Successful Oxbridge applicants? Are either of ur parents teachers??!! Watch

This discussion is closed.
Alexander
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#21
Report 16 years ago
#21
(Original post by loopy2)
Plu-eeze. Pull the other one...
Well, what do you believe is false or fallacious in what I say?
0
Lurker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#22
Report 16 years ago
#22
(Original post by loopy2)
Plu-eeze. Pull the other one...
Why do you find it so hard to believe that some people just find a subject really interesting, and don't care about entrance statistics?
1
loopy2
Badges: 0
#23
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#23
(Original post by Lurker)
Why do you find it so hard to believe that some people just find a subject really interesting, and don't care about entrance statistics?
Because I KNOW 4 CLASSICISTS who have told me why they applied to do their subject...but of course they wouldn't let it get around the uni would they? And everybody cares about entrance statistics. You run the risk of sounding naive...
0
Alexander
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#24
Report 16 years ago
#24
Well I've known many people (by which I mean a couple of dozen at least) who have applied for Classics and none of them have ever given any hint that their choice of subject was anything to do with the higher-than-average statistical chance of an Oxbridge offer -- instead they all genuinely loved the subject. In fact I don't think I've ever heard a classicist mention it, and I do move in classicists' circles.
0
MadNatSci
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#25
Report 16 years ago
#25
(Original post by loopy2)
Because I KNOW 4 CLASSICISTS who have told me why they applied to do their subject...but of course they wouldn't let it get around the uni would they? And everybody cares about entrance statistics. You run the risk of sounding naive...

OK, so even assuming that it's an easy course to get on to - with which I disagree entirely but you're obviously not going to be swayed - are you suggesting that Classics is an 'easy' degree? Classics at Oxford is considered to be just about the hardest degree you can take in the UK - this, incidentally, was told to me by someone who graduated from Cambridge with a degree in Natural Sciences, so no bias there. I can't imagine people would embark on this degree course lightly.
1
Lurker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#26
Report 16 years ago
#26
(Original post by loopy2)
Because I KNOW 4 CLASSICISTS who have told me why they applied to do their subject...but of course they wouldn't let it get around the uni would they? And everybody cares about entrance statistics. You run the risk of sounding naive...
And you run the risk of making it sound like your whole point really is just a nasty case of sour grapes.

I'm not saying people don't look at entrance statistics but anyone who applies for a course without having any interest in the subject, just because they think it'll be easier to get into, is going to be in for a tought time so it'd be a pretty backwards thing to do. Maybe I am naive, but I know I didn't apply for my course because it's easier to get into than some.

Besides which, if everybody cares about entrance statistics that much, more people would apply for less competitive subjects.
0
meepmeep
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#27
Report 16 years ago
#27
(Original post by loopy2)
Not sour grapes just curious. 4 of the people I know who've got a place this year just happen to have one parent (their mum) who's a teacher. Also my neighbour who has got all her four children into Oxford over the last 6 years is also a teacher. And her kids definitely applied for undersubscribed no-hoper courses. Interested to hear ur views. Think about it.
Yes, I got an offer and yes both my parents are teachers. I applied for maths (not sure if that constitutes a no-hoper course, although could constitute a loner course ). But neither of my parents know much about applying to Oxbridge as they went to teacher training college (and my Dad did a part degree at the Open Uni).
0
Lurker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#28
Report 16 years ago
#28
(Original post by loopy2)
classics (one in 1.7 chance to get a place) and geography (one in 3)
Hmm, why pick on Geography anyway? Classics might have a particularly low ratio of applicants/places, but Geography's is higher than Languages, or Arch/Anth. It's also only slightly below numbers for English, Maths and Natural Sciences - or are these all no-hoper subjects too?
0
emzie
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#29
Report 16 years ago
#29
my mum is a teacher - but to 6/7year olds lol! and didnt help AT ALL with my ox appliction - she doesn't have a CLUE whatsoever LOLOL!!
0
emzie
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#30
Report 16 years ago
#30
n yer i'm the first person to go to uni from my close family (not inclusing aunties/uncles etc)
0
lala
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#31
Report 16 years ago
#31
(Original post by loopy2)
One thing I've noticed about classicists is that they are virtually all privately educated because I guess state schools don't do as much latin or Greek!! There seem to be an awful lot of classicists around now: any link between that and fact that state schools are getting a fairer crack or the whip?! Or do they really ALL adore their subject..I doubt it..
Shows what you know then doesnt it? Two good friends of mine who are classicists went to state school!
And how many Oxbridge classics students do you know anyway? You'd need to know quite a few to have an idea whether they typically adore their subject. What do you mean by 'a lot of classicists around now'? There are less places for this course then there used to be, did you not know that?
1
lala
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#32
Report 16 years ago
#32
(Original post by loopy2)
Because I KNOW 4 CLASSICISTS who have told me why they applied to do their subject...but of course they wouldn't let it get around the uni would they? And everybody cares about entrance statistics. You run the risk of sounding naive...
I know more classicists then that, none of whom your assertion fits. And no everyone doesnt care about entrance stats, or subjects like E&M wouldnt be so oversubscribed, and nobody would apply to those colleges seen as difficult to get into.
0
Kalypso
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#33
Report 16 years ago
#33
(Original post by lala)
I know, what a stupid thing to say. I dont know what you do, but one thing I've noticed with classicists in particular is that they all seem to be scarily into and amazing at their subjects. Which kind of undermines his point...
yup, I'm a classicist

(Original post by loopy2)
One thing I've noticed about classicists is that they are virtually all privately educated because I guess state schools don't do as much latin or Greek!! There seem to be an awful lot of classicists around now: any link between that and fact that state schools are getting a fairer crack or the whip?! Or do they really ALL adore their subject..I doubt it..
Well, not that it should have any influence on the credibilty of my degree, but I'm from an inner city mixed state comprehensive, average gcse pass rate less than 30%. I had never studied latin or greek before coming to Oxford. It's true that classics is one of the more private-school dominated subjects, but it is by no means exclusively so. As to more classicists; there is a bit of a revival in interest in the subject slowly taking place (and also initiatives to bring the subject back to state schools - check out the joint assoc. of classics teachers or the classical assoc. if you're interested :P)

I do adore my subject. It is fantastic, and, quite frankly, I just can't understand why not everyone wants to be a classicist :P

(Original post by loopy2)
Remember what Charles Clarke said about classics...
I do remember. But since I like to be fully informed on a subject instead of just name-dropping, I also know that his office was flooded with complaints afterwards, and that he consequently retracted his comments and apologised profusely.

(Original post by loopy2)
Because I KNOW 4 CLASSICISTS
Well congratulations, you've just found the world's weakest argument. 4 classicists...well, there are 600+ classicists in Oxford. That means you are making your judgement based on about 0.5% of students.
0
Kalypso
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#34
Report 16 years ago
#34
(Original post by lala)
Shows what you know then doesnt it? Two good friends of mine who are classicists went to state school!
Ooh, I wonder if I know them? The gap between real life and UKL seems to get smaller all the time! What college are you/your classicist friends at?
0
loopy2
Badges: 0
#35
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#35
(Original post by grey faerie)
Ooh, I wonder if I know them? The gap between real life and UKL seems to get smaller all the time! What college are you/your classicist friends at?

Can't tell you that I'm afraid. But 2 male and 2 female. All at very trad colleges...
0
Kalypso
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#36
Report 16 years ago
#36
(Original post by loopy2)
Can't tell you that I'm afraid. But 2 male and 2 female.
My question was directed at lala, not you, hence quoting her.

(Original post by loopy2)
All at very trad colleges...
What is the relevance of that?

FYI, I am also at a 'traditional' college.
0
androidkiller
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#37
Report 16 years ago
#37
I got in and I'm the first in my family to go to uni and my parents are not teachers.
0
tigerlily
Badges: 0
#38
Report 16 years ago
#38
(Original post by loopy2)
classics (one in 1.7 chance to get a place) and geography (one in 3)

I know this was said ages ago BUT..... You can't tell how easy it is to get on a course based purely on entrance statistics. As an example, you have like a 1 in 15 chance of getting into southampton to study medicine but a 1 in 3 chance of getting into Oxford. Does that mean that it is in fact easier to get into Oxford? You have to look at the people who apply not how many. By the way surely people value the subject they study more than the uni they get into! I mean I would go anywhere if it meant I could study the subject I wanted. But then no one in my family has ever gone to uni and there was no pressure to get into a 'good' university.
0
Jonatan
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#39
Report 16 years ago
#39
(Original post by loopy2)
Not sour grapes just curious. 4 of the people I know who've got a place this year just happen to have one parent (their mum) who's a teacher. Also my neighbour who has got all her four children into Oxford over the last 6 years is also a teacher. And her kids definitely applied for undersubscribed no-hoper courses. Interested to hear ur views. Think about it.
My dad is a scientist (Bio physics) and my mom is a doctor. I applied for Natural Sciences at Sindey Sussex
0
Alaric
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#40
Report 16 years ago
#40
Neither are teachers. One is a university lecturer and in university management (former admissions officer). Both did go to Oxford, however, they were both the first in their families to go. Obviously I have to be different and go to 'the other one'.

As to all this classics stuff, it's rubbish, classics is a very well respected degree and certainly used to (probably still is) be considered a path into the senior ranks of the civil service.


Alaric.
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Has your university offer been reduced?

Yes (7)
30.43%
No (14)
60.87%
Don't know (2)
8.7%

Watched Threads

View All