I have a degree in computing and can't even get a job as a help desk worker

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goodmen
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Sucks brah. Not even getting a reply to jobs that pay 13-14k a year, Uni was so worth it.
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Coda
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What did your degree cover? Are you a competent programmer?
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nojoegohome
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Yes i know its ****, IT jobs get about 150+ applicants for each job.

I have a part time job working on a helpdesk and i got lucky because i don't have a degree yet.
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alistair3408
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what was your result and from what uni? I've just graduated, got a postgrad offer and a job offer. A few other job offers and another possible internship. Imo CS is one of the best degrees for employability atm.
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billydisco
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The problem is half of you are going to crap universities, you dont do Computer Science, you do 'IT' which is no more than Microsoft Access.

If its easy to get onto these courses, then you're not really going to get much from them are you??? Why would an employer hire someone who just spent 3 years on an easy course??

This is why i think half of university courses need to be shut down! They're just a waste of time.
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rleungz
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Have you looked properly? They're 1000s of graduate training programmes for IT out there. If you're not getting the pass the application stage or interviews, have a look at your application or interview techniques.

Uni is worth it! It opens up so many doors, I've successfully got a industry placement year with Network Rail as a IT analyst... Took me 5 assessment centres and many application forms to get a placement and they're more harder to get than graduate jobs.
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mabandla2003
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I am getting paid 17K as an IT intern at Alstom Power. I just finished my second year at uni....so I'm working there for a year and coming back to uni to graduate.

I think IT is lucrative...for those who did the right degree at the right Uni and got the right experience (e.g. placements e.t.c)

Ofcourse if you do an IT degree at Derby university or something...you wil struggle to compete with even those who don't have degrees. It's the harsh truth of life. These days it's no longer just about going to Uni...it's about which uni, what program and most of all...what you got out of it.
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sunspoon
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(Original post by goodmen)
Sucks brah. Not even getting a reply to jobs that pay 13-14k a year, Uni was so worth it.
I'm sorry to hear that you're finding it hard to find a job after you graduated. As the above posters have already said, there are a lot of jobs going around which are lucrative but getting into them often depends on the course content, the university that you went to and the level of work experience you have.

A couple of my fellow Tech interns at an investment bank this summer read Computer Science at Hertfordshire for example, but both of them are excellent programmers in a variety of different languages, and one of them worked for Microsoft for 6 months in his gap year.

So it's not impossible to get a high paying job without attending a good university but you really need great work experience to get your nose in front of the candidates from universities like Oxford, Cambridge, UCL, Imperial, Warwick, Kings etc who arguably have a much easier time finding and securing high-paying internships and graduate jobs.
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nojoegohome
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You really need to do a range of things to get an IT job.

I have a part time job at an internet company

Im gaining Microsoft and other professional qualifications part time

And im doing my degree
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JBailey82
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(Original post by nojoegohome)
You really need to do a range of things to get an IT job.

I have a part time job at an internet company

Im gaining Microsoft and other professional qualifications part time

And im doing my degree
Hi nojoegohome have you had any experience with the ITIL and Prince2 courses? What Microsoft and degree courses have you completed, i'm just interested.

Thanks Jo
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rleungz
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Also, have you done any extra curricular activities? Joined sport clubs at university? Anything that makes you an interesting person?

It shows that you're a 'go getter' and not a dull person who sits in their room playing games all day.
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misterPaul
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People that play computer games are "dull" people, whereas people that do sports are somehow more interesting? I understand you're just voicing social consensus, but still, the way you've written it makes it sound like it's your opinion as well.

Not that I play games all day, I'm in a few sports societies.. I just don't consider myself better or more interesting than someone that isn't.
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welshwaynejack
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(Original post by billydisco)
The problem is half of you are going to crap universities, you dont do Computer Science, you do 'IT' which is no more than Microsoft Access.

If its easy to get onto these courses, then you're not really going to get much from them are you??? Why would an employer hire someone who just spent 3 years on an easy course??

This is why i think half of university courses need to be shut down! They're just a waste of time.
I completely disagree with this.....I’ve completed an applied computing course and covered a lot of IT specific skills such as programming in C#, Visual Basic, C...Databases such as SQL, Distributed Databases, Data mining...networking...prince2... ..etc...And for the record I only used Microsoft Access in college.....

It’s all good knowing about the theory but if you can’t apply it what’s the point??

If your struggling to get into IT then do some volunteer work and get some experience...if you want it enough sooner or later you will get in...
A masters might help you.....it might not....

If you have programming skills in C you should find it easy to land a graduate programmer scheme..theres plenty of them out there...Same with web design and networking...

I’ve just graduated with a 2.1 from a “non ranked in the times unis” university and know plenty of people who have landed jobs in big companies so the rep of university argument is complete bull...I myself are confident on landed a job once I’ve completed my masters in computer security...

For some more advice try http://www.insidecareers.co.uk/__802...f!opendatabase

Oh and certs ive been told are a waste of money and time unless your already in the IT industry and are looking to show you have reached the next level on the ladder....
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misterPaul
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What's with all the bigging up of Computer Science around here? I did Computer Systems Engineering and as far as I can compare, it seemed as good if not better than the equivalent modules in Computer Science.

Comp Sci isn't the only IT subject..

Also I agree with Welshwaynejack in regards to university reputation, as long as you identify how module content is relevant to the target role on your CV, you're just as likely to make it to interview. At interview, personal ability and technique becomes far more important than anything else.
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billydisco
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(Original post by welshwaynejack)
I completely disagree with this.....I’ve completed an applied computing course and covered a lot of IT specific skills such as programming in C#, Visual Basic, C...Databases such as SQL, Distributed Databases, Data mining...networking...prince2... ..etc...And for the record I only used Microsoft Access in college.....
whats your point? Mine is that you've been taught those, but how do i know you can actually pick up new material? People from top universities have a high IQ which allows them to be very flexible and pick up new concepts very fast.

(Original post by welshwaynejack)
It’s all good knowing about the theory but if you can’t apply it what’s the point??
Whats easier, installing microsoft access and following an online guide or creating customised algorithms? Its called supply and demand, the lower the supply (how many people can do a skill) the greater the demand (salary you can get). More people can teach themselves microsoft access than design efficient algorithms, thats why we get paid more.

(Original post by welshwaynejack)
If your struggling to get into IT then do some volunteer work and get some experience...if you want it enough sooner or later you will get in...
A masters might help you.....it might not....
Firstly i dont want to get into 'IT', i studied 'Computer Science', this is my point- there is a huge difference. One is very difficult and scientific, the other isnt. Secondly i have an amazing job thanks.


(Original post by welshwaynejack)
I’ve just graduated with a 2.1 from a “non ranked in the times unis” university and know plenty of people who have landed jobs in big companies so the rep of university argument is complete bull...I myself are confident on landed a job once I’ve completed my masters in computer security...
'Big companies' doesn't mean a thing, i could repair people's computers at microsoft. It's the salary which determines how good a job is, not the market value of the company!


Also, you went to 'university' and yet you don't know the difference between 'you're' and 'your'........ do you see my point? How could you be in a serious job when you dont know basic pre-GCSE English Language?
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billydisco
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(Original post by misterPaul)
What's with all the bigging up of Computer Science around here? I did Computer Systems Engineering and as far as I can compare, it seemed as good if not better than the equivalent modules in Computer Science.

Comp Sci isn't the only IT subject..

Also I agree with Welshwaynejack in regards to university reputation, as long as you identify how module content is relevant to the target role on your CV, you're just as likely to make it to interview. At interview, personal ability and technique becomes far more important than anything else.
Do we really care about the exact degree title? There's a difference between an 'IT' degree and a 'Computer Science' degree. From what you've said it'd appear you did Computer Science material.
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misterPaul
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(Original post by billydisco)
People from top universities have a high IQ
My ego detector has just exploded. First, high IQ doesn't always translate into a good employee. Second, people from top universities don't always have high IQ's. Third and for bonus points, "Top" universities aren't always the best. Check out University of Surrey for Electronic Engineering. Number 2 last time I checked, but with very low entry requirements, and otherwise considered mediocre.

It's sad to see people still trying to push this elitist agenda. Though I guess you would, as I can infer you've attended one such "top" university.

(Original post by billydisco)
Also, you went to 'university' and yet you don't know the difference between 'you're' and 'your'........ do you see my point?
Now you're sounding like a troll. Since when has grammar been a prerequisite of anything Computing related? I didn't attend a single grammar module. Did you? Beyond this, some people have difficulties grasping language, but excel in other areas. You sound like a pedantic ass.

(Original post by billydisco)
Do we really care about the exact degree title? There's a difference between an 'IT' degree and a 'Computer Science' degree. From what you've said it'd appear you did Computer Science material.
Seeing as I didn't share a single module with the Comp Sci students, yes it's a completely different course, one of many alternatives.

Whats easier, installing microsoft access and following an online guide or creating customised algorithms? Its called supply and demand, the lower the supply (how many people can do a skill) the greater the demand (salary you can get). More people can teach themselves microsoft access than design efficient algorithms, thats why we get paid more.
You've gone out of your way to insult MS Access specialists, and also pushed the agenda that salary is the most important gauge of how good a job is. Lets put these two assertions together and see what MS Access specialists earn?

http://www.itjobswatch.co.uk/jobs/uk/ms%20access.do

Average salary : £32,500
10% of jobs offered a salary of more than : £55,000

Your hatred of any IT profession but your own only narrowly disguises the bigotry that seems deeply ingrained in your person. I hope I am never placed in a job role where I would have to work with you.
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unknownFluency
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(Original post by misterPaul)

http://www.itjobswatch.co.uk/jobs/uk/ms%20access.do

Average salary : £32,500
10% of jobs offered a salary of more than : £55,000

Your hatred of any IT profession but your own only narrowly disguises the bigotry that seems deeply ingrained in your person. I hope I am never placed in a job role where I would have to work with you.
LOL. I have to agree....
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billydisco
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(Original post by misterPaul)
I hope I am never placed in a job role where I would have to work with you.
Trust me, you won't. I dont intend on answering people's Windows XP problems because i did a degree in 'IT'.....
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billydisco
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(Original post by misterPaul)
First, high IQ doesn't always translate into a good employee.
I never said it did, but (in the REAL computing world), where we don't sit around messing about with M. Powerpoint the best experts are VERY technical. It's what they're employed for.

(Original post by misterPaul)
Second, people from top universities don't always have high IQ's.
Back to reality...... yes they usually do.

(Original post by misterPaul)
Third and for bonus points, "Top" universities aren't always the best. Check out University of Surrey for Electronic Engineering. Number 2 last time I checked, but with very low entry requirements, and otherwise considered mediocre.
and last year Luton was amazing for maths..... except they didn't teach maths. Employers determine prestige, not league tables.

(Original post by misterPaul)
It's sad to see people still trying to push this elitist agenda. Though I guess you would, as I can infer you've attended one such "top" university.
No it's sad people thinking they can spend 3 years playing with Microsoft Office, get a 'degree' and then start applying to IBM and all the investment banks thinking they have a chance.



(Original post by misterPaul)
Now you're sounding like a troll. Since when has grammar been a prerequisite of anything Computing related? I didn't attend a single grammar module. Did you? Beyond this, some people have difficulties grasping language, but excel in other areas. You sound like a pedantic ass.
How can someone have a qualification as high as a degree, yet can't even grasp basic english? You say IQ doesn't make a good employee- what are you proposing, a low IQ person who can't even compensate themselves with good spelling?



(Original post by misterPaul)
Seeing as I didn't share a single module with the Comp Sci students, yes it's a completely different course, one of many alternatives.
Was your course mathematical? It was engineering- so yes. My point is non-mathematical "anyone can do this" degrees are completely pointless. How can you be qualified in something anyone could do?



(Original post by misterPaul)
You've gone out of your way to insult MS Access specialists, and also pushed the agenda that salary is the most important gauge of how good a job is. Lets put these two assertions together and see what MS Access specialists earn?


Average salary : £32,500
So that's the average 'Access' salary for 21-65yr olds.....

Imperial's average salary for 22yr olds graduating is 35k..... so basically all the [rough maths] ((65-21)/2 + 21) = 43 year old access 'specialists' are averaging 32,500 yet all the 22yr old Imperial grads are averaging 35k....

Life is about supply and demand
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