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    Hi all,

    I'm an 18 year old male, 5'2 and currently weigh 72.5Kg (Starting weight 74Kg)

    I'm very overweight, so I wanted to do something about it.

    2 Weeks ago I gave up chocolate/sweets/desserts and the past 3 days I have been going for a 2km walk/run every night after dinner. All this on top of a 2 meal - just over 1200 calorie day.

    If any of you have any comments or suggestions, I'd be happy to hear them as I'm no expert on losing weight. (I've been overweight since I was about 12)
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    If you're doing a lot of exercise then it's important to maintain a 3000-a-day calorie intake, and make sure you eat plenty of protein.

    When you're exercising your body uses sugars, fats and proteins for respiration. This means if you don't each enough starchy food then a greater proportion of the metabolites used are fats and protein. If you exercise with a low calorie intake then you'll lose weight quickly, but also lots of muscle mass. If you don't have a lot of muscle under your excess fat then the places it'll come from will be airways walls and cardiac muscle, which increases the risk of heart attack massively.

    Exercise should ALWAYS be accompanied by a healthy, balanced diet. If you're unsure how best to go about losing weight safely then see your GP and they'll help you work out a plan or refer you to someone who can
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    I personally would find it impossible to eat 3000 calories a day!

    OP maybe you could join a slimming group is this overweight issue is long term?

    ...or request this be moved over to fitness?
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    (Original post by tommy5x)
    If you're doing a lot of exercise then it's important to maintain a 3000-a-day calorie intake, and make sure you eat plenty of protein.

    When you're exercising your body uses sugars, fats and proteins for respiration. This means if you don't each enough starchy food then a greater proportion of the metabolites used are fats and protein. If you exercise with a low calorie intake then you'll lose weight quickly, but also lots of muscle mass. If you don't have a lot of muscle under your excess fat then the places it'll come from will be airways walls and cardiac muscle, which increases the risk of heart attack massively.

    Exercise should ALWAYS be accompanied by a healthy, balanced diet. If you're unsure how best to go about losing weight safely then see your GP and they'll help you work out a plan or refer you to someone who can
    Absolute rubbish.

    To lose a pound of fat, you've got to get 3500 calories from somewhere, right? Your suggesting OP ADDS an extra 500 calories on? Dear god.

    OP. At this stage, just go for fat loss. Looking at your stats, you must be like a moon, just get on the treadmill and go for a run.

    Find your BMR, and subtract 500 calories from that, that's how many calories you should be eating, approx, a day.
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    (Original post by Oh_Mighty_One)
    Absolute rubbish.

    To lose a pound of fat, you've got to get 3500 calories from somewhere, right? Your suggesting OP ADDS an extra 500 calories on? Dear god.

    OP. At this stage, just go for fat loss. Looking at your stats, you must be like a moon, just get on the treadmill and go for a run.

    Find your BMR, and subtract 500 calories from that, that's how many calories you should be eating, approx, a day.
    This is within the context of his current size, though having reread his post and noted his height, 3000 was rather over-generous. If he has little/no skeletal muscle then he has to maintain a high intake of starch-rich foods because otherwise he'll lose cardiac muscle which is dangerous. If he wanted to go purely for fat loss then he'd eat nothing but protein and fibrous vegetables, drink nothing but isotonic water and exercise as much as he could manage. When you're as overweight as the OP what's most important is to build up to a reasonable level of fitness by eating and exercising responsibly and then worry about fat loss and muscle gain.

    What I say to you OP is maintain a diet which matches your RDAs. Doing gentle, non-impact exercise (swimming would be excellent at this stage) and eating a balanced diet will increase your fitness levels and you'll lose some fat anyway. It is far healthier in the long term to lose weight by exercising more and eating well than to crash diet.
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    (Original post by DlightSwitch)
    So if everything you said is correct, why do people 'diet' ?
    Because they're looking for a short-term solution to a long term problem. They're doing it wrong.
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    I'm not saying eat a ton, I'm saying make sure you eat enough. You'll lose fat less quickly but you'll be healthier in the long term, which is more important.
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    Speaking from experience Tommy, I have to disagree. While I do agree with your point about eating enough, you still need to make that calorie deficit. OP is quite overweight. I think gaining muscle at the present time is the least of OP's worries. At the moment, i really honestly do think it would be beneficial for OP to just concentrate on fat loss, and then, in accordance with his height, when he gets down to say, 65-67kg, then start worrying about muscle gain.

    The formula for fat loss it easy. Eat less + Exercise = Fat loss. I can vouch for that 100%
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    It's not the least of his worries if it avoids long term harm; not to mention that extra muscle mass generally correlates with an increased rate of metabolism. the more muscle you have, the easier it tends to be to lose fat.

    Eat less + exercise is also the recipe for loss of non-skeletal muscle if his nutrition isn't adequate. I want to be perfectly clear that what I'm saying only applies if, as I said before, OP is both extremely unfit and has near no skeletal muscle. If either of those conditions is not the case then go for fat loss using primarily aerobic exercises.
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    I think we may need a third opinion..
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    I used to be really fat as well. Something that you should know about is how the human metabolism works. Basically, the traditional day for 99% of the country is wake up, breakfast, work/school, lunch, more work/school, dinner, and possibly a supper and snacks ****** in there. This is bad. When you eat a big meal, the metabolism slows down; the body thinks that it has to survive over a period without food.

    I won't go into lots of details in that, but feel free to Google what I'm talking about.

    So, basically, you eat 5 meals a day, but less in size than a regular portion. This keeps the metabolism burning all day, and in a couple of weeks it should be used to it; throw in daily exercise in there and you will lose weight in no time.

    It worked for me:

    - When I was 12 I was 13 stone.
    - I am 16 now and am 11 stone.
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    (Original post by tommy5x)
    It's not the least of his worries if it avoids long term harm; not to mention that extra muscle mass generally correlates with an increased rate of metabolism. the more muscle you have, the easier it tends to be to lose fat.
    The benefits of gaining muscle to lose fat are vastly over exaggerated.

    To burn an extra 50 calories per day you'd need to gain at least 10lbs of muscle which the vast majority of people will never achieve, even on a dedicated muscle gaining diet and exercise routine.

    Eat less + exercise is also the recipe for loss of non-skeletal muscle if his nutrition isn't adequate.
    That being the most important phrase.

    Rather than advising an already overweight person to get progressively more overweight how about we give them some decent diet and exercise advice?

    When you're exercising your body uses sugars, fats and proteins for respiration. This means if you don't each enough starchy food then a greater proportion of the metabolites used are fats and protein.
    Which is exactly what he should be aiming for given that he is overweight and has a high bodyfat percentage.

    Yes, invariably when you lose weight you will lose some protein and/or muscle, however, this can be greatly reduced by eating properly (ie; plenty of decent sources of protein, plenty of decent fats, plenty of vegetables, moderate-low consumption of carbs, little or no processed food), training intelligently (ie; strength training and cardio/intervals/HIIT/circuits) and losing weight gradually (ie; 1-2lbs per week MAX).

    If you exercise with a low calorie intake then you'll lose weight quickly, but also lots of muscle mass. If you don't have a lot of muscle under your excess fat then the places it'll come from will be airways walls and cardiac muscle, which increases the risk of heart attack massively.
    Alarmist to say the least - what you're talking about is starvation not sensible weight loss via a decent diet and exercise regime.

    (Original post by kRaeTwin)
    I used to be really fat as well. Something that you should know about is how the human metabolism works. Basically, the traditional day for 99% of the country is wake up, breakfast, work/school, lunch, more work/school, dinner, and possibly a supper and snacks ****** in there. This is bad. When you eat a big meal, the metabolism slows down; the body thinks that it has to survive over a period without food.

    ...

    So, basically, you eat 5 meals a day, but less in size than a regular portion. This keeps the metabolism burning all day...
    Myth.

    The thermic effect of feeding (ie; the calories burned via digestion, metabolism, etc of food) is around 10% and this does not change with meal frequency (ie; 10% of 2500 calories is still 250 calories whether that's spread across 3 meals or 20).

    It may better regulate blood sugar levels and it may mean that you snack less but the emphasis is on "may". If you managed to lose weight it was almost certainly by other means (ie; exercising more, eating better, eating slightly less, etc).

    I won't go into lots of details in that, but feel free to Google what I'm talking about.
    Please do because there is absolutely no evidence which supports it.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi all,

    I'm an 18 year old male, 5'2 and currently weigh 72.5Kg (Starting weight 74Kg)

    I'm very overweight, so I wanted to do something about it.

    2 Weeks ago I gave up chocolate/sweets/desserts and the past 3 days I have been going for a 2km walk/run every night after dinner. All this on top of a 2 meal - just over 1200 calorie day.

    If any of you have any comments or suggestions, I'd be happy to hear them as I'm no expert on losing weight. (I've been overweight since I was about 12)
    Your on the right track thats for sure. I know this because you've started a thread about losing weight and it contains more focus on nutritional information instead of actual exercise. well done for that.

    At present I don't think you need much help. Continue with good eating but eat small meals more offen and execise / push yourself / move more offen.

    It' won't get any eaiser but you'll get there in the end and it'll be worth it.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    The benefits of...which supports it.
    I agree with almost everything you've said, though what I mean with regards more muscle/easier weightloss was masked by my own poor phrasing, I apologise for that. What I mean is that in addition to the metabolic correlation (admittedly minor,) having a better level of fitness before beginning to try and lose fat makes subsequent exercise easier.

    His post stated he was eating 1200 calories a day which is very low even for a relatively sendantry person, let alone somebody doing daily exercise with no other detail of diet. You seem to be accusing me of contradicting advice about maintaining a good diet (my first post had a calorie value error which I later rescinded,) which is the opposite of the case.

    I do not contend that he needs to aim to lose fats, but it is a biological fact that sugars, lipids and proteins are metabolised at the same time and that somebody with little skeletal muscle does not want to have it lost from elsewhere: I have seen people crash diet and suffer from it without starving themselves, but by overexerting themselves and not adequately npourishing themselves. All of my advice has been given in a specific context because OPs details were lacking, and I have been clear on that the whole time.
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    (Original post by DlightSwitch)
    Thanks for your support. The exercise is the easy part, simply doing cardio and burning calories. Nutrition is definitely harder, and I am trying my best to stick to a good, balanced diet.
    Nutrtion part is definitely the most beneficial part, as without it you would be spinning your wheels.

    Your exercise isn't just as simple as 'cardio' and 'burning calories' so to say. You want to be looking into Energy System Training (EST), both Neural and Metabolic training methods. - Starting to sound not so simple?

    Simply because you want the most effective way to maximise your fat loss to get lean.

    An intelligently designed weight training regimen should be the cornerstone of your fat loss program. While both intervals and steady state types of cardio have their pros and cons, the best game plan is to incorporate both alongside in a holistic and balanced training program.
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    (Original post by tommy5x)
    I agree with almost everything you've said, though what I mean with regards more muscle/easier weightloss was masked by my own poor phrasing, I apologise for that. What I mean is that in addition to the metabolic correlation (admittedly minor,) having a better level of fitness before beginning to try and lose fat makes subsequent exercise easier.
    Exercise is not a particularly effective means of losing weight full stop - you cannot out train a poor diet and the vast majority of people will find it easier to clean up their diet than go balls to the wall in the gym for a couple of hours every day.

    Gaining muscle and being fitter are two completely different things and their role in weight loss is minimal. Sure being fitter may enable you to work harder and/or longer, then again you could just condense your workouts and eat better for much the same results.

    If you think about it many overweight people are carrying around a fair amount of excess weight and so it is possible for them to have a higher metabolic rate and calorie expenditure than someone who is lighter/fitter than them.

    You seem to be accusing me of contradicting advice about maintaining a good diet (my first post had a calorie value error which I later rescinded,) which is the opposite of the case.
    The problem is that you don't seem to appreciate how rarely cardiac muscle degeneration occurs or how easily it can be avoided. Likewise your phobia of this happening is clouding your judgement (ie; eat lots of starchy carbohydrates, drinking lots of isotonic water, 3000 cal diet, etc).

    I do not contend that he needs to aim to lose fats, but it is a biological fact that sugars, lipids and proteins are metabolised at the same time and that somebody with little skeletal muscle does not want to have it lost from elsewhere:
    We aren't talking about someone who has experienced chronic malnutrition or starvation (quite the opposite in fact) so the likelihood that fat loss will endanger his health is extremely unrealistic. Likewise as I've said already a good diet (ie; healthy eating alongside a small calorie deficit) and decent exercise regime will hugely limit muscle loss and enhance fat loss.

    I have seen people crash diet and suffer from it without starving themselves, but by overexerting themselves and not adequately npourishing themselves.
    Cutting your calorific intake drastically and exercising excessively is starving yourself and it is not something anyone has proposed.
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    Eat 6 small meals a day, never miss a meal, eat a balanced diet, but have this rule - 70% lean meat proteins and veg, 20% Carbs, 10% fats.

    Tend to have 2g of protein per 1kg of body weight.

    Just try to keep your metabolism at a high so after working out it burns your weight while sitting in front of the TV.

    Have one cheat meal a day.

    Also read up on Mens Fitness magazine and Mens Health magazine - very very good magazines with similarly good websites.
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    (Original post by MadbizL)
    Eat 6 small meals a day, never miss a meal,
    Meal frequency has little or no effect on weight loss.

    eat a balanced diet, but have this rule - 70% lean meat proteins and veg, 20% Carbs, 10% fats.
    Dietary fat does not make you fat - anyone looking to be healthy or lose weight should be getting more than 10% of their calories from fats.

    Secondly a diet of 70% lean meat is a waste even if he could afford it in the first place.

    Just try to keep your metabolism at a high so after working out it burns your weight while sitting in front of the TV.
    Most people's basal metabolic rates are actually faster before they lose weight and the act of losing weight tends to depress it.

    Have one cheat meal a day.
    A week maybe, certainly not a day.

    Also read up on Mens Fitness magazine and Mens Health magazine - very very good magazines with similarly good websites.
    MensFitness and MensHealth are absolute arse gravy - all they do is feed people's desires and insecurities with unrealistic, outdated or simply poor advice.

    If you want to actually learn something about training read a decent book (eg; New Rules of Lifting, Infinite Intensity, Starting Strength, 5/3/1, etc) and/or a good web resource (eg; Exrx, EliteFTS, T-Nation, BodyRecomposition, RossTraining, etc).
 
 
 
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