How to get good grades in Year 10?

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ArtisticFlair
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#1
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#1
I'm doing 12 GCSEs, commencing in Year 10, and I want to know how much extra work I should do to get all A*s? Furthermore, how long before a modular exam should I revise (ie, for a Chemistry module in January, or RS Unit exam in June?)


Thanks guys!
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GottaLovePhysics! :)
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#2
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#2
Buy textbook/workbook
Work through.
Take practise paper.
Did you get 100% correct?
No; Revise more
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10010001101001
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#3
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#3
Keep your mind off women for at least half of your school hours.
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Luhar
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#4
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#4
revise?
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im so academic
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#5
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#5
(Original post by ArtisticFlair)
I'm doing 12 GCSEs, commencing in Year 10, and I want to know how much extra work I should do to get all A*s? Furthermore, how long before a modular exam should I revise (ie, for a Chemistry module in January, or RS Unit exam in June?)


Thanks guys!
If you understand it all, not much if any tbh.

Revision for RE - the a day or two before.
Science modules - don't make the mistake of doing it weeks before the exam. A day or before should be sufficient.

Tbh a day or two should be fine for pretty much all subjects.
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Extricated
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#6
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#6
Year 10 is sooooooooooo easy, i've just completed year 10 and all the science papers are multiple choice. I took GCSE maths early, statistics early, Biology1a, Biology1b, Chem1a, Chem1b, Physics1a,Physics1b and achieved A*A*A*A*A*A* in the sciences, and am awaiting the results of the maths and stats, Im not boasting or anything, but GCSE science is piss, as is GCSE maths, just revise from the textbook for science, and you should get A*s
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draikzer
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#7
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#7
Get on your knees and work for that grade.

(BLOWTHETEACHER.)
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ThatWillDoYou
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#8
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#8
All A*s.... Unneccesary.
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TheFootyKing19
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#9
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#9
^ Agreed...
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partypool
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#10
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#10
(Original post by ArtisticFlair)
I'm doing 12 GCSEs, commencing in Year 10, and I want to know how much extra work I should do to get all A*s? Furthermore, how long before a modular exam should I revise (ie, for a Chemistry module in January, or RS Unit exam in June?)


Thanks guys!
I have just finished year 10, so I will can give you a realistic idea...please can you tell me which subjects you are doing (and which exam boards if possible)
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madders94
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#11
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#11
Don't bother, you don't need 12A*s, you may get them but you'll turn into a ugly recluse :p:
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chinaberry
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#12
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#12
(Original post by im so academic)
Science modules - don't make the mistake of doing it weeks before the exam. A day or before should be sufficient.
That's silly, though, you need to consolidate the knowledge, which means doing it over and over. The most-likely-to-succeed person in our year (and the most self satisfied, pleased with himself, least humble etc) said that he revised about an hour every night from December for June exams. And he really is clever, he's not just learning by rote. You've got to be humble and knuckle down and do really boring work because there is so much to 'understand'- even if it is all basic stuff, it's 10+ subjects' worth of basic stuff. It's like scales in music, you think you know the notes, but when you actually play it it goes haywire because you haven't bothered to practise the fingering.

Personally I allocated a subject to each day and instead of setting a time limit, I set a number of pages so that I'd have finished the textbook by May. For example, when it said History on a certain day, I'd do five pages and I went through the textbook twice and it took me about 45 minutes each time. It really works, especially if you're the type of person who needs a specific plan of what to do.
You'll know whether you're a visual learner or not. You'll also know whether you're a 'word' person or a 'number' person- which one automatically sticks in your mind and which one doesn't. I just made page of notes after page of notes, by the end I had a small forest to recycle, but it worked. Also, writing is better than typing because it takes longer, so you have to remember the fact for longer while you're writing it. In history, make a timeline as you go along. Not to revise from, but in the exam you can picture the timeline in your mind and see which goes where. Maths, it's really worth getting yourself a maths tutor if there's a few gray areas you need cleared up, otherwise the CGP revision guide will become your new best friend for the next few months.
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im so academic
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#13
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#13
(Original post by chinaberry)
That's silly, though, you need to consolidate the knowledge, which means doing it over and over. The most-likely-to-succeed person in our year (and the most self satisfied, pleased with himself, least humble etc) said that he revised about an hour every night from December for June exams. And he really is clever, he's not just learning by rote. You've got to be humble and knuckle down and do really boring work because there is so much to 'understand'- even if it is all basic stuff, it's 10+ subjects' worth of basic stuff. It's like scales in music, you think you know the notes, but when you actually play it it goes haywire because you haven't bothered to practise the fingering.

Personally I allocated a subject to each day and instead of setting a time limit, I set a number of pages so that I'd have finished the textbook by May. For example, when it said History on a certain day, I'd do five pages and I went through the textbook twice and it took me about 45 minutes each time. It really works, especially if you're the type of person who needs a specific plan of what to do.
You'll know whether you're a visual learner or not. You'll also know whether you're a 'word' person or a 'number' person- which one automatically sticks in your mind and which one doesn't. I just made page of notes after page of notes, by the end I had a small forest to recycle, but it worked. Also, writing is better than typing because it takes longer, so you have to remember the fact for longer while you're writing it. In history, make a timeline as you go along. Not to revise from, but in the exam you can picture the timeline in your mind and see which goes where. Maths, it's really worth getting yourself a maths tutor if there's a few gray areas you need cleared up, otherwise the CGP revision guide will become your new best friend for the next few months.
Well for some people, they need the revision, but from my experience - it's not really needed for me, so I guess it depends on the person.

The thing is, if you understand the concepts - why do you need to revise? After all, you know it.

Understanding = long term memory (hence no need for revision).

Revision = short term memory (hence why the boy you mentioned revised from December to June - it was in his short term memory).
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chinaberry
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#14
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#14
Well, that's untrue.
Do you know what the word understanding means? It's not a case of understanding. Of course everyone understands it. You need practise in using it and it needs to be in your long term memory. Obviously revision puts it into your long term memory. Don't mess around with terms you don't understand. Plus, for me personally, revision was often the first time I'd come across the material, because I did f'''k all in upper school, so if I wanted to get above my predicted grades I had to revise.
If you can just hear something once and remember all its details and particulars and reproduce it word for word in the exam (that's what you're saying)- great- but then you'd have been skipped a couple of years long ago (were you?) and you'll get like 12 top candidate awards because you'll have given them the textbook, and also I'd have thought that you were long used to your genius and wouldn't need to brag about it so much.
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im so academic
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#15
Report 11 years ago
#15
(Original post by chinaberry)
Well, that's untrue.
Do you know what the word understanding means? It's not a case of understanding. Of course everyone understands it. You need practise in using it and it needs to be in your long term memory. Obviously revision puts it into your long term memory. Don't mess around with terms you don't understand. Plus, for me personally, revision was often the first time I'd come across the material, because I did f'''k all in upper school, so if I wanted to get above my predicted grades I had to revise.
If you can just hear something once and remember all its details and particulars and reproduce it word for word in the exam (that's what you're saying)- great- but then you'd have been skipped a couple of years long ago (were you?) and you'll get like 12 top candidate awards because you'll have given them the textbook, and also I'd have thought that you were long used to your genius and wouldn't need to brag about it so much.
I'm the one messing around with terms you don't understand?

Here's an English lesson for you - "revision", if you revise, you (literally) look at something again (hence the prefix re-), however we use this term as a way of going over material a second time, which is more or less what the literal definition is.

So for you to actually say that "revision was often the first time..." highlights your hypocrisy.

Anyways, yes I do know what understanding means - and yes, it is a case of understanding. Look honey, you can revise all you want, but if you do not understand it - or even the question, then you won't get the marks.

No, you do not *necessarily* need practice (you use "s" as a verb, "c" as a noun) using it, especially for a majority of subjects. If you understand a certain concept - you will remember, and for you to suggest that revision puts it in your long term memory is simply untrue.

This is because people revise days, weeks before the exam. After that, do they remember everything they revised? No, they haven't.

But if you understand something, you will remember forever. Can't you understand? Revision only aides in understanding, but it is not necessarily a requirement.

Also, for you to tell me this and you did "**** all in upper school" suggests that you don't really know what you are saying, do you?

I know from my experience that if I understand something, I will remember. You only think that revision puts it into your long term memory because as soon as you revised, you finally understood it. Can't you see? Understanding = knowing it.

And ******** to the fact that "of course everyone understands it". No, some people are too ******ed to even understand the simplest of concepts - for example that revision is just cramming the specification into your short term memory.

I would argue that if you wanted to get above your predicted grades *without* revise, perhaps you could've put a heck of a lot more effort into your work and adapt a better attitude instead of "doing **** all". Of course you have to "revise" if you didn't understand it at school - due to the fact that you didn't pay attention (after all, why would you do **** all?), which suggests a poor attitude towards your learning.

Again, I can revise 24/7 and still not understand the work. This can happen.
I can understand the work, and do not have to revise. This can happen.

God, it's a simple concept.
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Cobric
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#16
Report 11 years ago
#16
Just learn the text book as it tells you, there will be time for understanding later.
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chinaberry
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#17
Report 11 years ago
#17
You don't know the difference between hypocrisy and lying. In this case, I would be lying, instead of being hypocritical, but since I'm not, I'd advise you to spend some time in the company of a Webster's. It's a common mistake, don't feel bad, but an annoying one.

I won't get through to you, but never mind. Except that if we were face to face, you'd probably be far too intimidated to say all that, because you're two years younger than me and I know about this a little bit more than you- from the way the teachers drill everything into you about GCSE it could be my special subject on Mastermind; in fact, it could be everyone's who's ever sat a GCSE. You're ten feet high above everyone else but you shouldn't be. In the other thread I had thought you'd just done your GCSEs like everyone else; you still seemed arrogant, but then apparently you hadn't.

Don't swear at me please, what on earth have I done to deserve that? Can't you conduct a rational, polite, controlled discussion on the internet- what are you like in real life then? I am terribly, awfully sorry for the spelling mistake, I must have completely offended you. Oh, and I'm terribly sorry also about my misuse of the word 'revise'- does it really matter? That's just what work after school turns into in upper school, people just call it 'revision' and be done with it. You're quite rude you know. I did nothing in upper school because I had some personal sh't going on, who do you think you are! Telling me I should have worked harder.

Ah, so you were not skipped? But you're still bragging? You'll have a bumpy ride of it then.
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TheatreLovely
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#18
Report 11 years ago
#18
I did three GCSEs early....for RE, just do all the practices your teacher gives you, and learn the facts. Other than that, it's more down to how you write it.

For science, just learn the textbook. It worked for me. I would say that you should perhaps start about three weeks before the exam.
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