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    Greetings fellow pianists,

    I am currently studying for my DipABRSM.

    I'm doing...

    Scarlatti Sonata K466 (one piece not on syllabus)
    Beethoven Sonata opus 10 no. 2 in F major
    Chopin Nocturne opus 62 no. 2
    Prokofiev Visions Fugitives 8,14,19 and 20.

    Oh, and my teacher will be this guy next year:

    http://www.ruthrogers.net/alvin_pr.html

    Does anyone who's performed these pieces have any words of advice?
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    Oh, and favourite pieces:

    1. Grieg Piano Concerto in A minor.
    2. Rachmaninov Prelude in G minor, opus 23 no. 5.
    3. Liszt: La Campanella
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    Don't know any of those pieces, but good luck With any luck a year or two after you take it (like me) you'll be able to look back and not wince
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    Very promising that you're choosing Scarlatti there. Well done.

    Haven't performed any of those pieces, or even worked on them a little . . .


    Good luck though!
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    (Original post by wellison999)
    Chopin
    I am learning this right now. Not sure what kind of advice you're looking for -- interpretation wise or technique? Most of it's pretty standard, and can be learned doing the standard things (runs both ways, &c). The middle section is a *******, though. I think you just have to practise the right hand by itself a lot. Do the outer melody (with correct fingering) alone, then add the synchopated inner bits. But unless your RH is strong anyway (I guess it is if you're at this level) it will be a lost cause, and you'll need to do some Hanon and Dohnanyi. Adding the left hand under it is also hard. Again, I can only suggest separate practise, + slow combining.

    I do think, though, that this piece has a strong contrapuntal element which you really need to bring out, everything from the close of the first section (halfway down page 2) and the middle.
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    ^^ Actually, here is good advice: listen to pianists who are strong interpreters of those composers, either playing those pieces, or others by the composers. I think you need to answer questions on intepretation anyway, so if you can say "Moseiwitch does this" but "Pires does that" or whatever, that will be good.

    Anyway, there is a Horowitz CD of Scarlatti, which is about the only Horowitz I like, and he plays that sonata on it. Also, get hold of Clara Haskill playing some Scarlatti, it is lip-smacking good. Pogorelich's CD is good too. EDIT: And Robert Casadeus!

    Beethoven: Kempff (1950s) is staggering, I think. THere is also a (good quality) Horszowski recording of that sonata on BBC legends. That whole CD is indispensible anyway. His Chopin on there is also a great indicator of how to manage rubato.

    Prokofiev: Richter and Argerich Boris Bermann's sonatas selection is also good.

    But those guys are very good benchmarks in these composers.
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    La campanella is killing my right hand with the huge leaps :s:
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    (Original post by Da Bachtopus)
    I am learning this right now. Not sure what kind of advice you're looking for -- interpretation wise or technique? Most of it's pretty standard, and can be learned doing the standard things (runs both ways, &c). The middle section is a *******, though. I think you just have to practise the right hand by itself a lot. Do the outer melody (with correct fingering) alone, then add the synchopated inner bits. But unless your RH is strong anyway (I guess it is if you're at this level) it will be a lost cause, and you'll need to do some Hanon and Dohnanyi. Adding the left hand under it is also hard. Again, I can only suggest separate practise, + slow combining.

    I do think, though, that this piece has a strong contrapuntal element which you really need to bring out, everything from the close of the first section (halfway down page 2) and the middle.
    Thanks for the advice - I have practised the middle section quite a lot and am beginning to be able to get it to decent-ish speed. It's definitely the hardest bit of the piece.
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    OK,hi everyone. Since there is a piano thread, I might as well join in.

    I recently passed ATCL recital in piano. (I found out on Wednesday).

    My 3 favourite pieces at the moment are:

    1. Chopin raindrop prelude
    2. Debussy clair de lune
    3. Chopin Revolutionary etude

    Question to those who have done ATCL/DipABRSM. Is anyone actually doing anything with it.E.g teaching
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    (Original post by antagonist)
    OK,hi everyone. Since there is a piano thread, I might as well join in.

    I recently passed ATCL recital in piano. (I found out on Wednesday).

    My 3 favourite pieces at the moment are:

    1. Chopin raindrop prelude
    2. Debussy clair de lune
    3. Chopin Revolutionary etude

    Question to those who have done ATCL/DipABRSM. Is anyone actually doing anything with it.E.g teaching
    Congratulations

    I passed my CertGSMD (now supplanted by the ATCL) 2 years ago now, and haven't done anything with it :o: I think that realistically most people would expect a higher diploma or proper teaching qualification to teach, but I have known it be done foor far far less.
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    Thanks.

    I guess if I am not doing anything "with it" then its nice to have a formal qualification to recognise the skill (and little letters behind my name...lol...)
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    OK

    I have this strange desire to do my LGSMD. I have no idea why, I didn't want to do it over the two years since I did my Cert. Something has changed however.

    Should I do it? Is it even possible to self-teach yourself a higher diploma while at university? Maybe I should just start playing properly again and ssee how it goes.
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    I am a lowly Grade 8 pianist come the end of this month... :o:

    All you people with your Diplomas! Sheesh, god only knows if I'll ever be as good as you guys! :rolleyes:

    Preparations for my exam are going well, but Aural tests = slow torture, I swear.

    For those interested...I'm doing the following pieces:

    Scarlatti - Sonata in A Minor K175
    Mozart - Allegro, First Movement from Sonata in F, K332
    Copland - Jazzy, No.3 from Three Moods

    Proper scared!
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    (Original post by pinkpenguin)
    I am a lowly Grade 8 pianist come the end of this month... :o:

    All you people with your Diplomas! Sheesh, god only knows if I'll ever be as good as you guys! :rolleyes:

    Preparations for my exam are going well, but Aural tests = slow torture, I swear.

    For those interested...I'm doing the following pieces:

    Scarlatti - Sonata in A Minor K175
    Mozart - Allegro, First Movement from Sonata in F, K332
    Copland - Jazzy, No.3 from Three Moods

    Proper scared!
    Hey,everyone's got to start somewhere. You will get there.Once you get past Grade 8 scales,aural,sight-reading are all gone.


    (Original post by ukebert)
    OK

    I have this strange desire to do my LGSMD. I have no idea why, I didn't want to do it over the two years since I did my Cert. Something has changed however.

    Should I do it? Is it even possible to self-teach yourself a higher diploma while at university? Maybe I should just start playing properly again and ssee how it goes
    According to the Trinity College website,the LGSMD/LTCL is equal to the "performance component of a full-time undergraduate course at a conservatoire or other higher education establishment."
    So if you could find someone to teach you at that level,go for it.(My piano teacher wouldn't after I did ATCL) Otherwise you could learn it yourself. But its better to have some guidance along the way.

    I am tempted to do my LTCL after I finish my course at university in 3 years when I get the time.
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    I'm finishing Piano grades when i've done my Grade 7 on 24th Nov. I want to enjoy it and not o stupid grades any longer!
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    Me join troo plz
    username: unikq

    grade: grades are for secondary school geek show offs

    current repetoire: grieg piano concerto a min
    chopin sonata no.3
    lizst concerto (first one)
    rach 2 (i physically can't get around the chords :s:)
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    Am listening to Nelson Freire's Chopin CDs. Unbelievable stuff, the études are even better than Perahia's. Go buy now. Here's his wrong-note étude: the figuration in the RH during the middle seciton is astonishingly clear, as are the 'inner voice' bits in the outer sections.

    http://sharebee.com/89f8d62e
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    Hello all, I was just wondering whether any of you use or have used any of the 'Hanon' books? The ones with different scales and the like?
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    (Original post by gooner1991)
    Hello all, I was just wondering whether any of you use or have used any of the 'Hanon' books? The ones with different scales and the like?
    It's only one book, called something absurd like "The Virtuoso Pianist in 71 Exercises". Yes, I play the first ten exercises through twice every time I practise: they're very useful. The rest is ******** (I mean, the first 20 are OK, the rest are just scales and such, but I don't really see the point in learning 11-20). Dohnanyi is also worth a look.

    You have to play them properly for them to be useful, though. Lift the fingers high and articulate each note. Make sure they're very even. Be warned though that you shouldn't play in pieces like you play the Hanon: they're to strengthen the fingers, and get you used to articulating things, but can develop an approach with too much wrist tension. But as a warm up, I'd say they're only second to Chopin 10/1
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    (Original post by gooner1991)
    Hello all, I was just wondering whether any of you use or have used any of the 'Hanon' books? The ones with different scales and the like?
    Hanon... oh boy...
    i used them when i started out on the piano - and i literally wept because of it... i think it's good for technique though... but be prepared to be VERY patient, because that book is an absolute biatch
 
 
 
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