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garethDT
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#1
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I read that whole milk is supposed to be better for gaining muscle than semi skimmed, is this true or will it just make you fat? does it have a higher protein content?

also, how many grams of protein are there in a pint of milk?
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ozzy_al
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Doesn't make you fat, on the contrary. Semi-skimmed is for fools.

Google can help with the second question
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SMed
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Whole milk kicks the **** out of skimmed and semiskimmed. There's something else going on with whole milk that goes beyond the simple macronutrient content. I'll post some intriguing stuff up tomorrow that I think you'll find surprising.
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RahRah09
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WHOLE MILK FTW.

Skimmed tastes like white water, bleh.
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rocketwatch
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(Original post by RahRah09)
WHOLE MILK FTW.

Skimmed tastes like white water, bleh.
This. That is all.
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sil3nt_cha0s
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trouble is with whole milk (certainly for me), it makes me get horrible spots and acne if I drink it, even if I drink minimal quantities of it.

if it doesn't give you bad skin, certainly go for it.
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Grave
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The Amazing Health Benefits of Raw Milk

By Jo Hartley

(NaturalNews) Most people are unaware that clean, raw milk from grass-fed cows was actually used as a medicine in the early part of the 20th century. Raw milk - straight from the cow - has been called the "stem cell" of foods. It was used as medicine to treat, and many times cure, some serious diseases. From the time of Hippocrates until just after World War II, this miracle liquid nourished and healed millions.

Clean raw milk from pastured cows is a completely balanced food. You could live on it exclusively if you had to.

Raw milk ingredients that make it such a powerful food:

Proteins

Raw cow's milk has all 20 of the standard amino acids, which saves our bodies the work of having to convert any into usable form. About 80% of the proteins in milk are caseins (reasonably heat stable but easy to digest). The other 20% fall into the class of whey proteins. These are also easy to digest, but also very heat sensitive.

The immunoglobulins are an extremely complex class of milk proteins also known as antibodies. These provide resistance to many viruses, bacteria and bacterial toxins and may also help reduce the severity of asthma symptoms. Research has shown a significant loss of these important disease fighters when milk is pasteurized.

Carbohydrates

Lactose is the primary carbohydrate in cow's milk. It is made from one molecule each of the simple sugars glucose and galactose. People with lactose intolerance do not make the enzyme lactase and so cannot digest milk sugar. Raw milk has its lactose-digesting Lactobacilli bacteria intact. This may allow people who traditionally have avoided milk to drink raw milk.

Fats

About two thirds of the fat in milk is saturated. Saturated fats play a number of important roles in our bodies. They construct cell membranes and key hormones, they provide energy storage and padding for delicate organs, and they serve as a vehicle for important fat-soluble vitamins.

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) is abundant in milk from pastured cows. This is a heavily studied, polyunsaturated Omega-6 fatty acid that has promising health benefits. Some of CLA's many possible benefits are (1) it raises metabolic rates; (2) it helps remove abdominal fat; (3) it boosts muscle growth; (4) it reduces resistance to insulin; and (5) it strengthens the immune system and lowers food allergy reactions. Grass-fed raw milk has 3-5 times more CLAs than the milk from feed-lot cows.

Vitamins

Whole raw milk has both water and fat soluble vitamins. No enriching is necessary. It's a complete food. Pasteurized milk must have the destroyed components added back in, especially the fat soluble vitamins A and D.

Minerals

Raw milk contains a broad selection of minerals ranging from calcium and phosphorus to trace elements.

Calcium is abundant in raw milk. Its benefits include a reduction of some cancers, particularly colon; higher bone density in people of all ages; lower risk of osteoporosis in older adults; lowered risk of kidney stones; the formation of strong teeth; as well as a reduction of dental cavities.

An interesting fact about minerals as nutrients is the special balance they require with other minerals to function properly. For example, calcium needs a proper ratio of phosphorus and magnesium to be properly utilized by our bodies. Raw milk is in perfect balance.

Enzymes

The 60 functional enzymes in raw milk have an amazing assortment of jobs to perform. Some of them are native to milk and some come from beneficial bacteria growing in raw milk. When we eat food that contains enzymes devoted to its own digestion, it's less work for our pancreas. Other enzymes, like catalase, lysozyme and lactoperoxidase help to protect milk from unwanted bacterial infection, making it safer for us to drink.

Cholesterol

Milk contains about 3mg of cholesterol per gram. Our bodies make most of the cholesterol we need. This amount fluctuates by what we get from our food. Cholesterol is a repair substance. It is a waxy plant steroid that our body uses as a form of water-proofing and as a building block for key hormones.

Beneficial Bacteria

Raw milk is a living food with amazing self-protective properties. As most food goes bad as it ages, raw milk gets better. From helpful bacterial fermentation, the digestibility of enzymes, vitamins, and minerals all increases.

Today, the demand for raw milk from pasture-fed cattle is growing as word spreads of the tremendous health benefits of drinking raw milk. Those who want information can go to the following websites:

(www.realmilk.com)

(www.westonaprice.org)

Sales of raw milk are currently legal in 28 out of 50 US states. Specific information for each state can be found here: (http://www.realmilk.com/happening.html) .

Taken from http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_t..._of_whole_milk

Therefore, Whole milk wins.
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Redreynard
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skimmed milk tastes like white water. so no good.
full milk furs up your arteries. so not ideal.
semi-skimmed seems to me to be the perfect compromise. :-)
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Friar Chris
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Semi-skimmed. Glug glug . Not too creamy, not too thin.
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Mr Paradox
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http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/res...ch-review.html

http://stronglifts.com/milk-post-wor...-muscle-gains/

Can't find the actual study which shows whole milk having a superior effect to skimmed on protein synthesis post workout despite the higher fat content. Whole milk is God tier
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cowsforsale
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I remember i was queuing up, waiting to buy a litre of whole milk in the student union when I overhead these girls walk past me and say " I can only drink skimmed milk because semi - skimmed makes me so fat ". :sigh:
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SMed
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(Original post by Redreynard)
skimmed milk tastes like white water. so no good.
full milk furs up your arteries. so not ideal.
semi-skimmed seems to me to be the perfect compromise. :-)
Come again?
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SMed
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(Original post by Mr Paradox)
http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/res...ch-review.html

http://stronglifts.com/milk-post-wor...-muscle-gains/

Can't find the actual study which shows whole milk having a superior effect to skimmed on protein synthesis post workout despite the higher fat content. Whole milk is God tier
Yeah that's the one. The interesting part being, that even when matched for calories, whole milk was better. Think about that, if you match the calories of whole and skimmed (I know we're talking about semi here, but the principal still stands), you have to significantly increase the volume of skimmed milk to get the same calories as whole milk. That means much more carbs and much more protein in the skimmed, YET STILL the whole milk was superior to skimmed, despite having less protein and carbs.

So 1000kcal of whole milk IS better than 1000kcal of skimmed milk.
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Redreynard
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(Original post by SMed)
Come again?

when i said that full-fat milk furs up your arteries, i meant that the fat in milk, like all fat, furs up your arteries. and can lead to early death.
milk has a lot of fat in it as it is designed to turn a calf into a cow.
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SMed
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(Original post by Redreynard)
when i said that full-fat milk furs up your arteries, i meant that the fat in milk, like all fat, furs up your arteries. and can lead to early death.
This is pretty much all wrong.
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Libtolu
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(Original post by garethDT)
I read that whole milk is supposed to be better for gaining muscle than semi skimmed, is this true or will it just make you fat? does it have a higher protein content?

also, how many grams of protein are there in a pint of milk?
If you're looking to gain muscle like a power lifter than yes it is good but you will most likely gain some fat as well because it is sort of a dirty bulk but really who cares powerlifters can eat anything so its all good however if you want to clean bulk i would stick to semi skimmed, less cream less fat so you wont have to cut as much if that's what your into
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Libtolu
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(Original post by SMed)
This is pretty much all wrong.
i stand by semi skimmed really only because i have to watch my weight and for me because of the lower calories i can drink more.


Quantity over quality :yep:
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SMed
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I probably wouldn't drink too much milk if I was dieting down and trying to lean out. I'd drink some if I was maintaining, but I'd still only drink whole milk. For mass/strength gains, I'd drink more whole milk.

I dropped 3kg (without exercising) in 5-6 weeks, brought my a little of my abs in, and was drinking a litre of Gold Top milk (even more fat than blue top whole milk). My overall calorie and macro amounts were sound, and I enjoyed the taste of the creamier milk.

I'm not saying everyone should be doing that, because even for me there was a slight increase in mucus secretion. Milk doesn't cause my skin to break out, but if it did (and it does in a lot of people), I'd be less inclined to drink it. I don't get diarrhoea, even when doing GOMAD, but a lot of people do.

There's been some good research done that has repeatedly shown complete whole milk is superior to whey in isolation and/or casein in isolation.
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Nizzay!
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Whole Milk gives me gas unfortunatley.
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najinaji
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I slightly prefer semi-skimmed. I think it's probably because I'm used to it, however.
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