Tony Blair is pushing it now!!!!! Watch

This discussion is closed.
The_Barman
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#1
I dunno about anyone else but Tony Blair has got me well annoyed about him trying to screw students out of tuition fees for upto £3000...i think its xtremely low and discourages students to study. Am i alone on this or does anyone else feel the same?
0
elpaw
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 16 years ago
#2
(Original post by The_Barman)
I dunno about anyone else but that F**K Tony Blair has got me well annoyed about him trying to screw students out of tuition fees for upto £3000...i think its xtremely low and discourages students to study. Am i alone on this or does anyone else feel the same?
higher education needs the funding. but it wouldnt be a hindrance if there were less mickey mouse courses.
0
Dude
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 16 years ago
#3
(Original post by The_Barman)
I dunno about anyone else but Tony Blair has got me well annoyed about him trying to screw students out of tuition fees for upto £3000...i think its xtremely low and discourages students to study. Am i alone on this or does anyone else feel the same?
well it doesn't bother me cos tution is free for me.

(plus thats what yo're exepted to pay in America aint it).
0
starry
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 16 years ago
#4
(Original post by elpaw)
higher education needs the funding. but it wouldnt be a hindrance if there were less mickey mouse courses.
good point
0
waiting2smile
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report 16 years ago
#5
(Original post by The_Barman)
I dunno about anyone else but Tony Blair has got me well annoyed about him trying to screw students out of tuition fees for upto £3000...i think its xtremely low and discourages students to study. Am i alone on this or does anyone else feel the same?
I'm still undecided on whether that's a bad or good thing, my initial reaction was 'how dare he!?' but reading up on it, he has some good reason's i've got to say...
0
El_Borish
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 16 years ago
#6
not hat i agree with Blair's plan, bit his is better than the tory one.

lesser of two evils situation really
0
Howard
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report 16 years ago
#7
(Original post by El_Borish)
not hat i agree with Blair's plan, bit his is better than the tory one.

lesser of two evils situation really
What was the tory one?
0
Brown Patrick Bateman
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 16 years ago
#8
(Original post by The_Barman)
I dunno about anyone else but Tony Blair has got me well annoyed about him trying to screw students out of tuition fees for upto £3000...i think its xtremely low and discourages students to study. Am i alone on this or does anyone else feel the same?
Yet another ill-informed judgement. What's discouraging people is that they don't know the facts, and think they all have to pay £3k a year... in fairness the proposals really must be spelt out in English.

Basically it's maximum £3k a year for those (parents) can afford it, if you're poor you don't have to pay squat. You only pay back the fees once you've graduated ("You don't pay zip till ur blinging" according to those awful government adverts), and only pay them back at a rate of about 10% of your wage so it shouldn't be an overburdening of debt.

And if it reduces the number of people going to university then that's actually a good thing - their strive to make more and more people go to uni means last year there were 42 graduates applying per job, compared to 37 last year. The degree is being devalued whilst there's much less competition over other skilled and well decently paid jobs which don't require an academic degree.

And universities are about to face a funding crisis - already top institutions like Durham have had to close down departments because they have no funding. How else should the Government fund education? The NUS idea of having a free grant for every student means £6.6bn a year expenditure = economic ludicracy.

At present the people who complain about £1100 tuition fees annually are the often the same ones who then boast about spending £40 in a night on booze, and spend summer dossing. Spend your vacations in paid employment and you can easily afford university. And be more prepared come graduation.
0
El_Borish
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report 16 years ago
#9
(Original post by Howard)
What was the tory one?
not sure about the fine details, but it was something to do with scapping tuition fees (thats the "arent we great- elect us" bit), but making it loads harder to get in, and then hiding the charges in admin costs and things like that anyway.
0
El_Borish
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 16 years ago
#10
The NUS idea of having a free grant for every student means £6.6bn a year expenditure = economic ludicracy
not that i disagree, but isn't that about how much the government spent on the war this year?

...and on afghanistan last year..

..and *etc etc*
0
Howard
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#11
Report 16 years ago
#11
I'd go along with this Jools.
0
waiting2smile
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#12
Report 16 years ago
#12
(Original post by Howard)
I'd go along with this Jools.
Perhaps...i don't know...i need more convincing but i wouldn't attack mr blair right now (although he's done and said so much that has infuriated me), but i do agree with universities getting the neccessary funding they need.
0
emom100
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#13
Report 16 years ago
#13
you've got to remember though that it isn't just the cost of the tuition costs, theres living costs. I'm no looking for accomodation out of hall for next year and they've given us a lsit of potenital outgoings and they reckon tha you need to budget for around £8000 a year where i am for hings like rent, bills, entertainment etc. Bearing in mind the max loan at the moment is £4000 is doesn't take a genius to work out there is already a hell of a deficit. My course is 4 years so if i'm going to need 8 grand a year for the next 3 i'm already going to be about £20,000 in debt. I feel so sorry for the people that are going to have to pay extra tition fees on top of that.
0
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#14
Report 16 years ago
#14
(Original post by Jools)
Yet another ill-informed judgement.
...
and only pay them back at a rate of about 10% of your wage so it shouldn't be an overburdening of debt.
....
And be more prepared come graduation.
Well said Jools

Although just to clarify it isn't even at ~10% of your wage it's 9% of your wage above £15,000...so if you're earning £20k you pay back £37.50 a month (out of your £1400 net pay), if you're earning £50k you pay back £337.50 a month (out of your £2500+ net pay).
0
Harry Potter
Badges:
#15
Report 16 years ago
#15
(Original post by Jools)
Yet another ill-informed judgement. What's discouraging people is that they don't know the facts, and think they all have to pay £3k a year... in fairness the proposals really must be spelt out in English.

Basically it's maximum £3k a year for those (parents) can afford it, if you're poor you don't have to pay squat. You only pay back the fees once you've graduated ("You don't pay zip till ur blinging" according to those awful government adverts), and only pay them back at a rate of about 10% of your wage so it shouldn't be an overburdening of debt.

And if it reduces the number of people going to university then that's actually a good thing - their strive to make more and more people go to uni means last year there were 42 graduates applying per job, compared to 37 last year. The degree is being devalued whilst there's much less competition over other skilled and well decently paid jobs which don't require an academic degree.
What difference does the amount of money your parents earn make when you don't have to pay untill after graduation?
0
Kurdt Morello
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#16
Report 16 years ago
#16
(Original post by Jools)
Yet another ill-informed judgement. What's discouraging people is that they don't know the facts, and think they all have to pay £3k a year... in fairness the proposals really must be spelt out in English.

Basically it's maximum £3k a year for those (parents) can afford it, if you're poor you don't have to pay squat. You only pay back the fees once you've graduated ("You don't pay zip till ur blinging" according to those awful government adverts), and only pay them back at a rate of about 10% of your wage so it shouldn't be an overburdening of debt.

And if it reduces the number of people going to university then that's actually a good thing - their strive to make more and more people go to uni means last year there were 42 graduates applying per job, compared to 37 last year. The degree is being devalued whilst there's much less competition over other skilled and well decently paid jobs which don't require an academic degree.

And universities are about to face a funding crisis - already top institutions like Durham have had to close down departments because they have no funding. How else should the Government fund education? The NUS idea of having a free grant for every student means £6.6bn a year expenditure = economic ludicracy.

At present the people who complain about £1100 tuition fees annually are the often the same ones who then boast about spending £40 in a night on booze, and spend summer dossing. Spend your vacations in paid employment and you can easily afford university. And be more prepared come graduation.
Anjool i don't know what perspective u are coming from but i can assure u that this tuition fees proposal is counter-productive with regard to higher education. First, there is no guarantee of a cap which means universities such as the Oxfords and Cambridges of this world (and perhaps to a lesser extent LSEs and UCLs) can charge over the odds for courses at their universities. Second, tuition fees are only really suitable to those who will be able to pay them off - a lot of people don't get dazzling careers after university and some are on the dole for a long time thereafter and really the govt. arent receiving those funds in those particular circumstances. Courses like Law which carry such prestige dont necessarily guarantee jobs especially in such a fiercely competitive environment - so the govt is being short changed here if there are those who arent able to pay off the debts of the fees even though they have gone to uni and got a degree. this is a drain public finances and what u could end up with iare a lot of students going to uni just to waste time instead of working - this could lead to a cull of vocational subjects and then the unis become elitist and dont give a chance to students of lesser intellect or of less privileges who werent afforded a decent education - what results - untrained workforce for the future... I assume (perhaps wrongly) that ma tay bap afforded their beta Anjool a wery good education but beware of spouting stats which bear little relation or relevance to the actual circumstances for a number of our fellow students - I thank you
0
.NK
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#17
Report 16 years ago
#17
(Original post by Harry Potter)
What difference does the amount of money your parents earn make when you don't have to pay untill after graduation?
That's what I was thinking too...!

*insert 'just because my parents have a lot of money doesn't mean they'll pay my tuition fees or give me a larger allowance' rant here*
0
MurphysMoment.
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#18
Report 16 years ago
#18
(Original post by El_Borish)
not sure about the fine details, but it was something to do with scapping tuition fees (thats the "arent we great- elect us" bit), but making it loads harder to get in, and then hiding the charges in admin costs and things like that anyway.

What the hell is wrong with that? We don't need Mickey Mouse courses and if more people can't go to university then that means degrees will be worth something again.
0
Howard
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#19
Report 16 years ago
#19
(Original post by emom100)
you've got to remember though that it isn't just the cost of the tuition costs, theres living costs. I'm no looking for accomodation out of hall for next year and they've given us a lsit of potenital outgoings and they reckon tha you need to budget for around £8000 a year where i am for hings like rent, bills, entertainment etc. Bearing in mind the max loan at the moment is £4000 is doesn't take a genius to work out there is already a hell of a deficit. My course is 4 years so if i'm going to need 8 grand a year for the next 3 i'm already going to be about £20,000 in debt. I feel so sorry for the people that are going to have to pay extra tition fees on top of that.
I think people are getting too hung up on this "debt" thing.

All debt is not the same. There is good debt and bad debt. For example, debt on your home is a good debt since it is secured (normally) to an appreciating asset. Debt on your car is bad debt since the reverse is true.

Education debt? Good debt surely since that education will (or should) enable you to earn more money and enjoy a better lifestyle and standard of living.

Look at your $20k. Presuming you are studying something that there is a need for I don't think you'll even notice paying it back over a 30-40 year working life. It's the cost of a mediocre car.

A few days ago I came accross the story of a young med student complaining that she would have a debt of $25-$30k on graduation. "Debt?" Are you kidding me? This is an investment, not a debt.
0
Bhaal85
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#20
Report 16 years ago
#20
Haven't they also said that any debts not pid back within 25 years, are 'written off'?
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (220)
68.11%
No (103)
31.89%

Watched Threads

View All