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    (Original post by lekky)
    Re-posting:

    You need to EVERYTHING there is to know about the course. Know what PBL is. Know about plenaries, FRS, lectures, VS. Know why you like that kind of course and also know what the negatives are. Electives, SSCs etc.

    Be prepared for a question about how you would feel it that changed. Unlikely they'd ask it but don't be caught out if they do. I'd talk about change is a natural progress and builds on lessons previously learnt or something like that.

    There are lots of questions about the course. Also know your PS, have something to say about everything you wrote on there.

    Know some current event issues related to medicine. Look on the BBC health website (i made it my homepage so I was always up to date) and get a feel for several items and then choose two items and know them inside out so that you can talk about them if asked.

    Then I'd just form opinions on issues like euthanasia, abortion. Know about the european time directive and form an opinion on that. know about the career progression of a doctor (FY1, etc etc)

    hope that helps.
    You are awesome =D ! One quick question, what kind of negatives should i mention ? Just general disadvantages of the PBL course ? or negatives of the Glasgow course ?
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    (Original post by G550NDH)
    You are awesome =D ! One quick question, what kind of negatives should i mention ? Just general disadvantages of the PBL course ? or negatives of the Glasgow course ?
    there's a good page for that in the isc medical school, comes up with any possible adv n disadv you can think of


    isc interview book**
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    talk about 3 weeks too late with that guidance! i hope i do get an offer because my grades are good (i know everyones are for medicine buuuuut) and my PS was ok i thought and had everything medicine wanted + more. i hope they don't judge me just on my interview. probably didn't help that my voice was no more than a whisper cos i was ill.....oh the horror thinking back
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    (Original post by tilly_tot)
    talk about 3 weeks too late with that guidance! i hope i do get an offer because my grades are good (i know everyones are for medicine buuuuut) and my PS was ok i thought and had everything medicine wanted + more. i hope they don't judge me just on my interview. probably didn't help that my voice was no more than a whisper cos i was ill.....oh the horror thinking back
    aww, she posted it in one of the posts where she quoted me, but she was pretty helpful
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    (Original post by G550NDH)
    You are awesome =D ! One quick question, what kind of negatives should i mention ? Just general disadvantages of the PBL course ? or negatives of the Glasgow course ?
    Well the negatives of PBL are basically the negatives of the glasgow course lol

    So you could talk about how its hard to adjust to liek I said in the PM,
    -- not knowing how much detial to go into (this it he BIG one)
    -- getting to grips with which textbooks to look for what in
    -- difficult if not everyone in the PBL group is participating equally
    -- not one I realised until I got here but the knowledge gap between graduates of science degrees, eg. in my PBL thre was a graduate with an anatomy degree and I think she found it difficult knowing how much to say etc
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    (Original post by tilly_tot)
    talk about 3 weeks too late with that guidance! i hope i do get an offer because my grades are good (i know everyones are for medicine buuuuut) and my PS was ok i thought and had everything medicine wanted + more. i hope they don't judge me just on my interview. probably didn't help that my voice was no more than a whisper cos i was ill.....oh the horror thinking back
    Sorry, I did post it before though! I was just reposting it for G550NDH
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    (Original post by lekky)
    Sorry, I did post it before though! I was just reposting it for G550NDH
    it's cool! i didn't even see this thread until after my interview. if id've seen your post, id've been sorted basically all that came up in the interview and i didn't have a clue! especially the F1 F2 doctor stuff and the questions about pbl. i don't even wanna do pbl so that was a difficult q to answer
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    (Original post by lekky)
    Also health conditions that apply to West Scotland.

    These are basically
    - heart disease
    - lung disease
    - could also mention trauma cases as increased knife crime

    How could it be improved?
    - stop smoking, drinking, eating
    - start exercising

    Obviously. Very summaried. But pretty much the essense.

    Might be worthwhile knowing about differences in NHS Scotland/England
    The only ones I can think of off the top of my head is cervical screening ages, 21 in Scotland 25 in England, could mention that but if you do make sure you know about cervical screening & why its done & what the arguements are for the diff ages

    And also that a person under 16 can refuse treatment in scotland but technically not England

    I have no idea what white papers, etc, are so (a) don't worry about it if you don't and (b) can someone tell me? :p:
    Had to laugh at this... think you meant to stop eating and drinking crap. Hehe.

    Also, on the point of cervical smears - has this changed recently? When I was younger, you got your first smear as soon as you were sexually active which obviously is highly variable. Think if it is now 21 then that is a step backwards tbh.

    I would also say that alcoholism, drug addiction, type 2 diabetes and obesity are problems here too.
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    Have Glasgow decided upon a UKCAT cut-off score or are they still interviewing people with relatively high scores ? ?
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    (Original post by sweetchilli)
    Had to laugh at this... think you meant to stop eating and drinking crap. Hehe.

    Also, on the point of cervical smears - has this changed recently? When I was younger, you got your first smear as soon as you were sexually active which obviously is highly variable. Think if it is now 21 then that is a step backwards tbh.

    I would also say that alcoholism, drug addiction, type 2 diabetes and obesity are problems here too.
    Aha yes.

    however after today's public health lecture I can see the foolishness of my post. not that easy. mostly seems to come from an optimistic attitude, which is installed in upbringing. So solution :confused: Not that easy it seems.

    21 I was taught/thought but may be incorrect.

    Eventually if the cervical cancer jab is effective enough they may get rid of it all together, I'm sure if you googled hard enough you could find something on that, because then the screening programme wouldn't reach the criteria for screening programmes as too few cases would be found.
    ^^ Just something that was mentioned as a side note in a lecture
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    (Original post by SRK.)
    Have Glasgow decided upon a UKCAT cut-off score or are they still interviewing people with relatively high scores ? ?
    think it's currently at 655 or 660
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    Is it me or does it looks like Glasgow's interviewed pretty much everyone according to the stalking page?
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    Oh my Gosh!! Interview tomorrow!! I'm almost panicking to death now!:afraid: Who else here got interview tomorrow? Mine is on 3:30 pm.
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    (Original post by lekky)
    Aha yes.

    however after today's public health lecture I can see the foolishness of my post. not that easy. mostly seems to come from an optimistic attitude, which is installed in upbringing. So solution :confused: Not that easy it seems.

    21 I was taught/thought but may be incorrect.

    Eventually if the cervical cancer jab is effective enough they may get rid of it all together, I'm sure if you googled hard enough you could find something on that, because then the screening programme wouldn't reach the criteria for screening programmes as too few cases would be found.
    ^^ Just something that was mentioned as a side note in a lecture
    Apparently, Scotland changed the cervical screening age to 20 in 1989.

    As for the jab, it is only applicable for those cancers that are caused by the HPV and thus can't protect against all causes so think screening would need to continue?
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    (Original post by jojo9043)
    Oh my Gosh!! Interview tomorrow!! I'm almost panicking to death now!:afraid: Who else here got interview tomorrow? Mine is on 3:30 pm.
    Mine's tomorrow, too. 4:15PM.
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    (Original post by sweetchilli)
    Apparently, Scotland changed the cervical screening age to 20 in 1989.

    As for the jab, it is only applicable for those cancers that are caused by the HPV and thus can't protect against all causes so think screening would need to continue?
    Please bare in mind I may very well be typing rubbish, BUT
    I think one of the criteria for a screening programme is that the prevalence of the disease is high enough that quite a lot of people are caught and treated earlier due to the screening, what the woman who gave the lecture said was that if the HPV vaccine is so effective that the incidence of cervical cancer decreased so much that the cervical screening programme did not find many people then it may be judged not worthwhile anymore. If it's finding 1 person in 1,000,000 then is it worth the money, resources, and anxiety it causes?

    The HPV vaccine only protects against two strains of HPV, but those two straights (I think 16 & 18?) are responsible for around 70% of cervical cancers.

    I would recommend you do not use this in any interview.
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    (Original post by lekky)
    Please bare in mind I may very well be typing rubbish, BUT
    I think one of the criteria for a screening programme is that the prevalence of the disease is high enough that quite a lot of people are caught and treated earlier due to the screening, what the woman who gave the lecture said was that if the HPV vaccine is so effective that the incidence of cervical cancer decreased so much that the cervical screening programme did not find many people then it may be judged not worthwhile anymore. If it's finding 1 person in 1,000,000 then is it worth the money, resources, and anxiety it causes?

    The HPV vaccine only protects against two strains of HPV, but those two straights (I think 16 & 18?) are responsible for around 70% of cervical cancers.

    I would recommend you do not use this in any interview.
    Hmm..good ethical question though...is it worth the money,resources and anxiety it causes?

    For those who are diagnosed and subsequently cured as a result of screening, I'm sure it is worth it. For those who might lose their lives to cervical cancer without the screening programme in place, I think there may be public/familial outrage. Of course, this is all speculative if screening did stop in the future.

    Interesting to think about though. As someone who had CIN1 post-natal (no HPV and detected by smear) and was successfully treated, I would personally be in favour of continued screening. Given the HPV vaccine is not given to all age groups, those not offered it would still need some form of monitoring/screening.
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    (Original post by sweetchilli)
    Hmm..good ethical question though...is it worth the money,resources and anxiety it causes?

    For those who are diagnosed and subsequently cured as a result of screening, I'm sure it is worth it. For those who might lose their lives to cervical cancer without the screening programme in place, I think there may be public/familial outrage. Of course, this is all speculative if screening did stop in the future.

    Interesting to think about though. As someone who had CIN1 post-natal (no HPV and detected by smear) and was successfully treated, I would personally be in favour of continued screening. Given the HPV vaccine is not given to all age groups, those not offered it would still need some form of monitoring/screening.
    It is worth it now as it meets the criteria for screening -- enough people are found. But screening programmes are rejected all the time as the disease is not prevalent enough. Obviously it is more difficult when the programme is already in place, public reaction etc, but this woman did talk about it as a real possibility/probability for if the HPV vaccine is successful enough.

    from my notes:


    Certain criteria need to be fulfilled if screening is to be justified:
    • The disease must be common enough for screening to be of value
    • A suitable test must be available with high specificity and sensitivity
    • The test itself must not be harmful
    • Suitable treatment must be available
    • Early diagnosis and treatment should confer benefit to the patient. This applies to only a few diseases as yet


    I think the point she was generally trying to get is that if point (1) is lost, and it is no longer common, then cervical screening may no longer be justified and may be phased out.


    If 1 in 1,000,000 are found from screening, is it worth the screening? For that 1 person yes, but for the anxiety and stress its caused to other individuals, and then consider how many people's lives could have been saved/improved with the money that has been spent on the screening.. etc.
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    I've got UKCAT average score of 722 and 6 higher As.
    Got an interview for Glasgow on the 28th. Really nervous, just trying to prepare!
    Any tips as to what issues in the NHS would be best to cover so I can talk about them?
    And also, not sure what to wear, any advice on that?
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    wore a suit tho i was the only one wearing that on the day
 
 
 
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