Students paid to take long lie-in Watch

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aliel
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#1
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"Eight German students are being paid to stay in bed for two months as part of an effort to discover why astronauts always suffer from cold hands and feet in space.
Scientists at the Centre for Space Medicine at the Charité hospital in Berlin have hired them to lie in bed for eight weeks - the closest earthbound people can come to simulating weightlessness.

Sitting up is strictly forbidden: even showers and meals must be taken in the prone position. Doctors are hoping to discover how the blood's circulation is affected by the space-like conditions.

Humans burn about 80% of their energy fighting gravity in order to remain upright.

The researchers suggest that in space, and in bed, the heart reduces the flow of blood to the body's extremities, resulting in cold hands and feet.

The students are being paid €5,000 (£3,480) each for taking part in the research. " (Guardian online)


What are your opinions on this??
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G4ry
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It seems a bit disgusting lying down the whole time, but they're getting paid for it :eek: I know of a few people who would do it quite willingly for half that sum or less.

It's hardly going to be the same as space, the gravity and outside temperature won't be the same - so i can't see what they're going to achieve.
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llama boy
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(Original post by aliel)
"Eight German students are being paid to stay in bed for two months as part of an effort to discover why astronauts always suffer from cold hands and feet in space.

The students are being paid €5,000 (£3,480) each for taking part in the research. "

What are your opinions on this??
My opinion? I want £3,480!!! :cool:

Besides, it doesn't seem to differ too much from my usual routine anyway.
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llama boy
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(Original post by G4ry)
It seems a bit disgusting lying down the whole time
and, er, logistically, how exactly do you go to the toilet lying down?

the mind boggles...
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G4ry
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(Original post by llama boy)
and, er, logistically, how exactly do you go to the toilet lying down?

the mind boggles...
It's very easily done, albeit quite messy if you're going for #2 i'm not saying any more about that.
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llama boy
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in fact, do you actually have a source on this? :confused:
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G4ry
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(Original post by llama boy)
in fact, do you actually have a source on this? :confused:
Me? What do you mean?
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llama boy
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(Original post by G4ry)
Me? What do you mean?
nah, not you, her.

i was just starting to wonder whether it was a hoax..
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elpaw
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(Original post by G4ry)
It's very easily done, albeit quite messy if you're going for #2 i'm not saying any more about that.
you do colonic irrigation lying down, don't you? would doing a #2 be similar to that?
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Jamie
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(Original post by aliel)
"Eight German students are being paid to stay in bed for two months as part of an effort to discover why astronauts always suffer from cold hands and feet in space.
Scientists at the Centre for Space Medicine at the Charité hospital in Berlin have hired them to lie in bed for eight weeks - the closest earthbound people can come to simulating weightlessness.

Sitting up is strictly forbidden: even showers and meals must be taken in the prone position. Doctors are hoping to discover how the blood's circulation is affected by the space-like conditions.

Humans burn about 80% of their energy fighting gravity in order to remain upright.

The researchers suggest that in space, and in bed, the heart reduces the flow of blood to the body's extremities, resulting in cold hands and feet.

The students are being paid €5,000 (£3,480) each for taking part in the research. "



What are your opinions on this??
It might be close to weightless, but it sure as hell isn't. Bedridden people get stasis of the blood in their legs and arms, bed sores, higher risk of thrombosis.
And of course having to **** in a tube.....
J
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G4ry
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They usually go for #2 in a bed-pan, not a tube.
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Col-C
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(Original post by G4ry)
They usually go for #2 in a bed-pan, not a tube.
I have often wondered why these things are numbered. Why and how does everyone know which number refers to which activity? Is there a #3?
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G4ry
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(Original post by Col-C)
I have often wondered why these things are numbered. Why and how does everyone know which number refers to which activity? Is there a #3?
lol, i should hope not. Maybe do a search for it about the numbering system.
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Col-C
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(Original post by G4ry)
lol, i should hope not. Maybe do a search for it about the numbering system.
If I did that, my name would come up at the end of the year in the "Google most obscure searches of the year 2004" poll!
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G4ry
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I've already searched and haven't been very successful, i can't even find anything related to faeces. Oh well.
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way2go
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(Original post by aliel)
"Eight German students are being paid to stay in bed for two months as part of an effort to discover why astronauts always suffer from cold hands and feet in space.
Scientists at the Centre for Space Medicine at the Charité hospital in Berlin have hired them to lie in bed for eight weeks - the closest earthbound people can come to simulating weightlessness.

Sitting up is strictly forbidden: even showers and meals must be taken in the prone position. Doctors are hoping to discover how the blood's circulation is affected by the space-like conditions.

Humans burn about 80% of their energy fighting gravity in order to remain upright.

The researchers suggest that in space, and in bed, the heart reduces the flow of blood to the body's extremities, resulting in cold hands and feet.

The students are being paid €5,000 (£3,480) each for taking part in the research. "

What are your opinions on this??
These bedsitting studies are quite common. There have actually been bedsitting studies for periods of over 100 days.

One of the research areas is blood circulation. Due to the gravity here on earth a relatively large amount of the blood is in the lower parts of our bodies, such as our hands and feet. The microgravity in space will suck the blood from these areas to the main body. The head will also take up some more blood. The latter always causes serious problems when astronauts return to gravity (e.g. earth or perhaps mars in future): the first few days they are very tired and faint all the time. This is obviously not something we want to happen when we send men to Mars! That's why these bedsitting studies are quite important, namely to simulate this effect.

Another area of research of these bedsitting studies is osteoporis. Like Aliel said: "Humans burn about 80% of their energy fighting gravity in order to remain upright." So in microgravity the body tends be less active. As a result the bones need to be less strong so to say, and decalcificate. In order to resist this, astronauts on board of ISS have to do some compulsary fittness. However this is merely a solution to the problem and we sure do not want this on a mission to Mars. Therefore, amongst others, bedsitting studies are being conducted to simulate this effect and to find a remedy, which will not only help future astronauts but also millions of aged people who in fact suffer from the same disorder.

So these bedsitting studies may seem very simple and redundant, but they really are not. Someone obviously has to do them, but I wouldn't go sitting there for just 3500 pounds. That's just ridiculous. Two months of bedsitting will bore the hell out of you. Furthermore, your body will already start to show the first signs of a changed blood circulation and osteoporosis. These things may last longer than 2 months, although I am convinced that the medical staff will take care of that.

If you are interested in this topic, you should maybe consult the ESA website. I tried to find something about it. Here is a link:

http://www.esa.int/export/esaCP/SEMO...D_index_0.html

http://www.spaceflight.esa.int/users...e=coord-ao-lra
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rednirt
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(Original post by way2go)
So these bedsitting studies may seem very simple and redundant, but they really are not. Someone obviously has to do them, but I wouldn't go sitting there for just 3500 pounds. That's just ridiculous. Two months of bedsitting will bore the hell out of you. Furthermore, your body will already start to show the first signs of a changed blood circulation and osteoporosis. These things may last longer than 2 months, although I am convinced that the medical staff will take care of that.
it would bore you to death! and after some complications with surgery my god mother had to do just this, lye around for 2 months and she did indeed develop osteoporosis. Why does sh*t happens to good people eh?
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Tina
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ohhhh id get so bored......no thanx!
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starry
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Same here!
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