University is for the elite.. Watch

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Tom H
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#21
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#21
University is for people with the capacity and willingness to learn.

If you just got a D or something and want to learn about the media, why shouldn't you be allowed on a course designed for people with lower abilities but who still want to learn?
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Remmy
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#22
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#22
is media a course 'designed for people with lower abilities' ?
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pinkypants
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#23
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#23
I think one of the major problems Tony Blair and his emphasis on 'education' has created is the blurring of the lines beteen higher education and further education.
Fair enough, if people with lower capabilites want to learn, they can do so, but what's happening now is that those people are also getting degrees out of it and discrediting the other more prestigious, difficult degrees.
The more people go to University, the less any sort of achievement from most Univerisites will stand for. If Blair has his way soon a degree from a non Russell Group, for example, will mean about as much as five GCSE's, and people will have to spend more time and money trying to get more set up and qualified for a good career.
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TKR
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#24
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#24
university for the lite my arse - people can waste £12,000 and three years of their life on the back of about 2 'E's at A-level... including general studies
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Tyler Durden
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Remmy)
is media a course 'designed for people with lower abilities' ?
Not necessarily. The fact of the matter though is that the people who took Media Studies at my school were not the ones getting top grades. I doubt media is "designed" for people with "lower abilities", rather it attacts people with different strengths than outright academic ability. Creativity is not to be sniffed at and neither is a knowledge of the workings of the media. Having said that, the truth is that the top jobs in the media are still likely to be taken by those who have studied a more academically rigorous subject. Skills are transferable, someone doing a History degree will probably pick up the necessary analytical skills in a more challenging context than someone doing Media. Again though, this doesn't mean that someone who has taken a "proper" degree is going to walk into a top job and that someone who has taken a slightly less prestigious degree is not going to be successful. Like I said before, in the job market charisma and the ability to relate well to people is important. There is also though often a necessity to analyse a tricky situation and someone whose degree is History, Classics, English, Philosophy, etc might have the edge there. At the end of the day there are more important factors in determining whether someone will be successful in their endeavors than the name of their university and the subject they studied.
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Fusion
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#26
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(Original post by TKR)
university for the lite my arse - people can waste £12,000 and three years of their life on the back of about 2 'E's at A-level... including general studies
how sad
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kalibantre
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#27
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#27
I got BCD in my A levels, I' bright. Are you telling me I dont deserve Uni? That I didn't work hard enough. Just cause there are no pretty little A's in my grade sheet.

I worked damn hard for this, as do most people that go to Uni. I think it's great its being offered to everyone, they should have the chance to learn more if thats what they want. True apprenticeships can lead to more money but the right to learn should be given not earned.

If you don't work hard in University then you'll soon know about it cause you won't be there much longer.
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Champagne Breakfast
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#28
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#28
(Original post by olliemccowan)
I blame the Government for their "we want 50% of the population to be university educated" proposal
Me too

Although I thought it was 100% for a while.. oops
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JohnStuartMill
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#29
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#29
(Original post by shady lane)
I was at Oxford for 6 months and with the exception of the few students who worked in the Magdalen bar there was almost no employment.
Oxford and Cambridge don't allow you to work during term time but as they have such short terms students can generally get a part time job for the rest of the year.
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Lord Waddell
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#30
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I think that certainly the number of degrees should be cut. I mean, what on earth do you want gender studies for? University in my opinion should really be for the people doing medicine, law, economics, certain Arts courses - History, classics, languages, philosophy etc - Divinity and teaching, not useless 'Mickey Mouse' degrees. I think that the government's 50% target is at least partly to blame.
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Jazzy
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#31
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#31
firstly: some of the ppl saying that D graders shouldn't go to uni are I think are probably the same who say that exams aren't a full measure of academic ability!

2ly:


(Original post by killerbee)
ollie - i agree 100%

...................make it a 97% aggree
:ditto:
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ThePenguinMafia
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#32
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#32
Elite in what way? You can get into uni with rubbish grades and little money. I'd say that Oxbridge is purely for the elite, but that's not really true for such places as Thames valley. It really depends on which university.
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ThePenguinMafia
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#33
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#33
(Original post by Jazzy)
firstly: some of the ppl saying that D graders shouldn't go to uni are I think are probably the same who say that exams aren't a full measure of academic ability!
Gosh no! saying such things would in no way boost my ego, and so I'm quite happy to accept A's as being the pinnacle of intellectual achievement, regardless of truth, up to the point where I get something better.
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foxo
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#34
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(Original post by englishstudent)
People who are not especially academic are not destined to be failures - look at the likes of Bill Gates.
Erm, Bill Gates got into Harvard (granted, he did drop out).

I don't really believe universities are for the "elite" nowadays. Anyone can get A's in school, and anyone can cram their life full of extra-curricular activities.
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saz_1989
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#35
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#35
Attitudes should change towards higher education and make it more elite. Morons who can't achieve at least Cs at A level should not be allowed to waste more tax payers money by going to an institute such as Edge Hill to spend three years doing a watered down version of a degree. All at the expense of people who worked hard at good universities.
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saz_1989
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#36
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#36
(Original post by shady lane)
At the equivalent universities in the UK (Oxbridge, LSE, UCL, etc.) barely anyone works! I was at Oxford for 6 months and with the exception of the few students who worked in the Magdalen bar there was almost no employment.
That's because you're supposed to be studying for the short term (only eight weeks) that you are there. Having a job detracts from your academic work. Please also note that UK degrees are more condensed than US degrees; here it takes seven years to get a PhD, in the US it takes nine, and hence we have to work harder during our degree. There is also a 13 week long summer vac where you can get a fabulously well-paid internship thanks to your Oxbridge status and make more money than anyone with a part time job during term at another uni.
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userunknown
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#37
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#37
Degrees for the elite? don't be funny , Just smacks of Academic arrogance, by not very authorative people in their chosen subjects, professional awards : recognised, handed out by standard bodies, i.e Turing Awards, Nobel Prizes, Knighting for Academic related work, are for the elite, a degree is well ermm a degree.
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frost105
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#38
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#38
If anything the current targets will force graduates to become more competitive in the job market.
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shady lane
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#39
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(Original post by Lauren)
That's because you're supposed to be studying for the short term (only eight weeks) that you are there. Having a job detracts from your academic work. Please also note that UK degrees are more condensed than US degrees; here it takes seven years to get a PhD, in the US it takes nine, and hence we have to work harder during our degree. There is also a 13 week long summer vac where you can get a fabulously well-paid internship thanks to your Oxbridge status and make more money than anyone with a part time job during term at another uni.
So Stanford students don't get fabulous well paid internships? Have you ever been to the US?

It's an elite attitude that someone who is studying shouldn't be working, because many people cannot afford to sacrifice working for uni due to family circumstances. I am surprised you can't see some people have financial need.
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andy5788
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#40
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All you people blaiming the New Labour "50% brigade" forget 30 years ago you could get into Polytechnics with a couple of E's...
You'd struggle to get onto the most "mickey mouse" course at the worst uni with those grades now.....
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