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Bigcnee
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#41
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#41
(Original post by kildare)
But the top fees will be paid by the students themselves after graduation as a percentage of their salary. Why would the income of their parents have an impact on their decision as to whether or not they should attend university?
Because the decision on contribution is based on parental income?

Because looking at the taxation of income after graduation means a sickening contribution?
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Bigcnee
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#42
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#42
(Original post by happysunshine)
1)I don't see why it should put anybody off, the poorer students pay less anyway in the end and they don't have to pay it off until they earn a reasonable amount.

2) But anyway, if they are really intelligent, they wouldn't let it put them off.
1) What would you consider a reasonable amount? What would you consider reasonable taxation?

2) What are you talking about? Money is the overriding factor!
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Kurdt Morello
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#43
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#43
(Original post by kildare)
Does it work like that though? I always thought that a graduated scale was used?
u may have a point - Bigcnee or anyone else can u confirm?
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Howard
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#44
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#44
(Original post by happysunshine)
I don't see why it should put anybody off, the poorer students pay less anyway in the end and they don't have to pay it off until they earn a reasonable amount. But anyway, if they are really intelligent, they wouldn't let it put them off.
Zut Alors! HappyS........we have common ground!!
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kildare
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#45
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#45
(Original post by Bigcnee)
Because the decision on contribution is based on parental income?
Therefore if they were from poorer familes that would pay less in the form of top up fees after graduation, no?

(Original post by Bigcnee)
Because looking at the taxation of income after graduation means a sickening contribution?
Their contribution will only be a higher proportion of their income's if they end up being poorer themselves. Why would their parents income have an effect on their future salaries?
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happysunshine
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#46
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#46
(Original post by Bigcnee)
1) What would you consider a reasonable amount? What would you consider reasonable taxation?

2) What are you talking about? Money is the overriding factor!
1) Well what is it? I just chose reasonable because I couldn't remember the exact salary when you have to start paying off your loan. Is it £15,000? I think that's reasonable, you barely have to pay much.

2) All this argument about poorer students about being put off by the money, well it's the same for every class. No one fancies getting into debt but they just weigh up the pros and cons. Trust me poorer students don't care! Surely if someone was really intelligent they would see that a degree creates more prospects.
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PQ
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#47
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#47
(Original post by Kurdt Morello)
I think it is all rather inequitable around the bottom of the scale with a matter of a few pounds making the difference between having to pay and not having to pay
So some who earns £15,000 pays nothing

Someone who earns £15,500 pays £3.75 a month

Someone who earns £20,000 pays £37.50 a month

Yes it's a graduate tax/loan but it's not an unreasonable one (compare it for example to the way my student loan has to be repaid, nothing up to £21,000 and then straight in at £90 a month...it's a %age of total earnings not earnings over the deferment value as is used in the new system).

I've benefitted hugely from my degree (even though I'm not out on an oil rig digging for oil) and hope to one day be able to pay back what I feel I've gained for nothing (ie I plan to donate money to my old university to start up a scholarship/bursary fund or if I can't afford that to donate to the university wide support system)
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Kurdt Morello
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#48
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#48
take the perspective of doctors - they train for 5 years and top up fees would really affect them quite horribly - GPs get paid a disproportionate amount for the hours they work anyway so really this isnt very fair. Also i would prefer to pay 1100p/a now compared with 3000 for every yr i am at uni - after uni i want as much of my salary so i can set myself up well for life.
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happysunshine
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#49
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#49
(Original post by Howard)
Zut Alors! HappyS........we have common ground!!
Yay!
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Bigcnee
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#50
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#50
(Original post by happysunshine)
1) Well what is it? I just chose reasonable because I couldn't remember the exact salary when you have to start paying off your loan. Is it £15,000? I think that's reasonable, you barely have to pay much.

2) All this argument about poorer students about being put off by the money, well it's the same for every class. No one fancies getting into debt but they just weigh up the pros and cons. Trust me poorer students don't care! Surely if someone was really intelligent they would see that a degree creates more prospects.
1) 42% taxation @ £15,000. Reasonable?

2) You are saying a rich family would have the same concerns about debt (an almost equal amount, at that) as a poor family?
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LH
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#51
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#51
Short of abolishing some universities, this seems the fairest system to have.
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kildare
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#52
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#52
(Original post by Kurdt Morello)
take the perspective of doctors - they train for 5 years and top up fees would really affect them quite horribly - GPs get paid a disproportionate amount for the hours they work anyway so really this isnt very fair. Also i would prefer to pay 1100p/a now compared with 3000 for every yr i am at uni - after uni i want as much of my salary so i can set myself up well for life.
Surely you're in a better position to pay the fees once you are in full time employment?
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LH
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#53
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#53
(Original post by Bigcnee)
1) 42% taxation @ £15,000. Reasonable?
I heard this is to be increased to £20,000?
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Kurdt Morello
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#54
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#54
Suppose variable top-up fees ever came into being then this would mean market forces decide which unis students go to - is that logical? Once u open the flood-gate u get swept away despite any promises made in the govt. white paper
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Bigcnee
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#55
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#55
(Original post by Pencil Queen)
So some who earns £15,000 pays nothing

Someone who earns £15,500 pays £3.75 a month

Someone who earns £20,000 pays £37.50 a month

Yes it's a graduate tax/loan but it's not an unreasonable one (compare it for example to the way my student loan has to be repaid, nothing up to £21,000 and then straight in at £90 a month...it's a %age of total earnings not earnings over the deferment value as is used in the new system).

I've benefitted hugely from my degree (even though I'm not out on an oil rig digging for oil) and hope to one day be able to pay back what I feel I've gained for nothing (ie I plan to donate money to my old university to start up a scholarship/bursary fund or if I can't afford that to donate to the university wide support system)
Where did you get this from?
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kildare
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#56
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#56
(Original post by Kurdt Morello)
Suppose variable top-up fees ever came into being then this would mean market forces decide which unis students go to - is that logical? Once u open the flood-gate u get swept away despite any promises made in the govt. white paper
It's better to deal with the facts as they are rather than make groundless assumptions. A good university would always want to take in the best students based on academic rather than monetary criteria anyway. Even if it was purely for economic reasons.
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kildare
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#57
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#57
(Original post by Bigcnee)
Where did you get this from?
Could you reply to my post? (for my own benefit)
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Kurdt Morello
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#58
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#58
(Original post by kildare)
Surely you're in a better position to pay the fees once you are in full time employment?
Yes- but surely we would rather pay less and at an earlier point so that it doesnt drain our finances when we are trying to consolidate our position in life - marriage, children, etc. are more or less part of people's lives and u need as much money as possible to fund this.
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happysunshine
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#59
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#59
(Original post by Bigcnee)
1) 42% taxation @ £15,000. Reasonable?

2) You are saying a rich family would have the same concerns about debt (an almost equal amount, at that) as a poor family?
I didn't bother reading anything about taxation. But if you'd like to tell me then that would be much appreciated!

I'm not so much talking rich, but as I'm aware a lot of middle class students will get in to debt and it's not something anyone really wants to do. The middle class start out equal with the working class after they have their have graduated ... I don't see why they should pay more.

If someone truely wants to go to university, then they will.
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kildare
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#60
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#60
(Original post by Kurdt Morello)
Yes- but surely we would rather pay less and at an earlier point so that it doesnt drain our finances when we are trying to consolidate our position in life - marriage, children, etc. are more or less part of people's lives and u need as much money as possible to fund this.
Sure you'd rather pay less, the government needs to allocate its resources to more than just universites though.
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