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    For my biology coursework I'm doing the affect of copper sulphate on respiration in yeast. I'm measuring the amount of gas produced every 15 seconds for 2 mins using a gas syringe. I did one run just adding 10 mls of water to 30mls of yeast and it worked fine. I then left my yeast solution (in a water bath at 37C) over lunch. When I came back I did a run with 10mls of 1M copper sulphate (which is supposed to inhibit the enzymes in yeast) and it reacted faster than my first run. I repeated the water run and it didn't produce any gas. I repeated the copper sulphate run twice more and the water run again and got the same results (ie the water run didn't react and the copper sulphate reacted quite fast). Anyone have any idea why this might have happened?

    tl;dr Why would yeast not respire on its own but respire in the presence of copper sulphate?
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    I would assume it would either use copper sulphate as a source of sulphate to respire from or use copper sulphate as a source of copper to be used in an enzyme that is responsible for respiration. But these are only speculations.
 
 
 
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