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    If an employee does something bad or naughty. Breaks company policy, say. Is it okay for their employer to not pay them for that shift. Put them under pay suspension?

    It happened to me and I complained to my sister (who works in a supermarket part time) and she said it was fine, and that if you ever come into her work and don't bring your card/badge thing you don't get paid for those hours of work you do, because it's a violation of company policy. Please help thanks!!!

    xx
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    bump erooney
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    what? i'm pretty sure it's illegal for them not to pay you if you turn up and do your shift as normal, badge or no badge.

    "Sorry not good enough today, no pay"....yeah.
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    (Original post by Duckandthat)
    what? i'm pretty sure it's illegal for them not to pay you if you turn up and do your shift as normal, badge or no badge.

    "Sorry not good enough today, no pay"....yeah.
    Are you sure??? My sisters with a huge supermarket chain Wm Morrisons and she said if you break company policy then you don't get paid for an 8hr shift. Maybe she is mistaken.

    I am in a bar and we have a weird system which records against you for any complaints or bad practice.
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    I'm pretty sure that's illegal...
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    Wow sounds dodgy.

    If I was at work and they refused to pay me for that shift I would bugger off home. I'd then consult CAB. Consult the Citizens Advice Bureau website as they are pretty good.

    Not paying you for hours worked is illegal I would think. Sounds like your bosses chatting bull ****.
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    no, im not sure, i was just coming from a common sense perspective - maybe they could do that if you break company policy- but when a customer complains about you?!! customers are idiots and will complain because they have nothing better to do, or theyre just on a power trip and want to see someone ********* on their say-so- how is that fair on employees?
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    Wow sounds dodgy.

    If I was at work and they refused to pay me for that shift I would bugger off home. I'd then consult CAB. Consult the Citizens Advice Bureau website as they are pretty good.

    Not paying you for hours worked is illegal I would think. Sounds like your bosses chatting bull ****.
    i dont want to get sacked though and to be fair i did break company policy and was complained against.
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    i live in Scotland btw.
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    (Original post by shygirl18)
    Are you sure??? My sisters with a huge supermarket chain Wm Morrisons and she said if you break company policy then you don't get paid for an 8hr shift. Maybe she is mistaken.
    If she accepts that, she's not mistaken, she's being taken advantage of - no, an employer cannot refuse to pay you for not wearing a badge or some similar infraction. If they deem what you did serious enough, they can fire you or send you home because they won't allow you to work without the badge, but if you are there and working, they have to pay you for it.
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    Wow sounds dodgy.

    If I was at work and they refused to pay me for that shift I would bugger off home. I'd then consult CAB. Consult the Citizens Advice Bureau website as they are pretty good.

    Not paying you for hours worked is illegal I would think. Sounds like your bosses chatting bull ****.
    Thanks so much. yeah I got this off the site:

    Is an employer entitled to make deductions from an employee’s pay
    By law, an employer is only entitled to make certain deductions from an employee’s pay. If the employer does not pay the employee at all, this counts as a 100% deduction. There are rules about what counts as pay for the purposes of when the employer can make deductions, see below.
    In most cases, an employer can only lawfully make a deduction from an employee’s pay if the deduction is:-
    required to be made by law. For example, employers are required to deduct tax and national insurance from their employee’s pay by law; or
    allowed for by the employee’s contract. This means that there must be a specific clause in the contract which allows for that particular deduction to be made. The deduction can then only be made lawfully if the employee is given a written copy of that term in the contract before any deduction is made under it. This would cover deductions such as union dues or payments to a pension scheme; or
    the deduction has been agreed to in writing by the employee before it is deducted.
    There are particular deductions which an employer can make which do not have to fit into the categories listed above. These deductions are:
    a deduction because the worker has been genuinely overpaid
    a deduction made because the employee took part in industrial action
    a deduction made by an employer under a court order or an order from an employment tribunal, such as an attachment of earnings order (in Scotland, an earnings arrestment).



    I refused a tip from a man, he is such a perv and then he complained about me and said all this crap about how i served him coldly and lots of other things (some of which were true but most was ********) I don't want to lose this job. I am really really poor and there is no way i could make ends meet otherwise.
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    (Original post by shygirl18)
    i dont want to get sacked though and to be fair i did break company policy and was complained against.
    Breaking company policy doesn't justify them not paying you. It actually depends how you broke company policy tbh.

    If you broke company policy by not turning up to work they can legally not pay you. However if you broke company policy by being rude/not completely fulfilling duties at work then they cannot legally refuse to pay you. (They can however give you a disciplinary and give you written warnings!)

    I just got advice off someone very knowledgeable at work, he has been both self employed and PAYE taxed for the last god knows how many years.

    Consult CAB!

    Your sister shouldn't have forfeited her pay, if she arrives to work without uniform (pass) her employer should have sent her home to sort herself out (without pay) or let her off that day (without pay). They cannot legally make her work and refuse to pay her. Sounds like it was just an idle threat!
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    OK, first and foremost: No, it is NOT legal. You worked and you are entitled to your pay.
    HOWEVER
    It does depend on what that malpractice is, and what your contract states. If, for example, you are being accused of just signing in and then skivving work and just coming back to sign out, then no, they do not have to pay you (so long that they can prove that you didn't work!) or if you signed a contract saying that if you get accused of anything, then payment is withheld until the situation is dealt with, then yes, they can legally do that.
    HOWEVER
    If you did not sign this, then you must declare in writing that you want your payment for the hours worked otherwise you'll be forced to seek legal advice, and if necessary, legal action. Keep a hold of this letter, and give it to you manager in person, so that you are 100% positive that s/he got a copy. After that, give her the day to get back to you, if not, ring back at store opening hours in the morning, or whatever time your manager gets in, and ask her if anything is being done. No matter what the answer, tell her that you'd like it in writing and that you'll be down ASAP to collect that in writing. Ring up ACAS and explain the situation in full, they'll give you free legal advice and even pursue the case further if they think that it is a good enough cause!
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    (Original post by shygirl18)

    I refused a tip from a man, he is such a perv and then he complained about me and said all this crap about how i served him coldly and lots of other things (some of which were true but most was ********) I don't want to lose this job. I am really really poor and there is no way i could make ends meet otherwise.
    You boss is a knob and sounds like they value that the customer is always right. :rolleyes: I got in trouble for accepting a tip once! (in a hotel aswell...I was only paid NMW!)

    As you don't want to lose your job you continue working as you are (tread carefully) and speak to CAB and (ACAS as the poster above stated) when you get your pay. Your employer cannot refuse to pay you or sack you for disagreeing with your stance on this. If they do then that is 'unfair dismissal' (if they sack you) or even 'forced resignation' if they force you to leave.

    Luckily employment law in this country is good. Make sure you are aware of your basic employees rights.
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    (Original post by shygirl18)

    I refused a tip from a man, he is such a perv and then he complained about me and said all this crap about how i served him coldly and lots of other things (some of which were true but most was ********) I don't want to lose this job. I am really really poor and there is no way i could make ends meet otherwise.
    It doesn't even sound like you did anything wrong, my friend works at a bar and they defend her if a customer is pervy or inapropriate they dont dock her pay .
    You never have to deal with customers if they are being *****, I cant count the amount of times I have hung up on customers who have been rude to me yet even the worst bosses would have stuck up for me as they know what it's like...
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    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    OK, first and foremost: No, it is NOT legal. You worked and you are entitled to your pay.
    HOWEVER
    It does depend on what that malpractice is, and what your contract states. If, for example, you are being accused of just signing in and then skivving work and just coming back to sign out, then no, they do not have to pay you (so long that they can prove that you didn't work!) or if you signed a contract saying that if you get accused of anything, then payment is withheld until the situation is dealt with, then yes, they can legally do that.
    HOWEVER
    If you did not sign this, then you must declare in writing that you want your payment for the hours worked otherwise you'll be forced to seek legal advice, and if necessary, legal action. Keep a hold of this letter, and give it to you manager in person, so that you are 100% positive that s/he got a copy. After that, give her the day to get back to you, if not, ring back at store opening hours in the morning, or whatever time your manager gets in, and ask her if anything is being done. No matter what the answer, tell her that you'd like it in writing and that you'll be down ASAP to collect that in writing. Ring up ACAS and explain the situation in full, they'll give you free legal advice and even pursue the case further if they think that it is a good enough cause!
    Yeah, I'm complacent because I definitely signed lots of things during my trainings. At the time I was so grateful for a job and I never imagined I'd do anything to upset them :/
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    I worked at Sainsburys and if a customer was rude, threatening or made us otherwise uncomfortable, we were allowed to stand up and walk away. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO SERVE A CUSTOMER, NOR DO YOU HAVE TO ACCEPT ANYTHING FROM THEM if you do not feel comfortable. Getting docked pay for this is UNFAIR PROCEDURE.
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    (Original post by shygirl18)
    Yeah, I'm complacent because I definitely signed lots of things during my trainings. At the time I was so grateful for a job and I never imagined I'd do anything to upset them :/
    You seriously need to speak to ACAS then :yes:
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    Even if you might have breached company policy, they must still pay you for the hours worked.
    If they don't then they are breaking the law.
    They can't just say - you did this wrong today so no pay.
    Some companies do try to make up crazy regulations and rules but in court these won't stand up.

    Get down to the CAB or similar and get some help.
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    Wow sounds dodgy.

    If I was at work and they refused to pay me for that shift I would bugger off home. I'd then consult CAB. Consult the Citizens Advice Bureau website as they are pretty good.

    Not paying you for hours worked is illegal I would think. Sounds like your bosses chatting bull ****.
    I agree
 
 
 
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