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    Basically, my GCSEs were crap: A*AAAAABBBCCCE.
    My AS results were alright, I guess, although I could've done better:
    English: A
    Psychology: A
    History: B (missed A by three marks! I'm re-taking it in January)
    Art: B

    My predicted grades are A*AA (I dropped Art, thanks God).

    I've been in England for only three years though, I came in year 10 with basically no English whatsoever, and the A* I am predicted is, ironically, for English.
    Can someone please tell me if there's actually a point in applying to study law at LSE? I'm kind of worried of not getting in anywhere I am applying to.. which is Queen Mary's, Reading, Brunel and Westminster. The last two are only back up choices, just in case I actually really screw up.
    Oh, and I'm not doing LNAT - simply because I wanted to study History all my life, and then convert, but recently I've been told that conversion is a REALLY hard and long process.
    No work experience in Law either.
    Anyone? X
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    (Original post by ilovepolska)
    Basically, my GCSEs were crap: A*AAAAABBBCCCE.
    My AS results were alright, I guess, although I could've done better:
    English: A
    Psychology: A
    History: B (missed A by three marks! I'm re-taking it in January)
    Art: B

    My predicted grades are A*AA (I dropped Art, thanks God).

    I've been in England for only three years though, I came in year 10 with basically no English whatsoever, and the A* I am predicted is, ironically, for English.
    Can someone please tell me if there's actually a point in applying to study law at LSE? I'm kind of worried of not getting in anywhere I am applying to.. which is Queen Mary's, Reading, Brunel and Westminster. The last two are only back up choices, just in case I actually really screw up.
    Oh, and I'm not doing LNAT - simply because I wanted to study History all my life, and then convert, but recently I've been told that conversion is a REALLY hard and long process.
    No work experience in Law either.
    Anyone? X
    I know that you've got mitigating circumstances, but LSE are serious GCSE nazis. I'm not so sure if it'd be a good idea for you to apply there. :erm:
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    I study at LSE currently.

    I'm afraid to say that, unless if those are IGCSEs, you have no chance, particularly because no other part of your application seems strong either (you don't seem to have a genuine academic interest in law, you don't have any work experience and your AS results + subjects are relatively weak).

    I do sympathise with the fact that you've only been in England for 3 years, but I think it's better that I tell you that you have no chance than give you false hope. I hope my words don't come off too harshly and you can appreciate the advice. An option might be to take a gap year and apply with strong A-levels + some work experience lined up for that gap year, but even then your chances don't get boosted enough to stand a warrant taking a whole year out. However, I believe it would significantly increase your chances for other decent universities, but only do it if you're guaranteed law work experience in that gap year + still apply this year anyway to see what happens.
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    converting isn't hard! It's just a 1 year course, the GDL (google it). You can apply for a training contract before you decide to convert, if you get one the law firm will pay your GDL fees (and the fees for the LPC/BVC, which law grads have to take to) and give you £5000-£7000 maintenance grant (non repayable!) for both years of law school.
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    (Original post by Swayum)
    I study at LSE currently.

    I'm afraid to say that, unless if those are IGCSEs, you have no chance, particularly because no other part of your application seems strong either (you don't seem to have a genuine academic interest in law, you don't have any work experience and your AS results + subjects are relatively weak).

    I do sympathise with the fact that you've only been in England for 3 years, but I think it's better that I tell you that you have no chance than give you false hope. I hope my words don't come off too harshly and you can appreciate the advice.
    N'aaaaw, don't worry dear.
    I totally get your point, and thanks by the way!
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    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    converting isn't hard! It's just a 1 year course, the GDL (google it). You can apply for a training contract before you decide to convert, if you get one the law firm will pay your GDL fees (and the fees for the LPC/BVC, which law grads have to take to) and give you £5000-£7000 maintenance grant (non repayable!) for both years of law school.
    You know what, I think I might actually re-write my personal statement tonight and apply to do history instead..
    The only thing that kinda confuses me - how to I get a law firm to pay for my GDL? Thanks x
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    (Original post by Swayum)
    I study at LSE currently.

    I'm afraid to say that, unless if those are IGCSEs, you have no chance, particularly because no other part of your application seems strong either (you don't seem to have a genuine academic interest in law, you don't have any work experience and your AS results + subjects are relatively weak).

    I do sympathise with the fact that you've only been in England for 3 years, but I think it's better that I tell you that you have no chance than give you false hope. I hope my words don't come off too harshly and you can appreciate the advice. An option might be to take a gap year and apply with strong A-levels + some work experience lined up for that gap year, but even then your chances don't get boosted enough to stand a warrant taking a whole year out. However, I believe it would significantly increase your chances for other decent universities, but only do it if you're guaranteed law work experience in that gap year + still apply this year anyway to see what happens.
    May I ask why you studied at the OU? And why you applied twice? Your grades are pretty impressive tbh!
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    (Original post by ilovepolska)
    You know what, I think I might actually re-write my personal statement tonight and apply to do history instead..
    The only thing that kinda confuses me - how to I get a law firm to pay for my GDL? Thanks x
    Go for it!

    If you are going the solicitor route, and apply for a training contract before you finish your degree, then most of the big firms will fund your further training (GDL/LPC) and even pay a maintenance grant on top.
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    (Original post by ilovepolska)
    You know what, I think I might actually re-write my personal statement tonight and apply to do history instead..
    The only thing that kinda confuses me - how to I get a law firm to pay for my GDL? Thanks x
    Basically you apply for training contracts in your third year of uni (law students do it at the end of your 2nd year).

    If you are succesful in winning a training contract at a big firm (most city firms, some non city firms offer sponsorship too), part of the contract offer is usually that they'll pay your fees + give you a grant. After the GDL and LPC, you then do your 2 year training contract with the firm (you get paid then, it's a real job!) lol.

    That's for a solicitor - barristers are less likely to be sponsored but I'm not sure exactly how the barrister route works, look in the legal forum for more help.

    Great websites - you should definitely read them before applying, whether you apply for history or law!

    http://l2b.thelawyer.com/useful-reso...tors-timeline/

    http://www.centaur2.co.uk/emags/thel...rs_guide_2009/

    http://www.lawbritannia.co.uk/How2.htm

    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/becomingasolicitor.law


    If you really want to do a history degree, do it! Spending an extra year (well 9 months of study plus a long summer off!) doing the LPC is nothing - you'll be working for 40 years, may as well have a year extra being a student! Also your passion for the subject will definitely help you get into uni, plus it will get you more involved with the degree, you'll be more keen to really do well in your exams and essays so you'll be more motivated to get higher marks, and you'll pick up vital transferable skills to talk about on your application forms and at interviews. 50% of new lawyers did a non-law degree, it's not like you'll be the only one!
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    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    Basically you apply for training contracts in your third year of uni (law students do it at the end of your 2nd year).

    If you are succesful in winning a training contract at a big firm (most city firms, some non city firms offer sponsorship too), part of the contract offer is usually that they'll pay your fees + give you a grant. After the GDL and LPC, you then do your 2 year training contract with the firm (you get paid then, it's a real job!) lol.

    That's for a solicitor - barristers are less likely to be sponsored but I'm not sure exactly how the barrister route works, look in the legal forum for more help.

    Great websites - you should definitely read them before applying, whether you apply for history or law!

    http://l2b.thelawyer.com/useful-reso...tors-timeline/

    http://www.centaur2.co.uk/emags/thel...rs_guide_2009/

    http://www.lawbritannia.co.uk/How2.htm

    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/becomingasolicitor.law


    If you really want to do a history degree, do it! Spending an extra year (well 9 months of study plus a long summer off!) doing the LPC is nothing - you'll be working for 40 years, may as well have a year extra being a student! Also your passion for the subject will definitely help you get into uni, plus it will get you more involved with the degree, you'll be more keen to really do well in your exams and essays so you'll be more motivated to get higher marks, and you'll pick up vital transferable skills to talk about on your application forms and at interviews. 50% of new lawyers did a non-law degree, it's not like you'll be the only one!
    Thanks! That's REALLY helpful, I'm actually writing my new personal statement now.
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    (Original post by ilovepolska)
    Basically, my GCSEs were crap: A*AAAAABBBCCCE.
    My AS results were alright, I guess, although I could've done better:
    English: A
    Psychology: A
    History: B (missed A by three marks! I'm re-taking it in January)
    Art: B

    My predicted grades are A*AA (I dropped Art, thanks God).

    I've been in England for only three years though, I came in year 10 with basically no English whatsoever, and the A* I am predicted is, ironically, for English.
    Can someone please tell me if there's actually a point in applying to study law at LSE? I'm kind of worried of not getting in anywhere I am applying to.. which is Queen Mary's, Reading, Brunel and Westminster. The last two are only back up choices, just in case I actually really screw up.
    Oh, and I'm not doing LNAT - simply because I wanted to study History all my life, and then convert, but recently I've been told that conversion is a REALLY hard and long process.
    No work experience in Law either.
    Anyone? X
    Hi,

    If I was you I would not apply to LSE, since last year they gave offers for Law to people who got 11 a stars or more, and 4 a's at a level. As well as predicted more than 2 a stars at A2.
 
 
 
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