't have this problem

Also, I'm really interested to learn how some of you guys were taught how to play polyrhythms (or cross rhythms or whatever they're called) in sheet music. Is there a common method to figure out when the notes fall? Can anyone give examples of pieces learnt and how you practice/have practiced cross rhythms?

PS I send infinite love to the person who mentioned Rach's 2nd piano concerto. I bought tickets to the Proms to hear it live on September 7th u so jelly haw haw haw
Omgomgomgomg Rach's 2nd LIVE AT THE PROMS OMG SO JELLY ;_;

And don't worry, I can't even reach an octave properly without doing this really awkward and painful stretch at the side of the piano yet I already got distinction for my grade 8 piano (and cello). You just have to choose your repertoire/pieces very carefully (which sucks because I know that there are some lovely piano pieces which I can never play because I can't stretch it). It gets a bit trickier at diploma (which I'm currently doing) because ALL of the pieces contain octaves but you just have to live with it and choose pieces with the least ocatves/stretches (which again limit your repertoire choice unfortunately).

Oh and polyrhythms... idk try playing the passage slowly? I don't really know how to answer this question because polyrhythms always came really naturally for me :/

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#2593
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#2593
(Original post by strawberrysnow)
Omgomgomgomg Rach's 2nd LIVE AT THE PROMS OMG SO JELLY ;_;

And don't worry, I can't even reach an octave properly without doing this really awkward and painful stretch at the side of the piano yet I already got distinction for my grade 8 piano (and cello). You just have to choose your repertoire/pieces very carefully (which sucks because I know that there are some lovely piano pieces which I can never play because I can't stretch it). It gets a bit trickier at diploma (which I'm currently doing) because ALL of the pieces contain octaves but you just have to live with it and choose pieces with the least ocatves/stretches (which again limit your repertoire choice unfortunately).

Oh and polyrhythms... idk try playing the passage slowly? I don't really know how to answer this question because polyrhythms always came really naturally for me :/
I kno riiight :P and thanks for answering. Do you have any favorite pieces that don't have many stretchy reaches?

The main reason I asked about polyrhythms is because I'm going through a chopin piece and just 20 bars in I've seen 4 notes against 3, 6 against 4, 9 against 6, it takes me a long time to put hands together and play a passable rhythm I worry I'll give up on it out of difficulty, but I don't wanna.
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icecreamcake
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#2594
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(Original post by Fan service)
I kno riiight :P and thanks for answering. Do you have any favorite pieces that don't have many stretchy reaches?

The main reason I asked about polyrhythms is because I'm going through a chopin piece and just 20 bars in I've seen 4 notes against 3, 6 against 4, 9 against 6, it takes me a long time to put hands together and play a passable rhythm I worry I'll give up on it out of difficulty, but I don't wanna.
It sounds like you're playing Fantasie Impromptu xD that has 3 against 4 at PRESTO from the first bar lol but I guess just try and practice slow and build up speed? What I did was just try and get a feel of the polyrhythms and eventually with practice, it all came together nicely

Oh wait you said Chopin's op9 no2 right? Well that has much easier rhythms than his other pieces especially since it's quite a slow and peaceful (and to be honest, one of his easiest works) nocturne! For that piece, slow practice is key from what I remember (I played it for a small piano recital/concert when I was 12 so I don't really remember much)!

Umm well my favourite composer is Chopin but a lot of his pieces are quite stretchy... which is so sad :'( Mozart is always good because it requires fast finger-work rather than strenuous octaves so yeah he's always good Other classical composers are generally good too. Romantic pieces that I've played before that do not require too many octaves are Chopin's op9 no2 (obvs), his Fantasie Impromptu, his Scherzo no.1 and his Etude op25 no 12 (I think.. he has too many etudes that I can't remember which is which xD - anyway the etude I'm talking about has very fast arpeggio-y finger work that helps you get a light delicate touch and flexible wrists, as well as obviously great finger-work). Oh and also, his etude op 25 no12 I think?? it was nicknamed 'Ocean' I think and that is very very arpeggio-y and to be frank, quite repetitive and boring, but basically no octaves. I've also played Beethoven's moonlight sonata mov.3 which isn't too bad. Liszt's Liebestraume (not sure if I spelt that right) no.3 is good too (although there are quite a few fast octave-y bits which you'll just have to make do with but it's definitely one of his more less-octave-y pieces). Also, as much as you may like Rachmaninoff, stay away with him because all his pieces require monster hands. Literally. Oh and Grieg's Wedding March (I think it was called) has few octaves which is unusual because all his works are so stretchy too so go and play that!

Hope that helps! And no problem, I love to help budding pianists
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#2595
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#2595
(Original post by strawberrysnow)
It sounds like you're playing Fantasie Impromptu
Nothing that hard! Very slowly going through op 27 no 2 (chopin), it's soo gurd

Well it's encouraging to know I'm not supposed to figure out some complex way of practicing lol. I know what you mean about Chopin (and Rachmaninoff :'( tragic), Liebestraume's a long term goal of mine actually, but I'm putting it off until I know for certain that I can handle octaves in easier pieces haha, that and Un Sospiro. Thanks for the other suggestions, I'll look into them
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icecreamcake
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#2596
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#2596
(Original post by Fan service)
Nothing that hard! Very slowly going through op 27 no 2 (chopin), it's soo gurd

Well it's encouraging to know I'm not supposed to figure out some complex way of practicing lol. I know what you mean about Chopin (and Rachmaninoff :'( tragic), Liebestraume's a long term goal of mine actually, but I'm putting it off until I know for certain that I can handle octaves in easier pieces haha, that and Un Sospiro. Thanks for the other suggestions, I'll look into them
Fantasise impromptu is really not that hard - it's easier than it sounds and if you get a hang of playing 3 against 4 at presto, the piece is really quite easy to learn so don't be put off by it!

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Kvothe the Arcane
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#2597
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#2597
(Original post by strawberrysnow)
Fantasise impromptu is really not that hard - it's easier than it sounds and if you get a hang of playing 3 against 4 at presto, the piece is really quite easy to learn so don't be put off by it!

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It is...
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icecreamcake
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#2598
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#2598
(Original post by keromedic)
It is...
It's not... I learnt it (and had to play it for 2 different concerts from memory) when I was only 13 and I found it a pretty easy and straightforward piece...
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Kvothe the Arcane
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#2599
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(Original post by strawberrysnow)
It's not... I learnt it (and had to play it for 2 different concerts from memory) when I was only 13 and I found it a pretty easy and straightforward piece...
:emo:

*feels even rubbisher*
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icecreamcake
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#2600
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#2600
(Original post by keromedic)
:emo:

*feels even rubbisher*
Sorry! I wasn't trying to boast or make you feel bad but I'm just saying that it's not as hard as it sounds so don't be afraid of trying to attempt it! And it's one of Chopin's much more approachable works
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