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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    Well here I was actually referring to kellywood's problem not the original problem about textbooks - and out of interest how was that hypocritical?
    because ace, I presume you have never been to a state school? and it is hypocritical because you have never experienced this - the texts are always there for you when you need the resources, whilst in a state school we must do with what we have for the mean time and wait for books to arrive xoxo
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    We had to self-teach half our A-level Physics course. In AS-level, this guy Mr Francesco DaCosta claiming to have a degree from Oxford/Cambridge and being a member of ESSA taught us half the first module, he was so rubbish however I luckily got a high B in it . We got rid of him and our other decent teacher till the end of AS. In A2 we had this Indian teacher with a degree in maths teaching us physics, so half of module 4 (OCR A - forces, fields and energy) was a DIY job. Our optional module of nuclear and particle physics, which was very interesting but again we had to teach ourselves nuclear fission, fusion and decay (1st half of the book, until the particle physics) and synoptic we did ourselves anyway but our other decent teacher did it with us and was very good especially past papers and the practical bit.

    The same with Chemistry, our male teacher was a "newbie", masters in ICT and a degree in Chemistry. Well again a DIY job especially Gases, Liquids and Solids optional topic. Oh, all the modules where split/shared between our 2 teachers but we only had a problem with this one. During the OFSTED inspectors visit they were observing our lesson and we were doing ligand substitution experiments but we didn’t understand the theory of it. Lucky, someone else read the book so when the OFSTED guy asked us questions he answered them while the rest of us sighed with relief. Our chemistry dept got a good recommendation in the later report !

    Btw, I go to a state school, Wilnecote High!
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    (Original post by tammy_girl)
    because ace, I presume you have never been to a state school? and it is hypocritical because you have never experienced this - the texts are always there for you when you need the resources, whilst in a state school we must do with what we have for the mean time and wait for books to arrive xoxo
    Well she laid out the facts about the problem she had in her state school, a problem which I'm almost certain most public schools will ever have. It wasn't anything to do with texts being there when she needed them. It was the fact that she signed up to do History and Sociology but was forced to miss some classes of each because of the bad timetabling. Did you used to go to a public school? If not, how can you make statements about it like 'the texts are always there for you when you need the resources' - I would agree, but it seems you would regard this as hypocrisy?
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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    And this is testament as to why the state system should be avoided like the plague. This is training for life? Come on...
    Well, mine is one of the worst cases. Most Year 13s don't have any clashes at all, I was just unlukcy. And in a way, it is training for life, or more specifically for univeristy, because I'll have to organise my time and do a lot of independent work to make up for it.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    Well, mine is one of the worst cases. Most Year 13s don't have any clashes at all, I was just unlukcy. And in a way, it is training for life, or more specifically for univeristy, because I'll have to organise my time and do a lot of independent work to make up for it.
    It's training for life because.... the university you're going to is going to get your lectures and tutorials clashing with other subjects so you won't be able to have lessons in the subject you've chosen to study? Or because when you start working you will be forced to miss certain days of the week because of a timetable clash and your pay will be docked? Bad organization on the part of your state school is not training for life.
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    I go to a grammar (still a state) and we're not that badly organised.

    Out of aroung 400 people, 40 had to go and change their timetables. We're given the exam board text books (or at least have access to them in class). But one of my teachers is yet to appear (she sent a note saying she'd leave work and then didn't) and everything is slightly random. Its all good though.
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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    Well she laid out the facts about the problem she had in her state school, a problem which I'm almost certain most public schools will ever have. It wasn't anything to do with texts being there when she needed them. It was the fact that she signed up to do History and Sociology but was forced to miss some classes of each because of the bad timetabling. Did you used to go to a public school? If not, how can you make statements about it like 'the texts are always there for you when you need the resources' - I would agree, but it seems you would regard this as hypocrisy?
    I did go to a public school for a while but I was forced to leave because in that particular school if you were not a doctors child or a lawyers child they didn't want to know you if you hadn't got money to throw about so I didn't go to school because of the constant pressure and remarks made. Thats besides the point!
    but of course there is going to be clashes in timetables in a state school because they do not have enough teachers to teach each subject without them all clashing with their timetables. Usually teachers, teach a variety of subjects in a state school e.g. my sociology teacher is also an english teacher and my business studies teacher from last year is also an RE, accounts, ICT and English teacher. Thats why there are so many clashes.

    My interpretation of hypocrisy is when you slate something and you have never had the chance of experiencing it yourself, you Ace may have a different conclusion of the word 'hypocrisy' but that is my own. xoxo
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    (Original post by sayed_samed)
    We had to self-teach half our A-level Physics course. In AS-level, this guy Mr Francesco DaCosta claiming to have a degree from Oxford/Cambridge and being a member of ESSA taught us half the first module, he was so rubbish however I luckily got a high B in it . We got rid of him and our other decent teacher till the end of AS. In A2 we had this Indian teacher with a degree in maths teaching us physics, so half of module 4 (OCR A - forces, fields and energy) was a DIY job. Our optional module of nuclear and particle physics, which was very interesting but again we had to teach ourselves nuclear fission, fusion and decay (1st half of the book, until the particle physics) and synoptic we did ourselves anyway but our other decent teacher did it with us and was very good especially past papers and the practical bit.

    The same with Chemistry, our male teacher was a "newbie", masters in ICT and a degree in Chemistry. Well again a DIY job especially Gases, Liquids and Solids optional topic. Oh, all the modules where split/shared between our 2 teachers but we only had a problem with this one. During the OFSTED inspectors visit they were observing our lesson and we were doing ligand substitution experiments but we didn’t understand the theory of it. Lucky, someone else read the book so when the OFSTED guy asked us questions he answered them while the rest of us sighed with relief. Our chemistry dept got a good recommendation in the later report !

    Btw, I go to a state school, Wilnecote High!


    Hey i know how you feel. I used to go to Rawlett, most of my GCSES were self taught. Luckily i've moved from there for A level now.
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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    It's training for life because.... the university you're going to is going to get your lectures and tutorials clashing with other subjects so you won't be able to have lessons in the subject you've chosen to study? Or because when you start working you will be forced to miss certain days of the week because of a timetable clash and your pay will be docked? Bad organization on the part of your state school is not training for life.
    You're ingoring the point I made, which was that my timetable clash is forcing me to do even more independent work than I would otherwise. Independent work is the key to success at univeristy, so doing lots of it now and having to overcome problems to get good grades rather than having it easy will help me later on.
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    Hey abbie_rw, a fellow tamworthian! Chav central now mate. I used to go to Wilnecote High School, i think its better than the drug dealer havens of QEMS and rawlett.
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    (Original post by sayed_samed)
    Hey abbie_rw, a fellow tamworthian! Chav central now mate. I used to go to Wilnecote High School, i think its better than the drug dealer havens of QEMS and rawlett.
    That pretty much sums tamworth up. Rawlett was ok, i got lucky with some teachers. Not sure about Qems, they did well in GCSES this year.
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    I'm in a private school and I haven't got and am not going to get a history textbook...and our teacher has gone on holiday for 2 weeks without leaving any work. Not to mention the fact that our extremely talented history teacher from last year was fired without any reason.
    So you're doing well in comparison and at least you're not paying for it.
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    I dont know why your so shocked about textbooks. Ive got two textbooks out of four. One of them is maths where weve got a specifically edexcel textbook yet we are doing the OCR course! Also all my rooms area ll wierd, either two small, a special needs room and i even have geography in an art room with no whiteboard.
    But im sure it will all get sorted out and you just got to get on with it.
    But as for complainig about free lessons WHAT?? I love mine, even though it is only in the past three days that i have started to enjoy them properly, having spent last thurs, fri and monday morning glued to the cricket on tele. They are great and they do give you a chance to do your work and just chill out a bit.
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    (Original post by Skylark)
    I've been at a private school until now, I've gone to the local state 6th form. I went in expecting to be given my textbooks and a prompt start to lessons. Instead my Biology teacher said "order your own" without even asking if we were going to. And my History teacher said "they'll be along in a few weeks". Well I've got a totally free afternoon now, I've been set no work and I can't believe I'm sitting a module in January in both these subjects and I won't be getting the textbooks for a few weeks! Is anyone else shocked by this?
    It's called initiative.
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    Well anyway I've moved back to my private school now, where I'm very happy, very organised and am hopefully on track for good grades. There are both advantages and disadvantages to both systems of education, my private just suits me better

    Thanks for all the replies!
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    Mistakes that were made in by my old school:

    * They put me in bottom set for Maths after I got an A in a mock exam (actually I appeared on everyone's register but bottom set appeared on my timetable)
    * 6 months after they said they would sort that problem out (I was back in top set lessons so wasn't worried), they decided which teir everyone should be entered for. Guess who decided my teir? Yep Set 6 teacher who entered everyone for foundation. Thankfully, they appeared to have had spare highers
    * And guess who wrote the teacher report in my Record of Acheivment? Yes, Mr Set 6 teacher again! Having only been to one of his lessons, he had no option other than to leave it blank
    * My ICT teacher lost my coursework (counted for 33% of the final mark) and then didn't tell me to print another copy so I got 0 hence me getting a D overall
    * They decided not to tell us that they had the GCSE certificates and when I asked about them they told me they threw them away. Now apparantly they might not have done and the person at reception told me today that she would send a note to the Exams dude to ask and he would then phone me.

    And they asked me why I went to college instead of their sixth form :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by rachelrainbow32)
    Also all my rooms area ll wierd, either two small, a special needs room and i even have geography in an art room with no whiteboard.
    Hehe, sounds familiar! My school decided to get rid of the library and they're in the process of bulding a new sixth form centre, so in the meantime we're stuck with one small common room between over 200 of us which is always really nosiy, so it's impossible to get any work done, and ICT facilities shared with the Year 9s-11s where again it's noisy and impossible to concentrate and teachers can kick us out because obviously their childrens' Internet games are far more important than our A2 coursework :rolleyes: Not to mention the fact that even when lessons have been timetabled correctly, they haven't usually been allocated a room, so we have to waste valuable time hunting for one.
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    I had assumed most schools had non-clashing timetables and textbooks...My school is pretty good.
 
 
 

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