haruka
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#1
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#1
I was just reading the new student thing, about what to bring and not to bring, and i noticed that rice cooker is not allowed, very surprisingly! anyone know why they are not allowed?
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RachelD
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maybe they take up too much electricity? that's apparently the case with mini-fridges and that lol. take uncle ben's?
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tehforum
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It shouldn't matter, what's so hard about boiling water and putting rice in.
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grape:)
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Or you could just use a saucepan? :confused:
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Broderss
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Use the microwave or a hob like everyone else.
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$tar£reaker
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I never got the point of rice cookers :holmes:
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nadiah
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(Original post by tehforum)
It shouldn't matter, what's so hard about boiling water and putting rice in.

I've never understood this either...nobody I know cooks their own rice, They all use rice cookers or boil in the bag....honestly I don't get what's so hard about doing it the old fashioned way :P
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A.galloway
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you could try and get a geiser, like in the adverts.

but that is still boil in the bag.
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haruka
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rice cooker just always the easiest way to cook rice. you don't have to worry about the rice being overcook or anything
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LSE-or-Broke
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And you can just toss the rice in there and vanish till later. Maybe that's why they're banned, because people left them on forever and used up all the electricity.
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Gandalf_is_a_girl
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I expected this thread to be in the LSE section.
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Rooster523
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put rice in saucepan, put water on rice, turn on hob, place saucepan on hob.

unless your magic rice cooker sucks you off whilst making your rice, I don't see how it could get much simpler
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FireDeuce
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Rice cookers are allowed.
The deal with the rice cookers was that people had to get their electricals PAT tested. Loads of international students brought their rice cookers from places without strict guidelines on electrical, they failed the test and the cords were cut on them so they couldn't be used.

If you buy it in the UK it should be fine.
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A.galloway
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(Original post by FireDeuce)
Rice cookers are allowed.
The deal with the rice cookers was that people had to get their electricals PAT tested. Loads of international students brought their rice cookers from places without strict guidelines on electrical, they failed the test and the cords were cut on them so they couldn't be used.

If you buy it in the UK it should be fine.
all they do is cut the cord to stop people using appliances? its not hard to fix.
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indy_punk
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ummm Aston allows certain appliances on the not allowed list as long the on site electrician (?) approves it first....it used to be about 10quid or something to have 3 items approved. Of course if you are no longer allowed to bring it at all under all circumstances then that is definitely a very new rule.Everyone I knew had one!
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LSE-or-Broke
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(Original post by FireDeuce)
Rice cookers are allowed.
Then why does the Student Information Guide state over and over again that they're not allowed?
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mrnightcat
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(Original post by Rooster523)
put rice in saucepan, put water on rice, turn on hob, place saucepan on hob.

unless your magic rice cooker sucks you off whilst making your rice, I don't see how it could get much simpler
-Cooking rice on a hob requires careful watching, adjustments of temperature to avoid boiling, and judgement of when is exactly the right time to take the rice out. Let it cook for a minute too long and it burns - then you've got to scrub all the burnt mess out the bottom.

-Cooking on a hob also takes more time. 15 mins vs. 8-10 minutes in my cooker.

-You can focus on anything else whilst using a rice cooker. Bung in the rice, turn on the cooker and do anything you like. When the rice is finished, the internal thermostat will turn the machine to a warming mode, which will not cook the rice but will keep it warm. Good rice cookers never burn rice.

-Rice cookers save a damn load of gas usage. Imagine how much gas you're using to cook rice on a hob for 15m+? Rice cookers do not use a lot of electricity, and if yours does, yours is not very good and you need a new one. I use my rice cooker almost three times a day every day, and it is barely noticeable on the bill.

-You can cook almost anything in a rice cooker. Good rice cookers have a tall bowl inside and space above to put a steaming basket/plate - using this, you can cook vegetables, dumplings, anything that can be steamed. You can cook soups inside, stews and keep a hotpot running.

Honestly, not to be rude, but do I need to go on? I'm British myself, but I'm always so mystified when people ask why on earth someone would need a rice cooker. Using a pan is far less efficient than using a rice cooker. We're all busy students and want to make a quick meal sometimes - all I need to do is drop in the rice, put in the water, then put in all my vegetables in the steaming basket - carrots, broccoli, tofu, anything. Close the lid, turn it on, 10 mins later you've got perfect steamed rice with steamed vegetables. If you need anything more, fry up a bit of meat or cook up a basic sauce.

To do the above without a rice cooker, I'd first have to cook the rice in the pan, buy a separate steamer for the vegetables, boil them in a different pan or cook them some other way.

I mean, why do you think virtually every household in Japan, China, etc own a rice cooker? Why do people think almost every international student from those countries brings one or buys one? It's not to spite you! It's all for healthy, quick meals. My one cost me equivalent to 10 pounds and is a good, efficient model. I'd choose it anyday over fussing over a stove.
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Ganzoars
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I'm Chinese and I'd never live without a rice cooker. Seriously. I use it everyday to cook rice, to make soup, to hide keys in... :P

But in all honesty, I believe that the orignal poster is Asian, and I can understand his bewilderment at banning rice cookers... They're an essential part of cooking for Asians. We just don't cook rice in pots. It's easier, faster and a lot nicer to cook rice in a rice cooker! (Well, at least to us anyway)
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cezz_18
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(Original post by mrnightcat)
-Cooking rice on a hob requires careful watching, adjustments of temperature to avoid boiling, and judgement of when is exactly the right time to take the rice out. Let it cook for a minute too long and it burns - then you've got to scrub all the burnt mess out the bottom.

-Cooking on a hob also takes more time. 15 mins vs. 8-10 minutes in my cooker.

-You can focus on anything else whilst using a rice cooker. Bung in the rice, turn on the cooker and do anything you like. When the rice is finished, the internal thermostat will turn the machine to a warming mode, which will not cook the rice but will keep it warm. Good rice cookers never burn rice.

-Rice cookers save a damn load of gas usage. Imagine how much gas you're using to cook rice on a hob for 15m+? Rice cookers do not use a lot of electricity, and if yours does, yours is not very good and you need a new one. I use my rice cooker almost three times a day every day, and it is barely noticeable on the bill.

-You can cook almost anything in a rice cooker. Good rice cookers have a tall bowl inside and space above to put a steaming basket/plate - using this, you can cook vegetables, dumplings, anything that can be steamed. You can cook soups inside, stews and keep a hotpot running.

Honestly, not to be rude, but do I need to go on? I'm British myself, but I'm always so mystified when people ask why on earth someone would need a rice cooker. Using a pan is far less efficient than using a rice cooker. We're all busy students and want to make a quick meal sometimes - all I need to do is drop in the rice, put in the water, then put in all my vegetables in the steaming basket - carrots, broccoli, tofu, anything. Close the lid, turn it on, 10 mins later you've got perfect steamed rice with steamed vegetables. If you need anything more, fry up a bit of meat or cook up a basic sauce.

To do the above without a rice cooker, I'd first have to cook the rice in the pan, buy a separate steamer for the vegetables, boil them in a different pan or cook them some other way.

I mean, why do you think virtually every household in Japan, China, etc own a rice cooker? Why do people think almost every international student from those countries brings one or buys one? It's not to spite you! It's all for healthy, quick meals. My one cost me equivalent to 10 pounds and is a good, efficient model. I'd choose it anyday over fussing over a stove.


i totally agree. im asian and rice is a big part of my diet and shamefully, i could never ever cook rice PROPERLY without a rice cooker. some people make it sound so easy cooking rice on a hob. i bet half of those people burn their rice or undercook their rice. and a rice cooker is definitely more convenient especially for busy people who don't have time to check their cooking every few minutes!
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danny111
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(Original post by nadiah)
I've never understood this either...nobody I know cooks their own rice, They all use rice cookers or boil in the bag....honestly I don't get what's so hard about doing it the old fashioned way :P
You can leave the rice in their for a few days as far as I know and it is much simpler. Add some water come back in a few and done. Plus the rice tastes the same. Saves so much time.

Plus I don't buy the bull**** about too much electricity. If you use the rice cooker you aren't using the stove or the microwave. Surely the cooker can't use up that much more electricity? But maybe it does.
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