Are Some Oxbridge Degrees Worth More Than Others? Watch

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Minta
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Alaric)
curiously I've never met one, maybe they're one of the species that lives in the habitat of the university libary?

lol maybe! ASNCs are few in numbers which might also make them harder to come by (only about 20-30 taken each year)
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Schmelen
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Philo)
I agree with what you all said, I simply meant in terms of an outsider's point of view, not an employer. I know that had I got into read a medical subject (for example), people who haven't much idea about the varying degrees would've been more impressed with me than when I say I'm reading theology. I've even had comments such as "so, why do you want to go round fields, digging things up then?"(!!!) Also, I ALWAYS get people talking to me who automatically think it wont open any doors for me other than those leading into the ministry. Hence I'm not saying that perceptions about the quality of degrees are right, I'm saying that from personal experience, I believe that they exist.

At the same time, I know a number of linguists with Oxbridge degrees(who, like the medics Hilda Beast meantioned) find it difficult to find their footing once they graduate because people don't think that a language degree from Ox/Cam gives you enough oral experience as it's focused on literature.

I suppose it all depends on who you talk to!
I agree Philo, i often get that sort of response too - quite often folks think that a degree is only worth something if it is strongly vocational, like medicine or law. i get a lot of, 'well, what do you plan to do with that then' when people hear what i want to read, even though i have got a place at oxfit. Or, i have had people say things like, 'oh, you should try for PPE,' as if this is the only worthwhile degree from oxbridge as it is well known and respected etc. Like you say, i think it depends on who you talk to, but i have certainly had many experiences with people like this who seem to have very set a (and undoubtedly inaccurate) views of an oxbridge degree.
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Wal
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#23
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#23
In germany people ask "what do you study" first, afterwards where you do it.

And general opinion is, everyone (assuming decent intelligence) can study history everywhere, if he just works hard enough, whereas there are subjects you need certain talents to be succesfull, never mind where you study it (math for example).

I can't think why that shouldn't apply for Oxbridge!?
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scanner
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Wal)
In germany people ask "what do you study" first, afterwards where you do it.

And general opinion is, everyone (assuming decent intelligence) can study history everywhere, if he just works hard enough, whereas there are subjects you need certain talents to be succesfull, never mind where you study it (math for example).

I can't think why that shouldn't apply for Oxbridge!?
Not sure that's correct. Once you reach a certain level in history only people with a particular set of aptitudes and skills perform really well. If you work hard you can master most subjects to a reasonable level but it is moving beyond that level that requires different talents.

All Oxbridge degrees have a certain status because of the demands the style of study makes on students and because of the quality of many of the academic staff. Some degrees do have a certain aura - Maths at Cambridge, PPE at Oxford etc - these tend to relate to their historic strengths.
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greenrevolt
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#25
yeah but what about history? is it meant to be that competive? H&P at Ox has a 45% in
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#26
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#26
(Original post by greenrevolt)
yeah but what about history? is it meant to be that competive? H&P at Ox has a 45% in
Treat those figures with extreme caution. For the colleges that are 'strong' in history the competition is fierce. For some colleges there are many very able candidates. The figures also conceal a good deal of passing on of 'near miss' candidates to colleges with fewer and/or possibly weaker applicants. The joint schools may be even more difficult to interpret - generally the % getting in is lower.
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earthmother
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#27
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#27
(Original post by greenrevolt)
yeah but what about history? is it meant to be that competive? H&P at Ox has a 45% in

Well according to last year's prospectus (haven't seen the most recent and still not online) only 21% of applications to History and Politics were successful over the previous three years.

Or perhaps I've misunderstood what you are saying, your post seems a bit incomplete.
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LH
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#28
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#28
(Original post by greenrevolt)
yeah but what about history? is it meant to be that competive? H&P at Ox has a 45% in
More like 21%!
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fifi53
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#29
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#29
heaven forbid nayone would ever ask me to select graduate candidats for jobs... but i would put any oxbridge student at the back of the line and go for some middle of the road applicants from say nottingham/leicester/glasgow... they have some amazing depts. depends what your looking for really as to whether oxbridge do the course well. ie. if i was recruiting an archaeologist i'd take someone from leicester, cos in my opinon its an excellent dept.
from what i ahve heard if youre just ing going in to a job wheere they want a graduate of snayhing.... then i doubt theyd be intelligent enough to knoe the diff between the courses and the fact that it says oxon on it will pudh you to the top of the list.
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#30
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#30
(Original post by fifi53)
heaven forbid nayone would ever ask me to select graduate candidats for jobs... but i would put any oxbridge student at the back of the line and go for some middle of the road applicants from say nottingham/leicester/glasgow... they have some amazing depts. depends what your looking for really as to whether oxbridge do the course well. ie. if i was recruiting an archaeologist i'd take someone from leicester, cos in my opinon its an excellent dept.
from what i ahve heard if youre just ing going in to a job wheere they want a graduate of snayhing.... then i doubt theyd be intelligent enough to knoe the diff between the courses and the fact that it says oxon on it will pudh you to the top of the list.
Amazing post! Yes, many departments in several universities are 'middle of the road'. Fortunately most decent employers are looking for something a bit better than that. As you say you are not a graduate recruiter. It shows.
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yawn1
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Alaric)
Yeah they tend to, but although it'll vary a bit between colleges I'd say 30% would be far too high probably more likely to be around 10%. They rather assume that most people they pick will walk the exams.

Compared to the numbers other universities offer on and the fluctuations they get it's miniscule though.

Alaric.
According to Cambridge the percentage of offers to places varies but hovers around 33% so say 60 places, then 90 offers.

I have already recorded in another thread on Cambridge offers and acceptances, that approx. 18% of males and 20% of females (from state schools) miss their offers and are not accepted.

The figures are all available on tables on Cam website.
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earthmother
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#32
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#32
(Original post by scanner)
Treat those figures with extreme caution. For the colleges that are 'strong' in history the competition is fierce. For some colleges there are many very able candidates. The figures also conceal a good deal of passing on of 'near miss' candidates to colleges with fewer and/or possibly weaker applicants. The joint schools may be even more difficult to interpret - generally the % getting in is lower.
Well the 2005/2006 prospectus has just gone online and it's now down to a 20% success rate over the past three years.
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#33
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#33
(Original post by earthmother)
Well the 2005/2006 prospectus has just gone online and it's now down to a 20% success rate over the past three years.
The joint schools seem to be growing in popularity therefore I imagine those figures will go down further unless the colleges decide to take more. It does seem slightly odd the way these joint subjects are handled.
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earthmother
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#34
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#34
(Original post by scanner)
The joint schools seem to be growing in popularity therefore I imagine those figures will go down further unless the colleges decide to take more. It does seem slightly odd the way these joint subjects are handled.
Yes, all those who apply for the various History joint schools are in competition with each other and the solo History students for places. There's no guarantee any of them will get in if there are deemed to be better History students applying for a different course. I presume other joint schools take a similar line.
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#35
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#35
(Original post by earthmother)
Yes, all those who apply for the various History joint schools are in competition with each other and the solo History students for places. There's no guarantee any of them will get in if there are deemed to be better History students applying for a different course. I presume other joint schools take a similar line.
Some colleges in effect reserve places for joint candidates but most do not. It seems that joint school applications are rising but the places available are not keeping pace in some subjects. To deal with this it seems there is a growing trend to offer the better 'near miss' joint schools candidates places for a single subject where they seem stronger than the single candidates. So this probably makes the figures even more unreliable. Must seem like a lottery to a joint subject candidate. I assume many potential candidates just minimise their risk by opting for one subject meaning that the joint schools are missing out on the full range of potential applicants. Not the greatest piece of educational adminstration and course organisation. It's a shame as there is a strong demand for interdisciplinary degrees as the success of PPE has demonstrated over many years.
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hildabeast
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#36
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#36
I'm doing a joint school and I'm actually really impressed with the way the Oxford courses are organised. There is a good balance between them and excellent communication between tutors/faculties in the two subjects.
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earthmother
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#37
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(Original post by scanner)
Some colleges in effect reserve places for joint candidates but most do not. It seems that joint school applications are rising but the places available are not keeping pace in some subjects. To deal with this it seems there is a growing trend to offer the better 'near miss' joint schools candidates places for a single subject where they seem stronger than the single candidates. So this probably makes the figures even more unreliable. Must seem like a lottery to a joint subject candidate. I assume many potential candidates just minimise their risk by opting for one subject meaning that the joint schools are missing out on the full range of potential applicants. Not the greatest piece of educational adminstration and course organisation. It's a shame as there is a strong demand for interdisciplinary degrees as the success of PPE has demonstrated over many years.
I've heard of some who've changed to a joint school from History after a year. The other problem with the joint schools can be lack of co-ordination through the course. The two areas don't always seem to speak to each other and the students are left being pulled in two directions.
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hildabeast
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#38
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(Original post by earthmother)
I've heard of some who've changed to a joint school from History after a year. The other problem with the joint schools can be lack of co-ordination through the course. The two areas don't always seem to speak to each other and the students are left being pulled in two directions.
As stated above, I've found the complete opposite.
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scanner
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#39
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(Original post by hildabeast)
As stated above, I've found the complete opposite.

It could be that you have a better combination than for some other subjects. I've got two friends who are doing History and French/English and both have had some issues relating to the 'jointness' and bridge papers.
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Ellie4
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#40
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Is Land economy really that worthless? I was thinking of doing it, as it's more or less a perfect fit for my A-levels. What's so bad bout it?
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