This discussion is closed.
J.S.
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#81
Report 16 years ago
#81
(Original post by claire1985)
I class any degree that is not academic by traditional standards as a joke, for example:
Media Studies
Surf/Beckhamology
Golf Management
Gender Studies (at undergraduate level)
Public Relations
Computer Studies
Film Studies
The list goes on, I mean why would you want to know, or need a degree to prove your worth in the majority of these subjects? It is crazy....!

Always amuses me when people dismiss something they've not studied as being a 'joke'.

It happens from both ends. There are people that consider Philosophy, History, English as being utter rubbish, a total waste of time. This is particularly the case with many Asian parents. Here I recall a friend of mine who wanted to study English at Univ., to this idea, her parents replied, "but, don't you bloody know English, why not actually go and learn something 'useful' at university, such as Law or Medicine". Hilarious!
So, here there is a group of people that's willing to dismiss a set of courses as being a 'waste of time', on the grounds that they believe them to have no vocational value.

On this newsgroup, and particularly at many of the traditional universities, I've seen the exact opposite! Personally, I think a lot of this criticism comes from insecurity. People want to feel important when they secure their degree, a massive influx of Tom, **** and Prasad having studied various 'joke' courses makes those with academic degree's feel as though their position of status is under threat, methinks. Perhaps that's why they get so worked up about it! I mean, what difference does it make to someone studying Physics at IC, if another person taking Hair and Salon Studies refers to what they study as a BSc? I mean, it's not as though a prospective employer is likely to confuse one for the other, is it?

Argh!
0
Toyosi
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#82
Report 16 years ago
#82
The thing about something like surf studies is that it's too specialised so you might not be able to get a job where u can put the skills you've gained to use and other employers won't take you seriously because you've gone to a not so good uni and done a course that on the face of it looks like a joke
0
LongGone
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#83
Report 16 years ago
#83
(Original post by Toyosi)
The thing about something like surf studies is that it's too specialised so you might not be able to get a job where u can put the skills you've gained to use and other employers won't take you seriously because you've gone to a not so good uni and done a course that on the face of it looks like a joke
I agree that things like surf studies probably aren't best to be studied at Uni, and it would probably be better for your employment prospects to do a related but broader course.

It's the constant attacks on Media Studies (or any of the less traditional subjects) by people who've never studied them that gets on my nerves.

I've taken both Media and Film for A Level, and they are not useless subjects only taken people who aren't clever enough to do anything else. I get quite offended by the suggestion. Some people may take them because they think they're easy, but they're in for a nasty shock. I've also taken History and English Language (and gotten better marks than in the Media and Film) and I'm going to study Politics at university.
0
Kirki
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#84
Report 16 years ago
#84
I mean, what difference does it make to someone studying Physics at IC, if another person taking Hair and Salon Studies refers to what they study as a BSc?
The problem comes in with funding. Currently, our taxes are used to fund all of these courses. There is obviously a problem with funding in universities, they simply cannot cope with large intakes. The government is proposing increasing this number still further. Clearly the universities cannot afford this on their current funding. It affects the physics student because he is going to be paying for the Hair and Salon Studies student to be trained, which could just as easily have been done by the Industry and so not payed for by the physics student. If these people were trained in the traditional manner, then perhaps the universities could afford to teach the subjects that cannot be taught elsewhere.

I'm very happy to be persuaded otherwise, but this is how I see it. If it were merely a case of academic snobbery, then I'd agree you that there is no harm in these subjects being taught there. I see it as nothing more than basic economics, though. Why should the government be subsidising the Beauty Industry?
0
LongGone
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#85
Report 16 years ago
#85
I agree that things like Hair and Salon studies would probably be better studied at something like a further education college or learnt on the job. I would assume that you wouldn't need A levels to do a course like that anyway, which means there seems little point it being taught in University. That doesn't make it a joke course as such, it just means that it's not being taught in the best way or most cost effective way.
0
Kirki
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#86
Report 16 years ago
#86
(Original post by Frances)
I agree that things like Hair and Salon studies would probably be better studied at something like a further education college or learnt on the job. I would assume that you wouldn't need A levels to do a course like that anyway, which means there seems little point it being taught in University. That doesn't make it a joke course as such, it just means that it's not being taught in the best way or most cost effective way.
Oh, yes, I completely agree . I have no objections to the courses, just where they are taught.
0
Lurker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#87
Report 16 years ago
#87
(Original post by J.S.)
I mean, what difference does it make to someone studying Physics at IC, if another person taking Hair and Salon Studies refers to what they study as a BSc? I mean, it's not as though a prospective employer is likely to confuse one for the other, is it?
As if the HE system isn't under enough strain, without having to fund courses like BSc hairdressing, which people can just as easily train for while they do a job.
Besides which, it's wrong! People shouldn't be made to feel as if their education is worthless without some degree at the end of it.
0
Lurker
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#88
Report 16 years ago
#88
Ok, I should've read the rest of the page before I replied to that. Kirki said it before me, and explained it further than me anyway. Sorry my rep's not worth much, but have some anyway Kirki.
0
AT82
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#89
Report 16 years ago
#89
It always make me laugh when people who diss computing as a micky mouse subject. I once had argument on a one of these forums because some girl was saying web development was piss easy all you do is move the mouse. I just said to her start notepad, access and photoshop and in 2 hours time produce me an onlineshop

I think people tend to diss subjects they are ignorant too. Computing is not easy especialy computer science. Assembly Langauge for example is very mathematical as you need to be able to work in decimal, binary and hexadecimal. The joke is this girl calling me micky mouse was studying media studies at Greenwich too which is in the like the bottom 110.
0
LongGone
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#90
Report 16 years ago
#90
I would never call computing or computer science a joke course. You do need to be clever to do it- most good Unis won't let you in without a good grade at A Level maths.

It may not be a "traditional" subject, but we can't stay stuck in the past forever.
0
Mark_KK
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#91
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#91
Judging from what is being said on here the definition of a joke course seems to be very subjective.

It seems that what really matters is what employers PERCIEVE to be a joke course.

One thing that really did interest me is the when someone claimed that media organisations would take English, Maths etc over a degree in Media Studies.

If this is true then anyone hoping to study Media Studies should surley consider their options.

In my opinion there are three things you need to consider when taking a degree (in no particular order):

1.
What are the career prospects once you have completed the degree hopefully with a reasonable result? Are you looking to do a general degree to widen your options or are you persuing a particular career (e.g. computer science). If you are persuing a general degree then you need to consider how employers percieve your chosen course as not to spend three years racking up debt doing something that will not really further your career options.

2.
Will you enjoy the degree? Dont sign up for three years of slog studying something that you have no interest in.

3.
Where are you intending to study. This makes a big difference and can be just as important as what you are studying. There are three main types of Uni - Traditional (Oxbridge, Durham and one or two others) Red Brick (Nottingham, Leeds, Manchester, Newcastle, Lancaster, Hull etc...) and Converted Polytechnic (Sheffield Hallam, Leeds Met etc...).
If you are applying to an ex-polytechnic you need to do your research. ALOT OF THESE ARE VERY GOOD INSTITUTIONS however there are some that are not very well respected at all and may do you more harm then good in the career market.
0
claire1985
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#92
Report 16 years ago
#92
(Original post by Kirki)
The problem comes in with funding. Currently, our taxes are used to fund all of these courses. There is obviously a problem with funding in universities, they simply cannot cope with large intakes. The government is proposing increasing this number still further. Clearly the universities cannot afford this on their current funding. It affects the physics student because he is going to be paying for the Hair and Salon Studies student to be trained, which could just as easily have been done by the Industry and so not payed for by the physics student. If these people were trained in the traditional manner, then perhaps the universities could afford to teach the subjects that cannot be taught elsewhere.

I'm very happy to be persuaded otherwise, but this is how I see it. If it were merely a case of academic snobbery, then I'd agree you that there is no harm in these subjects being taught there. I see it as nothing more than basic economics, though. Why should the government be subsidising the Beauty Industry?
Precisely, except the way i see it- we shouldn't be subsidising any joke courses. The way i see it is my degree is going to be worth less because a BA will be common place because rubbish univerisities allow people on to their History course with DD! If you are getting DD, you shouldn't bother.... So i think the best plan of action is to shut down all the ex-poly 'universiities' (i.e. APU etc) and give degrees back the respect and rarity they deserve.
0
claire1985
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#93
Report 16 years ago
#93
(Original post by amazingtrade)
It always make me laugh when people who diss computing as a micky mouse subject. I once had argument on a one of these forums because some girl was saying web development was piss easy all you do is move the mouse. I just said to her start notepad, access and photoshop and in 2 hours time produce me an onlineshop

I think people tend to diss subjects they are ignorant too. Computing is not easy especialy computer science. Assembly Langauge for example is very mathematical as you need to be able to work in decimal, binary and hexadecimal. The joke is this girl calling me micky mouse was studying media studies at Greenwich too which is in the like the bottom 110.
I don't think i dissed Computer Science, i think it was 'Computer Studies'-which i understand to be a much easier version of CSci
0
AT82
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#94
Report 16 years ago
#94
(Original post by claire1985)
I don't think i dissed Computer Science, i think it was 'Computer Studies'-which i understand to be a much easier version of CSci
What does computer studies involve?
0
Kirki
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#95
Report 16 years ago
#95
Sorry my rep's not worth much, but have some anyway Kirki.
Hehehehe, thank you!

What are the career prospects once you have completed the degree hopefully with a reasonable result?
Debatably important! I mean, I'm planning to do further study once I've finished my degree, so the career prospects from undergrad I don't really find that important (Good thing too, considering my subject!). Unless we're counting further study as a career option?
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (388)
67.24%
No (189)
32.76%

Watched Threads

View All