Successful Oxbridge applicants? Are either of ur parents teachers??!! Watch

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loopy2
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Not sour grapes just curious. 4 of the people I know who've got a place this year just happen to have one parent (their mum) who's a teacher. Also my neighbour who has got all her four children into Oxford over the last 6 years is also a teacher. And her kids definitely applied for undersubscribed no-hoper courses. Interested to hear ur views. Think about it.
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MadNatSci
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(Original post by loopy2)
Not sour grapes just curious. 4 of the people I know who've got a place this year just happen to have one parent (their mum) who's a teacher. Also my neighbour who has got all her four children into Oxford over the last 6 years is also a teacher. And her kids definitely applied for undersubscribed no-hoper courses. Interested to hear ur views. Think about it.

No... I'm the first person in my close family to go to university!
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redcat
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(Original post by loopy2)
Not sour grapes just curious. 4 of the people I know who've got a place this year just happen to have one parent (their mum) who's a teacher. Also my neighbour who has got all her four children into Oxford over the last 6 years is also a teacher. And her kids definitely applied for undersubscribed no-hoper courses. Interested to hear ur views. Think about it.
what is your definition of an 'undersubscribed no-hoper course'?
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loopy2
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(Original post by redcat)
what is your definition of an 'undersubscribed no-hoper course'?
classics (one in 1.7 chance to get a place) and geography (one in 3)
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MadNatSci
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(Original post by loopy2)
classics (one in 1.7 chance to get a place) and geography (one in 3)
!!!! No-hoper?? Hope you can justify that.
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fishpaste
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I know absolutely tonnes, you're right, teachers are good at this sort of thing, I can think of around 10 off the top of my head.
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Kalypso
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mine aren't. I'm at Oxford already, but seemingly doing a no-hoper course...:O
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dazmanultra
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I applied for Computer Science at Robinson College, Cambridge a year ago - they had 8 places and i was one of about 80 interviewed... not really surprising i didn't get in!
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TK
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only 1 person i know who's got an offer has a parent who's a teacher. my bro applied to Cambridge twice and got rejected both times and both my parents are teachers - feel better?
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lala
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(Original post by grey faerie)
mine aren't. I'm at Oxford already, but seemingly doing a no-hoper course...:O
I know, what a stupid thing to say. I dont know what you do, but one thing I've noticed with classicists in particular is that they all seem to be scarily into and amazing at their subjects. Which kind of undermines his point...
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AmyBlue
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well out of the people i know who went to Oxbridge, 1 person has a teacher parent, and of the ones rejected quite a few have teacher parents!! it seems quite an odd link, from my school the 3 people who got in have brown eyes, and the 3 rejects have blue eyes....maybe thats a factor
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loopy2
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(Original post by lala)
I know, what a stupid thing to say. I dont know what you do, but one thing I've noticed with classicists in particular is that they all seem to be scarily into and amazing at their subjects. Which kind of undermines his point...

One thing I've noticed about classicists is that they are virtually all privately educated because I guess state schools don't do as much latin or Greek!! There seem to be an awful lot of classicists around now: any link between that and fact that state schools are getting a fairer crack or the whip?! Or do they really ALL adore their subject..I doubt it..
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MadNatSci
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(Original post by loopy2)
One thing I've noticed about classicists is that they are virtually all privately educated because I guess state schools don't do as much latin or Greek!! There seem to be an awful lot of classicists around now: any link between that and fact that state schools are getting a fairer crack or the whip?! Or do they really ALL adore their subject..I doubt it..

The classicists I know all adore their subject. It's probably a subject that's fairly easy to become very involved by if you think about how fascinating some of those ancient civilisations were. What are you trying to imply here? That if you go to an independent school you pick classics as your only route in?! Don't be ridiculous: the tutors wouldn't let people in if they didn't think they were good enough. If a college had five applicants for Classics and none of them were good enough, none of them would get in. It happens.
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aliel
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My mother is a teacher..but did not help me with my application to Oxford! And if i had asked for help, she'd have laughed at me :rolleyes:
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loopy2
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(Original post by MadNatSci)
The classicists I know all adore their subject. It's probably a subject that's fairly easy to become very involved by if you think about how fascinating some of those ancient civilisations were. What are you trying to imply here? That if you go to an independent school you pick classics as your only route in?! Don't be ridiculous: the tutors wouldn't let people in if they didn't think they were good enough. If a college had five applicants for Classics and none of them were good enough, none of them would get in. It happens.

Yes, that's exactly what I'm implying. The classicists I know (currently 4 at Oxford) all wanted to apply for other courses but then discovered their chances of getting in would be negligible (ie English, history) so switched to apply for classics. So maybe those who don't think this is fair actually have the last laugh.... Also, don't forget that if applicants aren't good enough to get in that means that the dons would be out of a job....
Remember what Charles Clarke said about classics...
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Lurker
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(Original post by loopy2)
Not sour grapes just curious. 4 of the people I know who've got a place this year just happen to have one parent (their mum) who's a teacher. Also my neighbour who has got all her four children into Oxford over the last 6 years is also a teacher. And her kids definitely applied for undersubscribed no-hoper courses. Interested to hear ur views. Think about it.
I just got in (obviously to a no-hoper subject, since there's about 3/4 applicants to each place :rolleyes: )
Neither of my parents are teachers.
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Lucy
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I received an offer for medicine and neither of my parents are teachers and none of my family (immediate or extended) have ever studied at oxbridge. I seriously doubt that people with teacher-parents have any advantage over the applicants who don't (that is if they even receive any help!) unless perhaps their parent teaches at oxbridge and is eager to get involved in the application process.
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Alexander
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As someone who has just been rejected by Oxford for Classics I feel that I must protest that it is not an easy subject to get an offer for.

Firstly the figure 1.7 applicants per place is out-of-date, applications have gone up significantly in the past couple of years (I remember fairly recently reading an article in The Times about it). This is due to the encouragement of more people who have only had the chance to do Latin to apply, possibly amongst other factors.

Secondly, what lala and MadNatSci say is absolutely true, Classics is certainly not a subject people tend to fall into doing without thinking about it, the people who do decide to do it are always very dedicated and good at it. Thus I would suggest that Oxbridge Classics applicants are on average of an even higher standard and have more enthusiasm for the subject than most Oxbridge applicants.
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loopy2
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(Original post by Lucy)
I received an offer for medicine and neither of my parents are teachers and none of my family (immediate or extended) have ever studied at oxbridge. I seriously doubt that people with teacher-parents have any advantage over the applicants who don't (that is if they even receive any help!) unless perhaps their parent teaches at oxbridge and is eager to get involved in the application process.
Well done for that and for doing such a valuable degree.... but I wasn't necessarily implying that teacher-parents 'help' but that their very attitude to education has an enormous impact on their children.They know, from what they've learned, how to get the best out of their children/pupils whatever,,,
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loopy2
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(Original post by Alexander)
As someone who has just been rejected by Oxford for Classics I feel that I must protest that it is not an easy subject to get an offer for.

Firstly the figure 1.7 applicants per place is out-of-date, applications have gone up significantly in the past couple of years (I remember fairly recently reading an article in The Times about it). This is due to the encouragement of more people who have only had the chance to do Latin to apply, possibly amongst other factors.

Secondly, what lala and MadNatSci say is absolutely true, Classics is certainly not a subject people tend to fall into doing without thinking about it, the poeple who do decide to do it are always very dedicated and good at it. Thus I would suggest that Oxbridge Classics applicants are on average of an even higher standard and have more enthusiasm for the subject than most Oxbridge applicants.
Plu-eeze. Pull the other one...
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