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    do you?
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    (Original post by a_musical_guy)
    do you?
    Hell no!
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    Nope. Honest!!!!
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    (Original post by a_musical_guy)
    do you?
    dont we all swear?
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    Yes - but I'm a proficient self-censorer
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    All the time...
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    Nope. Honest!!!!
    rollseyes and remembers a drunk bhaal*
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    Yes but i dont like to
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    I'm not perfect, rarely but on a rare occassion, don't like to.
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    Swear words are some of the most ancient words in the world, for example f**k is like from when the Romans and Britons were here...not to swear is to criticise our history....and we do an awful lot of that anyway.
    I told my friend to use the C word today when she had a lunch with the English OFSTED....lol
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    I'm an American teen, what do you expect? Hah, i don't even think about it, it just comes out at this point, you should have put another selection for the poll 100+ times a day, psh.
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    Yes, the word 'f**k' has come a long way. "fornication under the consent of king" but just for that reason, would you not consider it abuse to use the word for any reason other than what it's creators sought it to be?
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    The Short Guide to Short Words
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    (Original post by deathisg0d)
    I'm an American teen, what do you expect? Hah, i don't even think about it, it just comes out at this point, you should have put another selection for the poll 100+ times a day, psh.
    my cousins cousins live in ohio....
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    (Original post by deathisg0d)
    Yes, the word 'f**k' has come a long way. "fornication under the consent of king" but just for that reason, would you not consider it abuse to use the word for any reason other than what it's creators sought it to be?
    f**k is not an acronym. that's an urban legend
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    f**k is not an acronym. that's an urban legend
    maybe its a Suburban legend........anyway I thought it was
    For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge

    What if your a Republic and dont have a king???
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    Although this sounds like the most Anglo-Saxon of all Anglo-Saxon words, the origin of the f-word meaning 'sexual intercourse' is actually rather obscure. There is a legend that the old name for the crime of rape was 'Forced Unlawful Carnal Knowledge', and part of the punishment was that an abbreviation of the crime would be branded on the perpetrators head. Hence, people with '****' on their head were known to be rapists. A similar story is that during the time of the plague when it was necessary to increase the population a royal injunction was issued telling the common folk to 'Fornicate Under Command of the King.' These, however, would appear to be acronyms intentionally spelling out an existing word rather than new creations themselves.

    Eric Partridge, a famous etymologist, has suggested that the Old German 'ficken' or '******', meaning 'to strike or penetrate', was related to the Latin words for pugilist, puncture, and prick, or to the Latin 'futuere' which had the slang meaning 'to copulate'. There are also clearer links to Dutch where 'fokken' means breed and is applied to cattle, and to a Swedish dialect word 'fokken' which has the English meaning. Certainly, all the earliest uses of the word in English came via Scotland, suggesting a Scandinavian origin4.

    Records from as early as 1278 identify a man called John Le-****** (which, considering people often had names to do with their occupations, makes the mind boggle), and it was certainly in common usage by the 16th Century, appearing in a dictionary, John Florio's A World of Words, in 1598. By the 18th century, it had became a vulgar term; It was even banned from the Oxford English Dictionary.

    DH Lawrence's Lady Chatterly's Lover (written in 1928) was the first serious (ie non-pornographic) book in English to use the word accurately and in context and was famously banned for over thirty years. In 1960, US publishers Grove Press won a court case permitting it to publish the book in America, meaning it was the first time the word had been legally used in print, while three years later, the ban was overturned in a British court in the infamous 'Lady Chatterly trial'. American author Norman Mailer used the euphemism 'fug' in The Naked and the Dead, and when famous wit Dorothy Parker met him at a party, she said, 'So you're the young man who can't spell f***?'

    It has been recognised as one of the most versatile words in the English language, and can be put to use as an expletive, an adjective, a noun or a verb, as demonstrated in an email circular that has been widely distributed over the years.

    Poet Laureate Philip Larkin used the word in the opening lines of one of his poems, writing one of those sentences which is simple, lucid and which cannot possibly be expressed in any other way:

    'They **** you up, your Mum and Dad,
    They may not mean to, but they do'


    Kenneth Tynan the enfant terrible of mid 20th century British cultural criticism was the first person to use the word on British TV, on the BBC no less, during a live discussion programme, sparking a major and significant debate in the British press. Everyone could see what the articles were about, their eyes were drawn by the asterisks.

    The word is often shortened by Brits to just 'Eff', as in the phrase 'effing an blinding' to describe someone who swears a lot. ('Blinding' probably refers to an archaic usage 'God Blind Me' still heard in 'Cor Blimey').

    The F of the f-word also appears in various quasi-military acronyms most of which can be traced back to and may even have been spawned by the second world war. There is 'FUBBED up' - '****** Up Beyond Belief'; FUBAR - '****** Up Beyond All Recognition'; FUNDY - '****** Up, Not Dead Yet' - as used on the notes of patients in hospitals who were, well... FUNDY. There is also: 'NFW' - 'No ******* Way'; and 'SNAFU - 'Situation Normal, All ****** Up'. This last one is reputed to be the origin of 'naff', which was popularised in Britain in the 1970s programme Porridge, and reportedly used by Princess Anne5. In recent years, it has also come into gay parlance to disparagingly refer to heterosexuals - standing for 'not a ******* fairy'.

    In 1999, Conservative Future - the youth wing of the Conservative Party - started using the logo 'CFUK'. Sadly, this got them into trouble with the clothing company French Connection UK, who had recently rebranded themselves 'fcuk'. It is strange to think that there may be an entire generation who, like Norman Mailer, cannot spell the word.
    Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/alabaster/A753527 AGCB

    Mods please note this is an edited BBC website...if they're happy for the swearing in this context then maybe we can be, if not sorry for all the extra work
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    lol!!! So shall we 'fornication under the consent of king' or 'fornication under the consent of king' later?
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    lol!!! So shall we 'fornication under the consent of king' or 'fornication under the consent of king' later?

    i dont get it.....
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    (Original post by curryADD)
    i dont get it.....
    (Original post by deathisg0d)
    Yes, the word '****' has come a long way. "fornication under the consent of king" but just for that reason, would you not consider it abuse to use the word for any reason other than what it's creators sought it to be?
 
 
 
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