16 year olds should have the vote! Watch

This discussion is closed.
Tek
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#41
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#41
(Original post by MadNatSci)
You can only get married with your parents' permission, technically, so no - it isn't adulthood. Your parents are still responsible for you.

I don't think 16 year-olds in general would be mature enough to vote. As I think Sire said, 16 is still an age where kids are generally very impressionable and will do anything to make sure they fit in with their peers. I'm not saying anything about you two, Tek or happysunshine, because there are always exceptions and I'm sure you two are exceptions. But I suspect that many 16 year-olds - certainly amongst the ones I know - would vote the way their friends did without really thinking about it, and in that case there really isn't much point. It's frustrating but then life's frustrating - you might as well get used to it
(Original post by Tek)
It is surely a simple concept to understand: if you are old enough to pay taxes, then it is your democratic right to be allowed to vote. Regardless of any issues concerning your intellect or your maturity, which I note DO NOT apply to anyone over 18, regardless of how clever you are or how mature you are, if you are old enough to live and work in society then you are old enough to vote!
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#42
Report 16 years ago
#42
(Original post by MadNatSci)
You can only get married with your parents' permission, technically, so no - it isn't adulthood. Your parents are still responsible for you.

I don't think 16 year-olds in general would be mature enough to vote. As I think Sire said, 16 is still an age where kids are generally very impressionable and will do anything to make sure they fit in with their peers. I'm not saying anything about you two, Tek or happysunshine, because there are always exceptions and I'm sure you two are exceptions. But I suspect that many 16 year-olds - certainly amongst the ones I know - would vote the way their friends did without really thinking about it, and in that case there really isn't much point. It's frustrating but then life's frustrating - you might as well get used to it
But like I keep saying we should give 16 year olds the oppertunity if they want it. If other 16 year olds don't want to vote, they don't have to. I have to wait until I'm 21 to vote with the current laws.
0
LH
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#43
Report 16 years ago
#43
(Original post by MadNatSci)
You can only get married with your parents' permission, technically, so no - it isn't adulthood. Your parents are still responsible for you.
You can get married without their consent in Scotland!
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#44
Report 16 years ago
#44
(Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
You can get married without their consent in Scotland!
I hate the way there are different ages until you become adult. It's all just to suit the company or the government so they can get more money out of you.
0
MadNatSci
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#45
Report 16 years ago
#45
Yes, you posted that while I was busy typing so I didn't have a chance to argue with it! Basically - yes, there are immature 18 year olds. But a line has to be drawn somewhere. I know some immature eighteen year olds. I also know some hugely mature, well-adjusted and knowledgeable fourteen year olds. Yes, sixteen year olds can pay taxes (although how much tax do you pay?). It does seem a little unfair that these tax-paying youngsters can't vote. But a line has to be drawn, as I said, and you ARE still technically a child until you're 18. It doesn't matter whether you have a job or not - the law sees you as a child!

edit: was speaking to Tek, couldn't quote him
0
MadNatSci
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#46
Report 16 years ago
#46
(Original post by happysunshine)
I hate the way there are different ages until you become adult. It's all just to suit the company or the government so they can get more money out of you.

Yep. That about sums it up.
0
LH
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#47
Report 16 years ago
#47
(Original post by happysunshine)
I hate the way there are different ages until you become adult. It's all just to suit the company or the government so they can get more money out of you.
According to the Alton Towers fee system, you're an adult at about seven.

The same is true with cinemas. If you can't see an adult film, why do you have to pay adult prices!
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#48
Report 16 years ago
#48
(Original post by MadNatSci)
Yes, you posted that while I was busy typing so I didn't have a chance to argue with it! Basically - yes, there are immature 18 year olds. But a line has to be drawn somewhere. I know some immature eighteen year olds. I also know some hugely mature, well-adjusted and knowledgeable fourteen year olds. Yes, sixteen year olds can pay taxes (although how much tax do you pay?). It does seem a little unfair that these tax-paying youngsters can't vote. But a line has to be drawn, as I said, and you ARE still technically a child until you're 18. It doesn't matter whether you have a job or not - the law sees you as a child!

edit: was speaking to Tek, couldn't quote him
The law sees you as a child at different ages just to suit them. I couldn't care less if someone is too imature, they still have views and should be able to vote for a poltical party who represents their views. The line should be drawn at 16. If you are an technically an adult at 18, you shouldn't be able to have sex.
0
s.ahmad3
Badges: 0
#49
Report 16 years ago
#49
i think that 16 year olds should be given the vote. Yes they are immature, but i think this is a product of society; they are deemed children, so they continue to behave like children. In the days when 14 year olds used to work in coal mines etc, i bet you the 16 year olds of the day were very mature, knowing and experiencing the harsh realities of the world.
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#50
Report 16 years ago
#50
(Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
According to the Alton Towers fee system, you're an adult at about seven.

The same is true with cinemas. If you can't see an adult film, why do you have to pay adult prices!
I know! It's so wrong. We don't even get adult wages at 15 to pay adult prices.
0
MadNatSci
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#51
Report 16 years ago
#51
(Original post by happysunshine)
I know! It's so wrong. We don't even get adult wages at 15 to pay adult prices.

Actually, surely it would make more economic sense to charge adults (say classing adults as over 25) less and kids more, since the adults are unlikely to use as many rides - well, I know my parents wouldn't anyway
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#52
Report 16 years ago
#52
(Original post by MadNatSci)
Actually, surely it would make more economic sense to charge adults (say classing adults as over 25) less and kids more, since the adults are unlikely to use as many rides - well, I know my parents wouldn't anyway
Well it would make sense... but it wouldn't be right!

Can I just add if a 16 year old was so imature they wouldn't vote or take any interest in politics!
0
MadNatSci
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#53
Report 16 years ago
#53
(Original post by happysunshine)
Well it would make sense... but it wouldn't be right!

Can I just add if a 16 year old was so imature they wouldn't vote or take any interest in politics!
Firstly - why wouldn't the Alton towers thing be right? You have two parents and two kids. The parents pay £20 each to get in, then spend the day killing time by walking around the gardens. The kids pay less (OK, their parents pay for them but it's the principle of the thing!) and then use all the rides. This is how our family visits to Alton Towers always were...


OK, using a bunch of 16 year olds I know as an example. I know them well enough to be absolutely certain that they would vote because 'hey, it's cool, we can vote', and would vote for whichever party happened to be socially acceptable. They wouldn't take any interest in the real politics so they wouldn't really know anything about the parties' policies, they would vote for the party everyone else was voting for. Which is hardly democratic. I am sure this probably does happen on occasion with older people, but the thing is that you cannot lower the voting age indefinitely - and using the argument given above you could allow people to vote from the minute they were born!
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#54
Report 16 years ago
#54
(Original post by MadNatSci)
Firstly - why wouldn't the Alton towers thing be right? You have two parents and two kids. The parents pay £20 each to get in, then spend the day killing time by walking around the gardens. The kids pay less (OK, their parents pay for them but it's the principle of the thing!) and then use all the rides. This is how our family visits to Alton Towers always were...


OK, using a bunch of 16 year olds I know as an example. I know them well enough to be absolutely certain that they would vote because 'hey, it's cool, we can vote', and would vote for whichever party happened to be socially acceptable. They wouldn't take any interest in the real politics so they wouldn't really know anything about the parties' policies, they would vote for the party everyone else was voting for. Which is hardly democratic. I am sure this probably does happen on occasion with older people, but the thing is that you cannot lower the voting age indefinitely - and using the argument given above you could allow people to vote from the minute they were born!
LOL it would be fine for Alton Towers when you are off with a young family. But it isn't very nice for the 14 year old who has to pay £20 to get in when they aren't on an adult salary.

Well if they don't know enough about politics then shouldn't they be taught about it at school? Wouldn't a few 16 year olds take a bit more of an interest when they know they could vote?
0
*dave*
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#55
Report 16 years ago
#55
There has to be an identifyable line between adulthood and childhood. It would be impossibly complicated if it was based on individuals.

Tek - The VAST majority of 16 year olds don't pay tax ... and on the whole 16 year olds are far too immature to have a vote. When you are 18, I think you will understand that 16 is too young. 16 year olds aren't even allowed to buy alcohol, surely voting is a far more responsible job than buying alcohol.
0
Matt the cat
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#56
Report 16 years ago
#56
(Original post by *dave*)
When you are 18, I think you will understand that 16 is too young.
I agree completly
0
jediknight007
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#57
Report 16 years ago
#57
(Original post by Tek)
16 Year olds: Should they be allowed to vote?

Yes
  • "No taxation without representation". If we are old enough to pay taxes, it is surely our demoractic right to vote!
  • If we are mature enough to marry, we are mature enough to vote.
No they shouldn't. Be a good boy and wait another 2 years for your go.

This is just me yea, I'm 18 but I don't feel ready to vote yet. When you think back to 16, the end of the secondary school era, you will realise how immature you were compared to now. Believe me, it's the truth. Anyways, enough of me blabbering....
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#58
Report 16 years ago
#58
(Original post by jediknight007)
No they shouldn't. Be a good boy and wait another 2 years for your go.

This is just me yea, I'm 18 but I don't feel ready to vote yet. When you think back to 16, the end of the secondary school era, you will realise how immature you were compared to now. Believe me, it's the truth. Anyways, enough of me blabbering....
So! You still have an oppinion! I wish people would stop making out that 16 year olds still attend playgroup.
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (388)
67.24%
No (189)
32.76%

Watched Threads

View All