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    itys called diffusion of responsibility-- in a crowd people see it going on but think someone else will intervene and assume its not their place to do so
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    (Original post by JCM89)
    I'm not tough and I recognise cowardice in myself as well others.
    I cetrainly was not afraid of being "shafted" by a pair of minute 13 year olds.

    It's more the context of the situation, and the fact that I was more afraid of "putting myself out there". I'll freely admit that.
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    (Original post by ThinkingThoughts)
    Hi,

    I was on the bus going to work today and there were two little scally lads about age 12-14 when I got on. They weren't causing any problems when I got on but a few stops after a young girl (10-11) of Indian/Pakistan ethnicity got on the bus coming home from school.

    The two little scumbags were giving her abuse throughout the journey pertaining entirely to her race. It was quite uncomfortable to see, but it was happening at the front of the bus, the bus was full and I was at the back and I did very nearly confront the two of them but somebody did it before me but that was 10 mins after it started.

    Anyway, the guy who confronted him was realy angry (was white if it matters to anyone) and actually clipped the main lad quite forcefully round the ear and acted quite agressively (I personally think that's what they needed they certainly were put in their place) and demanded he apologise to the girl.

    This brings up so many issues.

    - Why were these kids so bigoted at their age?
    - Why did NOBODY (Including myself) on the bus intervene sooner?
    - Why did I say to myself "Say something" but couldn't?
    - That man could get into some DEEP **** for defending what was right (He did "attack" him). Is that right?

    etc.

    Thoughts please

    -Possible lack of education or a poor upbringing where their parents either forgot to teach them how everyone is equal, or have made racist comments themselves.
    -People are too polite in Britain and are worried about confrontation. I personally would've said something straight away, but I can see why you didn't.
    -It's hard to know what to do in that situation, and you didn't know what the consequences were. Don't beat yourself up about it!
    -Yeah, maybe the violence was a bit OTT, but he should be proud for standing up for the girl. Hopefully he shook them up a bit to teach them a lesson!

    Racism sickens me. Any kind of prejudice sickens me, to be honest. I personally think it's a lack of education that creates prejudice idiots.
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    (Original post by ThinkingThoughts)
    I cetrainly was not afraid of being "shafted" by a pair of minute 13 year olds. It's more the context of the situation, and the fact that I was more afraid of "putting myself out there". I'll freely admit that.
    Course you will admit that, as it doesn't really challenge your masculinity. Admitting fear of a couple of kids would.
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    (Original post by JCM89)
    Course you will admit that, as it doesn't really challenge your masculinity. Admitting fear of a couple of kids would.
    Mate, I'm bisexual, I work in elderly care, I like southern comfort. My masculinity is the least of my concerns, but thanks for revealing your preocupation - Your manhood, and a couple of kids.
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    It is just poor upbringing, that's all. A lot of English parents do not raise their children in a proper way so they just act like lunatics when they are outside.
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    I'd say the kids were racist because their friends all do it or they saw it at home. It doesn't come from nowhere. And it takes guts to intervene in something like that - good on the guy who stood up to them, the stupid kids deserved it.
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    (Original post by ThinkingThoughts)
    I cetrainly was not afraid of being "shafted" by a pair of minute 13 year olds.
    (Original post by ThinkingThoughts)
    I'm bisexual, I work in elderly care, I like southern comfort. My masculinity is the least of my concerns
    When you can't stand up to a couple of "minute kids" harassing a little girl, I'd say you are a sorry excuse for a human being let alone a man.
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    (Original post by OrmondDrone)
    When you can't stand up to a couple of "minute kids" harassing a little girl, I'd say you are a sorry excuse for a human being let alone a man.
    Okay Alf.

    Meanwhile, you were in the basement plotting.

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    (Original post by ThinkingThoughts)
    Mate, I'm bisexual, I work in elderly care, I like southern comfort. My masculinity is the least of my concerns, but thanks for revealing your preocupation - Your manhood, and a couple of kids.
    Hrm... yes, this situation is all about me :rolleyes: Not about you trying to come up with excuses for your cowardice and sublimated racism.
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    You were just not confident enough, and so were most of the people on that bus. Clearly not a horrible person, just be more confident next time..
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    (Original post by JCM89)
    Hrm... yes, this situation is all about me :rolleyes: Not about you trying to come up with excuses for your cowardice and sublimated racism.
    Actually no, this thread was about the issues cited in the topic before you turned it into a personal attack on me.
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    I personally would have gone up to the front if it had been going on for at least a few minutes. I wouldn't have touched the boys, but would have asked them to stop being so rude and racist. I think no one wanted to be the person to do that because of the whole thing Derren Brown was talking about on his show the other week. It's a natural human reaction, no one wants to stand up and be the first person to do something in an emergency or situation such as this. For saying why children so young could be that nasty, I have no idea. I was never like at the age of 12, and that was only 5 years ago. So I'd say it's probably a combination of their parents and kids getting an education on how wrong rascism and bullying is, so thinking they have to rebel against what they're being told to do or something.

    Children will always be exceptionally cruel.
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    (Original post by OrmondDrone)
    When you can't stand up to a couple of "minute kids" harassing a little girl, I'd say you are a sorry excuse for a human being let alone a man.
    To be honest ditto (but I probably would have left out 'let alone a man'). I wouldn't want to get involved but the total lack of self respect that would come with not doing so would be difficult to bear. In such situations action is the only acceptable form of reaction.
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    (Original post by ThinkingThoughts)
    Actually no, this thread was about the issues cited in the topic before you turned it into a personal attack on me.
    You asked in your original post "Why did I say to myself "Say something" but couldn't?" and he answered "cowardice and sublimated racism". That's not a personal attack but a perfectly reasonable response to the question you asked and the situation you've described.

    Your prickliness suggests that you feel guilt for doing nothing. That's a good thing. Perhaps you'll actually do something next time you see someone being abused rather than indulgently pondering your inaction on an internet forum.
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    (Original post by OrmondDrone)
    You asked in your original post "Why did I say to myself "Say something" but couldn't?" and he answered "cowardice and sublimated racism". That's not a personal attack but a perfectly reasonable response to the question you asked and the situation you've described.

    Your prickliness suggests that you feel guilt for doing nothing. That's a good thing. Perhaps you'll actually do something next time you see someone being abused rather than indulgently pondering your inaction on an internet forum.
    Oh hark. It's easy to suggest you would youself online. It's different when something such as is thrown in your face on a mundane mid-day.

    Suffice to say I severely doubt, but can't objectively say you're nothing more than an internet warrior. Grant me the luxury of assuming I'm not hero, not even on World of Warcraft - but probably get out more than you.
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    Q: Why did NOBODY (Including myself) on the bus intervene sooner?

    A: Scared they'd be subjected to similar levels of abuse.

    Q: Why did I say to myself "Say something" but couldn't?

    A: A lot of people were probably in the same position.

    Q: That man could get into some DEEP **** for defending what was right (He did "attack" him). Is that right?

    A: Can you imagine the scene at the police station? "This **** 'kin' digged me while I was bein' racist to some brown bird on the bus" He'd be laughed out the door or probably be arrested himself.
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    :love: The guy that confronted them... The world needs more people like that.
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    Bystander effect.
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    (Original post by Ultimate_Geek)
    Bystander effect.
    What would you say of those so quick to judge on the intenets? Calling me Racist and all that. I was disgusted by all this, and compelled to act - but I couldn't. It felt like a locking mechanism. I just couldn't supress it. I very much wanted to defend this young girl, it was like being coherced into non-action by people not present even.

    In future I'd like to act.
 
 
 
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