What is the difference between Germany and Prussia? Watch

louiseyeah
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Apparently, there was Prussia, which in 1971 divided into Prussia and the German Empire?

I have no idea, please help!
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username202682
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(Original post by louiseyeah)
Apparently, there was Prussia, which in 1971 divided into Prussia and the German Empire?

I have no idea, please help!
You mean 1871.
Before Germany's Unification in 1871, there were four Kingdoms
- Prussia
- Bavaria
- Saxony
- Württemberg

After the wars of unifications, these Kingdoms made up the majority of what is now known as Germany by Wilhelm I, who was made Kaiser of the new German state

Anything else?
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there's too much love
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(Original post by Stricof)
You mean 1871.
Before Germany's Unification in 1871, there were four Kingdoms
- Prussia
- Bavaria
- Saxony
- Württemberg

After the wars of unifications, these Kingdoms made up the majority of what is now known as Germany by Wilhelm I, who was made Kaiser of the new German state

Anything else?
Then his son went "wassup western Europe, wanna see some gas n early tanks, bring it biatches" right?
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Jez RR
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I believe Prussia as a State (as opposed to a Kingdom) was abolished by the Nazis as an entity in the 1930s. East Prussia basically became part of Poland after WWII. Apart from Koenigsberg / Kaliningrad, which became Russian, as it is today.
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username202682
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(Original post by there's too much love)
Then his son went "wassup western Europe, wanna see some gas n early tanks, bring it biatches" right?
Well. Both the Western and the Eastern fronts tbh :p: Weltpolitik = World Policy :wink2:
(Original post by Jez RR)
I believe Prussia as a State (as opposed to a Kingdom) was abolished by the Nazis as an entity in the 1930s. East Prussia basically became part of Poland after WWII. Apart from Koenigsberg / Kaliningrad, which became Russian, as it is today.
This isn't even relevant tbh :p:?!
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Jez RR
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(Original post by Stricof)
This isn't even relevant tbh :p:?!
Interesting though, don't you think?

Much of the conflicting opinions between the regular army and the SS seems to have stemmed from a deap-seated Nazi suspicion of the officer class. 'Those damned Prussians', as Hitler may or may not have once said.
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there's too much love
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(Original post by Stricof)
Well. Both the Western and the Eastern fronts tbh :p: Weltpolitik = World Policy :wink2:
This isn't even relevant tbh :p:?!
All at the same time, I thought that he went to war with Russia later on in the war. I'm probably mistaken though.
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username202682
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(Original post by Jez RR)
Interesting though, don't you think?

Much of the conflicting opinions between the regular army and the SS seems to have stemmed from a deap-seated Nazi suspicion of the officer class. 'Those damned Prussians', as Hitler may or may not have once said.
If we are to be pedantic, Prussia was abolished, de jure, in 1947 but de facto in 1934

Well the SA were pretty much integrated into the German Army + SS as a result of Operation Hummingbird and the Enabling Act. The SA seemed unruly. Much like the Spartacist movement. We can compare the two because both appeared to want revolution in the sense of the term. But Hitler learnt from November 1923's failure.
(Original post by there's too much love)
All at the same time, I thought that he went to war with Russia later on in the war. I'm probably mistaken though.
Well obviously the Schlieffen Plan was devised to attack the Western Front and then the Eastern front due to the belief that Russia would take a long time to mobilise. Unfortunately this was not the case and although, yes, Russia came into the war ever so slightly later, Germany was fighting on two fronts for most of the war until the armistice.
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there's too much love
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(Original post by Stricof)
If we are to be pedantic, Prussia was abolished, de jure, in 1947 but de facto in 1934

Well the SS were pretty much integrated into the German Army after Operation Hummingbird. The SS seemed unruly. Much like the Spartacist movement. We can compare the two because both appeared to want revolution in the sense of the term. But Hitler learnt from November 1923's failure.
Well obviously the Schlieffen Plan was devised to attack the Western Front and then the Eastern front due to the belief that Russia would take a long time to mobilise. Unfortunately this was not the case and although, yes, Russia came into the war ever so slightly later, Germany was fighting on two fronts for most of the war until the armistice.
Oh yeah...it's all coming back to me now.
I've got the black hand gang in my head now, and the story of how they finally got to Franz:p: .
Wait, 'unfortunately'...
...you wanted the Kaiser to succeed?
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username202682
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(Original post by there's too much love)
Oh yeah...it's all coming back to me now.
I've got the black hand gang in my head now, and the story of how they finally got to Franz:p: .
Wait, 'unfortunately'...
...you wanted the Kaiser to succeed?
Unfortunately in the sense that the Schlieffen Plan had not been modified since 1906. Unfortunate in the sense that Russia was industrialising quickly since Alexander III's reign. It is unfortunate for them :p:
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there's too much love
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(Original post by Stricof)
Unfortunately in the sense that the Schlieffen Plan had not been modified since 1906. Unfortunate in the sense that Russia was industrialising quickly since Alexander III's reign. It is unfortunate for them :p:
You actually want the Germans to be in control...
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username202682
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(Original post by there's too much love)
You actually want the Germans to be in control...
One of the many 'What if's' amongst history students such as myself and historians :wink2:
I haven't really considered who I'd support. I think there is scope to argue that Germany stumbled into war, rather than planned a war of aggression and conquest
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there's too much love
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(Original post by Stricof)
One of the many 'What if's' amongst history students such as myself and historians :wink2:
I haven't really considered who I'd support. I think there is scope to argue that Germany stumbled into war, rather than planned a war of aggression and conquest
"I say, we've accidentally invaded Belgium and France,oh goodness and now Russia too".
Maybe it's because it's in English instead of German but I'm struggling here:awesome:.
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jimbo139
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(Original post by Stricof)
One of the many 'What if's' amongst history students such as myself and historians :wink2:
I haven't really considered who I'd support. I think there is scope to argue that Germany stumbled into war, rather than planned a war of aggression and conquest
well possibly. but when you point a loaded gun at your rival and then accidentally shoot them, your intention to kill or not is often disregarded.
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username202682
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(Original post by there's too much love)
"I say, we've accidentally invaded Belgium and France,oh goodness and now Russia too".
Maybe it's because it's in English instead of German but I'm struggling here:awesome:.
Don't ignore the Eastern front and Scandinavia tbh. When Austria-Hungary announced its annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Bosnian Crisis, Germany had some honouring to do through the Triple Alliance established. Now you see, helping Austria-Hungary attack an ally of Russia would cause Russia to come into War. Then Germany's involvement with Russia would have sparked off the Triple Entente agreement with Britain and France. So there is scope to argue Germany stumbled into war, certainly.
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(Original post by jimbo139)
well possibly. but when you point a loaded gun at your rival and then accidentally shoot them, your intention to kill or not is often disregarded.
Depends if the other person is also holding a loaded gun to you, tbh :p:
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PNEJOE
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(Original post by louiseyeah)
Apparently, there was Prussia, which in 1971 divided into Prussia and the German Empire?

I have no idea, please help!
Germany originally was just loads and loads of little city states and countries loosely connected in the Holy Roman Empire (sometimes it became a stronger connection)

The Duke of Brandenburg was the guy in the Berlin city state and the surrounding area, he eventually got hold of the land of ostprussia, and his countries name changed to Prussia.

This Prussian state was very militaristic and by the mid 19th century had managed to be one of the, if not THE most powerful German state.

Napoleon got rid of the holy roman empire and after him several attempts at varying German confederates were attempted, eventually Prussia united the remaining states around 1870s violently!

Prussia remained a state under Germanys confederate system until the end of the 2nd world war when the Allies decided Prussia as a state was far to dangerous and dismantled it.

Most of Prussia stayed in east Germany until unification and the state of prussia within Germany has never been recreated.

That was all off the top of my head so corrections might be needed but hopefully that clears it up!
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jimbo139
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(Original post by Stricof)
Depends if the other person is also holding a loaded gun to you, tbh :p:
Very true. Though that seems not to have been judged relevant in this case (Versailles etc).

Take home message: if you're going to shoot someone, make sure they're dead.
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username202682
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(Original post by jimbo139)
Very true. Though that seems not to have been judged relevant in this case (Versailles etc).

Take home message: if you're going to shoot someone, make sure they're dead.
You're right. I suppose one has to question the extent to which the brutality of Treaty was justified.
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Paul PTS
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(Original post by louiseyeah)
Apparently, there was Prussia, which in 1971 divided into Prussia and the German Empire?

I have no idea, please help!
Just get and read his book.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_von_Bismarck
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