Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Bearing removal watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Not strictly cars but someone here might have a good answer! I need to replace a couple of bearings in a grass collector for a ride on mower. They look to be just pressed into relatively thin gauge steel, so just belting them with a hammer doesn't do much to them (the steel flexes a bit too much). Slide hammer/blind bearing puller seem the obvious choices but they seem very expensive for a fairly simple bit of kit. Any other good methods of removing them? I don't really want to heat them as it'll take all the paint off.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Hydraulic press is the obvious answer. Too expensive to have in a DIY garage, but take it to an engineering company and they'll have them out for a fiver. Some places Ive worked have had them, bloody brilliant pieces of kit.

    Or, if you dont fancy that, brace the steel around the bearing underneath and put something protruding on top - socket for example - and hit it really hard. It might come out, but you stand a good risk of damaging the bearing house.

    Dont use heat on the bearing, firstly you'll **** it up, secondly it'll be no easier to get out. You can cut them out with a gas axe, but it really is last resort and takes a lot of care, patience and skill to do. Internal bearings (like wot it sounds you have) rather than shaft bearings are much harder to do, personally I wouldnt be confident having a go at it. You need to put so much heat in there because of the time it takes to be careful that everything around it gets very very hot. Any plastic parts would melt and your paint would burn off.

    For my money, take it down to any engineering firm and let them do it with proper kit. It'll be quicker, simpler and less hassel than you spending 2 hours doing it only to find you've knacked it anyway.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I didn't think of a press actually. I've seen some go for relatively little - though some of them just use bottle jacks in a frame! Might invest in one when I've got my own workshop. The problem with these bearings is that they're mounted in a sheet steel casing about 4ft long, so even if it would fit onto a press chances are the casing would bend before the bearing starts to move. After coming up with lots of different ideas I realised simple is probably best - current plan is to get a long piece of stud, a couple of penny washers and a couple of nuts. The bearings are in a casing either end of a shaft (the shaft's been removed) so putting the stud through with penny washers on the outer face of the bearings and doing the nuts up should wind the bearings out - obviously one will go first, but hopefully not before the other's moved enough to just belt it out with a hammer. Otherwise it'll be down to the engineering firm! I'm not too worried about damaging these bearings tbh - they've both ended up full of grass (sealed for life - yeah right) and are seized solid. Cue one bent axle and one snapped shield mount - I love it when people ignore a problem!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    You wouldnt bend the casing, not if its done properly.

    Just brace around the bearing, 4 blocks of wood, and the press will just push on the bearing. I think your way is very likely to bend the casing, unless you can brace it. If you want to do it like that try and put 2 pieces of wood down the middle, if you get me, on either side of them. Otherwise as you tighten the nut it'll just nip the sides together rather than pull the bearings out.

    Its not a complicated thing, just ensure that the housing - in your case the sheet metal - cannot move in the direction your pushing/pulling. G-clamps, blocks of wood, anything just to immobilise them and direct the force through the right area.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Bearings arrived this morning so just removed the old bearings. Did it as a bit of a hybrid - did one bearing at a time, using a piece of stud, big washer and nut on the bearing and a piece of tube on the other side to spread the load on the frame. Then I basically reversed the setup to put the new bearings in, then found the new pulley (with stub axle welded on) doesn't run true. The last one had a bent axle, this one the pulley wasn't straight when they welded it..
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

This forum is supported by:
Updated: September 29, 2010
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.