The Student Room Group
partenaire is feminine, I think, you can check that in a dictionary and ideal (with an accent on the e, and an e on the end if partenaire is actually feminine) should come after it.
Reply 2
ches
or ma partenaire ideal
or mon ideal partenaire
or ma ideal partenaire :confused:


idéal will always come after partnaire.

If the partner is masculine, you use mon. If the partner is feminine you use ma and you add an e to make it idéale.

so basicly....

mon partnaire idéal........ or........ ma partnaire idéale
Reply 3
garethDT
idéal will always come after partnaire.

If the partner is masculine, you use mon. If the partner is feminine you use ma and you add an e to make it idéale.

so basicly....

mon partnaire idéal........ or........ ma partnaire idéale


It doesn't matter if your ideal partner's male or female :p: In French, the gender of the noun doesn't change...so in this case it's male. (unless the noun is a title like professeur/professeure)

The correct form is "mon partenaire idéal" (you had it right in the title! :wink: )- The adjective goes after the noun in this example. Adjectives generally come after unless the adjective is small ex. "bon" or is a special case.
Reply 4
Gwen
It doesn't matter if your ideal partner's male or female :p: In French, the gender of the noun doesn't change...so in this case it's male. (unless the noun is a title like professeur/professeure)

The correct form is "mon partenaire idéal" (you had it right in the title! :wink: )- The adjective goes after the noun in this example. Adjectives generally come after unless the adjective is small ex. "bon" or is a special case.


ok, ok it was an easy mistake to make. How was I to know partnaire didn't change like friseur/friseuse or something like that
Reply 5
Gwen
It doesn't matter if your ideal partner's male or female :p: In French, the gender of the noun doesn't change...so in this case it's male. (unless the noun is a title like professeur/professeure)

The correct form is "mon partenaire idéal" (you had it right in the title! :wink: )- The adjective goes after the noun in this example. Adjectives generally come after unless the adjective is small ex. "bon" or is a special case.



I would have happily agreed with this, but checked it on

http://www.google.fr

and got about 10 million matches for une partenaire!

Personally, I don't like une prof! I learned prof as masc. invariable!

There are lots of these illogical genders, if anyone is interested, victime and sentinelle being always feminine, for example, and personne being always feminine when meaning person, and aways masculine when meaning noone...

Aitch

Perhaps native French speakers could join the thread...
Reply 6
Aitch
I would have happily agreed with this, but checked it on

http://www.google.fr

and got about 10 million matches for une partenaire!

Personally, I don't like une prof! I learned prof as masc. invariable!

There are lots of these illogical genders, if anyone is interested, victime and sentinelle being always feminine, for example, and personne being always feminine when meaning person, and aways masculine when meaning noone...

Aitch

Perhaps native French speakers could join the thread...


...and I've just remembered that the French for "The fair sex" is (of course) "Le beau sexe"... :biggrin:

Aitch
Reply 7
Aitch
I would have happily agreed with this, but checked it on

http://www.google.fr

and got about 10 million matches for une partenaire!

Personally, I don't like une prof! I learned prof as masc. invariable!

There are lots of these illogical genders, if anyone is interested, victime and sentinelle being always feminine, for example, and personne being always feminine when meaning person, and aways masculine when meaning noone...

Aitch

Perhaps native French speakers could join the thread...


French/English dictionary: partner (nm): http://fr.wordreference.com/fr/translation.asp?enfr=partner

However, I'm willing to concede that nowadays the word might also include the feminine, being pc.

As for the masculine/feminine examples, they're not illogical at all. :p: The word will usually tell you whether it's masculine or feminine depending on the ending. Personne -nne = feminine ending. Sentinelle -elle = feminine ending. There's a whole list of these, always with exceptions to every rule!