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Bhaal85
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Kurdt Morello)
Internet Service Providers really need to prevent people accessing sick and dangerous sites like child pornography and terrorist sites - why are they reacting so slowly to these obvious problems. Maybe the govt. should do something more to restrict access to particular sites. What do you think?
Free speech, and civil rights. However I agree that stuff like that should not be on the net, but sadly there is not much you can do about it. Get a copy of NetNanny or run a filter.
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AT82
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Kurdt Morello)
that information should be made free and accessible to the authorities so that the police can monitor suspicious web activity
Yes and I think there has been a law passed so the ISPs can't get out of this loop hole. In the future it should be easier for these ***** to get caought hopefully. This in area which I may end up working in as I understand all the technology behind it because of my course.
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Kurdt Morello
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Bhaal85)
Free speech, and civil rights. However I agree that stuff like that should not be on the net, but sadly there is not much you can do about it. Get a copy of NetNanny or run a filter.
that's all well and good but authorities need to stop others accessing that stuff - why did i start such a crappy subject
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Alaric
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#24
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#24
(Original post by amazingtrade)
Yes and I think there has been a law passed so the ISPs can't get out of this loop hole. In the future it should be easier for these ***** to get caought hopefully. This in area which I may end up working in as I understand all the technology behind it because of my course.
The Regulation of Investigatory Powers act (2000), widely criticised as a severe invasion of privacy. It has several dubious aspects, particularly in regard to the tracking of meta-data without warrant and the reverse burden of proof over encryption technologies.

While I see that some of the material available on the internet is offensive and potentially illegal in this country, I don't think widespread censorship is an approach that a supposedly civilised country should be taking.

Alaric.
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DanMushMan
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#25
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even if websites could be controlled, most file sharing is done through p2p, where the data isn't stored at a central location
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Alaric
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#26
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#26
(Original post by DanMushMan)
even if websites could be controlled, most file sharing is done through p2p, where the data isn't stored at a central location
Moreover they can be designed with perfect plausible deniability and encryption, this means that it would be impossible to prove where files actually came from and whether they were even transfered!

The last thing the government needs is people deploying that level of sophistication!

Alaric.
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Kurdt Morello
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Alaric)
Moreover they can be designed with perfect plausible deniability and encryption, this means that it would be impossible to prove where files actually came from and whether they were even transfered!

The last thing the government needs is people deploying that level of sophistication!

Alaric.
u seem well versed in the technicalities of the internet - how available is this level of sophistication
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Alaric
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Kurdt Morello)
u seem well versed in the technicalities of the internet - how available is this level of sophistication
There are already some pretty well developed projects such as Freenet, which although they don't quite achieve perfection yet, they're certainly more advanced than the police would appear to be able to deal with. Government agencies would be another matter at the moment.

Such systems still have some serious problems with malicious insiders and the latency/bandwidth consumption. I'd assert, however, that if they are able to overcome the malicious insider problem then there should be a case for true plausible deniability. I rather suspect that these new generation p2p networks are probably already able to be deployed on a small scale, and it may not be long before they scale well up to full internet size. Scaling well for a pseudonomous/anonomous system is still likely to be using a lot more bandwidth/latency than traditional systems.
Generally Freenet has a fair way to go, but the point is that it's out there already, and the theories are pretty sound.

The next few years should see more products, like freenet, emerge. The security of files on computers if the computer is siezed is still a rather difficult one, however, there may be some scope for plausible deniability there even with agressive bills (such as RIP 2000) with respect to keys and proposed (and failed) schemes like key escrow.

Alaric.
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