How many cm3 is 5 grams of water? Watch

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mrmarsupial
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#1
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#1
as title plz :P
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nwoluk
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5

one gram is equal to the weight of a 1cm^3 block of ice.
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El_Borish
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yep 5. 1cm water = 1g. thats the rule
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thefish_uk
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(Original post by nwoluk)
5

one gram is equal to the weight of 1 cm^3 of ice.
Yeah

Isn't that liquid water that has a density of 1g/cm^3?
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nwoluk
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(Original post by thefish_uk)
Isn't that liquid water that has a density of 1g/cm^3?
apparently thats what the metric system is based upon; god knows were i heard it.. but yeah.. 1 gram = weight of 1cm^3 block of ice.

try it some day.. or not.
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Dickie
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(Original post by nwoluk)
apparently thats what the metric system is based upon; god knows were i heard it.. but yeah.. 1 gram = weight of 1cm^3 block of ice.

try it some day.. or not.
well then 5g of water would be less than 5cm^3, because ice expands when it freezes.

I think fish was right.
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iiikewldude
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density of water = 1 gcm^-3

density = mass/volume

volume = mass/density

volume = 5g/1gcm^-3 = 5 cm^3
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hornblower
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I hate to be picky but when the French defined the kilogram, they got it wrong slightly (yes this is true). Thus, 1 kg = 1000.028 cm^3 of water at maximum density, i.e. at 4 degrees Celsius. (The litre was also defined as 1000.028 cm^3 until 1964.)

The strict answer is therefore 5.00014 cm^3, at 4 degrees Celsius and standard pressure.

J.
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thefish_uk
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(Original post by hornblower)
I hate to be picky but when the French defined the kilogram, they got it wrong slightly (yes this is true). Thus, 1 kg = 1000.028 cm^3 of water at maximum density, i.e. at 4 degrees Celsius. (The litre was also defined as 1000.028 cm^3 until 1964.)

The strict answer is therefore 5.00014 cm^3, at 4 degrees Celsius and standard pressure.

J.
Sure...

Who the hell wants to be that accurate?
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username9816
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(Original post by thefish_uk)
Sure...

Who the hell wants to be that accurate?
hornblower?
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iiikewldude
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(Original post by hornblower)
I hate to be picky but when the French defined the kilogram, they got it wrong slightly (yes this is true). Thus, 1 kg = 1000.028 cm^3 of water at maximum density, i.e. at 4 degrees Celsius. (The litre was also defined as 1000.028 cm^3 until 1964.)

The strict answer is therefore 5.00014 cm^3, at 4 degrees Celsius and standard pressure.

J.
quoting to that kind of uncertanty is just stupid and i'm sure that if u really wanted to u could work out the volume to an even more silly amount of decimal places.
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hornblower
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Just blowing my horn! lol
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JaF
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Temp Density Weight
0 999.87 4.99935
2 999.97 4.99985
4 1000.00 5.00000
6 999.97 4.99985
8 999.88 4.99940
10 999.73 4.99865
12 999.53 4.99765
14 999.27 4.99635
16 998.97 4.99485
18 998.62 4.99310
20 998.23 4.99115
22 997.80 4.98900
24 997.33 4.98665
26 996.81 4.98405
28 996.26 4.98130
30 995.68 4.97840
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