Year in industry...then a PhD? Watch

NathMain93
Badges: 0
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
Hi all,

Firstly, I'm looking to do chemistry as an undergraduate, and i'm thinking i'd probably like to go on to further studying for a PhD and who knows what else, thus arises mt first point; what are the sort of level of careers you can go in to and what is the typical salary for them??

Furthermore, I've been told by various people it's well worth doing a course with a year in industry, however is this as relevant for someone who then goes on to further studying following on from undergrad level? Also, does doing a year in industry vastly affect the content you cover within your course and does it in any way affect how well you perform in the degree???

I think that's everything i'd like ask...
Oh! And are the RSC likely to not accredit a chemistry course purely because you do a year in industry and potentially miss some content? This is particularly relevant for York who do a lot of modules in management...


Thanks everybody!
0
quote
reply
ScottishShortiex
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
Well the main career prospects for you would be a chemist of any sort which apparently has an average salary of £25,000 p.a. (this will increase with experience)

I would recommend a year in industry because as i am also looking to do a chemistry degree of some sort, i have also discovered that an industrial placement would be invaluable in allowing you to gain experience, which will make your employment prospects better (as will a PhD).

A year in industry should definitely not affect how you do in your degree whatsoever or affect your learning in any way as there tends to be a specific year in your course which everybody goes on placement. Most Bsc courses do not include a year in industry so i'd say you should definitely think about doing an undergraduate Masters degree!

I'm not sure about York University, but i know that in Strathclyde Uni (which is very good for chemistry) the Bsc course only has recognition with the RSC purely because the course content is not as in-depth and there is not a year in industry, whereas the Masters MChem (5 year course) has professional accreditation with the RSC because of the industrial placement and the advanced knowledge learned.

Hope this helps...if you need anymore advice PM me!
0
quote
reply
ChemistBoy
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 8 years ago
#3
A year in industry is a great thing to have on your CV and a generally good experience regardless of whether you continue on to a PhD or not. A PhD in chemistry is no guarantee of an academic career and so having a year of experience on your CV will still have value following your PhD.

The RSC actively approves of year in industry and if you are doing a undergraduate masters then it is almost certain to be accredited by the RSC. You can check at www.rsc.org., but I know all of York's chemistry degrees are recognised by the RSC. The RSC require a masters level qualification or equivalent experience to be considered for progression to chartered status.

As for typical salaries I've seen people with PhDs get jobs straight after ranging from £25k upto £50k depending on the sector and company. PhDs are generally expected to enter into industry at a higher level than graduates and start of (sometimes) in more technical roles.

If you would like more information on PhDs, the RSC or industry PM me.
0
quote
reply
Chemist548
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
A year in industry is a great thing to have on your CV and a generally good experience regardless of whether you continue on to a PhD or not. A PhD in chemistry is no guarantee of an academic career and so having a year of experience on your CV will still have value following your PhD.

The RSC actively approves of year in industry and if you are doing a undergraduate masters then it is almost certain to be accredited by the RSC. You can check at www.rsc.org., but I know all of York's chemistry degrees are recognised by the RSC. The RSC require a masters level qualification or equivalent experience to be considered for progression to chartered status.

As for typical salaries I've seen people with PhDs get jobs straight after ranging from £25k upto £50k depending on the sector and company. PhDs are generally expected to enter into industry at a higher level than graduates and start of (sometimes) in more technical roles.

If you would like more information on PhDs, the RSC or industry PM me.
£50K? The highest I'd heard of previously was around £38k for GSK's PhD graduates. What sort of company/sector/role offers £50k?

And, on an unrelated note, do you think it's worth joining the RSC as a PhD student?

Thanks
0
quote
reply
ChemistBoy
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by Chemist548)
£50K? The highest I'd heard of previously was around £38k for GSK's PhD graduates. What sort of company/sector/role offers £50k?

And, on an unrelated note, do you think it's worth joining the RSC as a PhD student?

Thanks
Consultancy. Mckinsey junior associate starting salaries can be in this range, for example.
0
quote
reply
X

Reply to thread

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Lincoln
    Brayford Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 12 Dec '18
  • Bournemouth University
    Midwifery Open Day at Portsmouth Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 12 Dec '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All undergraduate Undergraduate
    Wed, 12 Dec '18

Do you like exams?

Yes (135)
18.6%
No (440)
60.61%
Not really bothered about them (151)
20.8%

Watched Threads

View All