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Tina
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#21
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#21
and to everyone on here whos come up with the history of the origin of cantab etc etc ur all smart people unlike me!
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Radagasty
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#22
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#22
(Original post by leeshen-han)
Weli if I'm not mistaken, Cantab. stands for Cantabridgiensis.
As for Oxon., it stands for Oxoniensis.
Both are latin words.
Since we're being pedantic about spelling, it's actually Cantabrigiensis.

Note that both OXONIENSIS and CANTABRIGIENSIS are adjectives (in the nominative case, not genitive, as some assume). The corresponding nouns, i.e., the names of the towns themselves, are OXONIA and CANTABRIGIA. These all originated in Mediaeval Latin, of course, and are unattested in classical sources.
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hornblower
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#23
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#23
(Original post by leeshen-han)
Weli if I'm not mistaken, Cantab. stands for Cantabridgiensis.
As for Oxon., it stands for Oxoniensis.
Both are latin words.
Well, actually - Cantab is a shortening for Cantabrigian.

The only other UK graduates entitled to name the institution after their names are Durham graduates - they can write Dunhelm.

J.
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Radagasty
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#24
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#24
(Original post by hornblower)
Well, actually - Cantab is a shortening for Cantabrigian.

The only other UK graduates entitled to name the institution after their names are Durham graduates - they can write Dunhelm.
You are right insofar as Cantab is short for Cantabrigian, which is in any case the English equivalent of Cantabrigiensis, in jocular usage.

However, were talking about Oxon and Cantab in the context of degrees, in which case they are definitely abbreviations of the Latin terms. BA Cantab. = Baccalaureus Artium Cantabrigiensis. The name of the degree is Latin, likewise the name of the institution.

Dunhelm (more usually Dunelm) is short for Dunelmensis, Latin for 'of Durham'.
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J.S.
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#25
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#25
(Original post by hornblower)
Well, actually - Cantab is a shortening for Cantabrigian.

The only other UK graduates entitled to name the institution after their names are Durham graduates - they can write Dunhelm.

J.

If you look at a univ website, almost everybody names their university after the letters, particularly if they're proud of it!
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hornblower
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#26
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#26
(Original post by Radagasty)
BA Cantab. = Baccalaureus Artium Cantabrigiensis. The name of the degree is Latin, likewise the name of the institution..
Isn't it artibus, not artium?

J.
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hornblower
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#27
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#27
(Original post by J.S.)
If you look at a univ website, almost everybody names their university after the letters, particularly if they're proud of it!
That may be so, but they are not legally entitled to do this.

Only Oxford, Cambridge and Durham alumni are allowed to name the institution.

J.
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Helenia
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#28
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#28
(Original post by hornblower)
Isn't it artibus, not artium?

J.
What's the genitive plural of ars? I can't remember.
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~U~Teedy~U~
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#29
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#29
(Original post by hornblower)
That may be so, but they are not legally entitled to do this.

Only Oxford, Cambridge and Durham alumni are allowed to name the institution.

J.

Hmmm I thought you could also get BA (Open)?
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Radagasty
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#30
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#30
(Original post by Helenia)
What's the genitive plural of ars? I can't remember.
The genitive plural is ARTIUM... ARS, -TIS is a third declension noun with a stem in -I, like MONS, -TIS and URBS, -IS.

Are you a classicist, Helenia?
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Helenia
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Radagasty)
The genitive plural is ARTIUM... ARS, -TIS is a third declension noun with a stem in -I, like MONS, -TIS and URBS, -IS.

Are you a classicist, Helenia?
Hell no! I'm a medic. I did Latin GCSE a long time ago, that's all. The grammar of it is kind of useful in anatomy (e.g. knowing why one muscle is flexor digitorum and another one is flexor digiti minimi thanks to the endings!)
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Kalypso
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#32
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#32
(Original post by Helenia)
Hell no!
there's nowt wrong with being a classicist...
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Helenia
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#33
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#33
(Original post by grey faerie)
there's nowt wrong with being a classicist...
Not at all. But I was scared by the fact he might think I knew something about classics, when really my repertoire is along the lines of "Matella est in culina."
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Kalypso
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Helenia)
Not at all. But I was scared by the fact he might think I knew something about classics, when really my repertoire is along the lines of "Matella est in culina."
hehe, it was just j/k anyway

lol, is taht the cambridge latin course? What a legend. Metella does nothing but 'sedet' for about 3 chapters, and then moves into the kitchen.

*sarcasm*Can't think why people might get the idea that classics is a old boys type subject :rolleyes: *furiously starts scribbling a revolutionary feminist latin text book*
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Helenia
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#35
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(Original post by grey faerie)
lol, is taht the cambridge latin course? What a legend. Metella does nothing but 'sedet' for about 3 chapters, and then moves into the kitchen.
Hehehe, but doesn't the dog jump on the table at some point? ("Mendax!" exclamavit Grumio!) That was exciting :rolleyes:

Everyone does the Cambridge Latin course - it's fab! My cousin is working for them at the moment - they're putting it on the internet so kids can learn Latin online. Rock on.
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Tek2
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#36
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#36
I am the only one who doesnt have a clue what anyones on about? I feel very thick.
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hornblower
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#37
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(Original post by Tek2)
I am the only one who doesnt have a clue what anyones on about? I feel very thick.
Basically, a graduate from Oxford, Cambridge or Durham is entitled to some extra letters after his name. For example:

Mr Joe Bloggs BA Hons (Oxon)
Mr John Doe BSc Hons (Cantab)
Mr David Beckham MA Hons (Dunhelm)

The Hons part is sometimes subscripted or even omitted.

J.
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Helenia
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#38
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#38
(Original post by hornblower)
Basically, a graduate from Oxford, Cambridge or Durham is entitled to some extra letters after his name. For example:

Mr Joe Bloggs BA Hons (Oxon)
Mr John Doe BSc Hons (Cantab)
Mr David Beckham MA Hons (Dunhelm)

The Hons part is sometimes subscripted or even omitted.

J.
I don't think you can get a BSc from Cambridge, can you? Even the NatScis graduate with BAs.
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hitchhiker_13
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#39
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#39
If you look at maps of Britain, areas in Oxford come with Oxon, but in Cambridge it's Cam, not Cantab, presumably so you don't get it mixed up with Canterbury.
What a useless piece of information...
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hitchhiker_13
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#40
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#40
(Original post by Helenia)
I don't think you can get a BSc from Cambridge, can you? Even the NatScis graduate with BAs.

Think you might be right, not sure.
Feeling you get MSci but not BSci? Could be completely wrong.
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